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Paul G. Richardson, Jacob P. Laubach, Robert L. Schlossman, Constantine Mitsiades, and Kenneth Anderson

Peripheral neuropathy (PN) and asthenia (fatigue) occur as both disease- and treatment-related complications in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Risk factors for treatment-related PN, which has an estimated incidence of 37% to 83% among patients with MM, include therapy duration, dose intensity, cumulative dose, and the presence of preexisting neuropathy. Asthenia is the most common adverse effect of treatment, occurring in approximately 76% to 96% of patients receiving therapy. The severity of PN and asthenia can range from mild to potentially debilitating. These conditions can be dose limiting; they may interfere with optimizing duration of therapy and may also substantially affect patient quality of life. Regular screening and monitoring, combined with patient education and effective management strategies, can reduce the risk of these treatment-related complications, as well as their consequences.

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Erin Currin, Lanell M. Peterson, Erin K. Schubert, Jeanne M. Link, Kenneth A. Krohn, Robert B. Livingston, David A. Mankoff, and Hannah M. Linden

Changes in estrogen receptor (ER) expression over the course of therapy may affect response to endocrine therapy. However, measuring temporal changes in ER expression requires serial biopsies, which are impractical and poorly tolerated by most patients. Functional ER imaging using 18F-fluoroestradiol (FES)-PET provides a noninvasive measure of regional ER expression and is ideally suited to serial studies. Additionally, lack of measurable FES uptake in metastatic sites of disease predict tumor progression in patients with ER-positive primary tumors treated with endocrine therapy. This report presents a case of restored sensitivity to endocrine therapy in a patient with bone-dominant breast cancer who underwent serial observational FES-PET imaging over the course of several treatments at our center, demonstrating the temporal heterogeneity of regional ER expression. Although loss and restoration of endocrine sensitivity in patients who have undergone prior hormonal and cytotoxic treatments has been reported, this is, to our knowledge, the first time the accompanying changes in ER expression have been documented by molecular imaging.

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Jacob P. Laubach, Constantine S. Mitsiades, Anuj Mahindra, Marlise R. Luskin, Jacalyn Rosenblatt, Irene M. Ghobrial, Robert L. Schlossman, David Avigan, Noopur Raje, Nikhil C. Munshi, Kenneth C. Anderson, and Paul G. Richardson

Despite significant progress in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) over the past decade, this disease remains incurable and almost all patients ultimately experience relapse and become refractory to treatment over time. However, the outlook for patients with relapsed MM has improved markedly with the use of the immunomodulatory drugs thalidomide and lenalidomide, and the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. Moreover, the development of new drug classes based on preclinical rationale and the introduction of next-generation agents is likely to further expand treatment options and improve outcomes for relapsed MM.

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Jacob P. Laubach, Constantine S. Mitsiades, Anuj Mahindra, Robert L. Schlossman, Teru Hideshima, Dharminder Chauhan, Nicole A. Carreau, Irene M. Ghobrial, Noopur Raje, Nikhil C. Munshi, Kenneth C. Anderson, and Paul G. Richardson

Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clonal B-cell malignancy characterized by aberrant expansion of plasma cells within bone marrow and extramedullary sites. In 2009, 20,580 new cases of MM and 10,580 deaths from the disease occurred in the United States. Treatment traditionally consists of systemic chemotherapy, with adjunctive use of radiation or surgery in selected cases associated with extramedullary disease. The therapeutic landscape in MM has changed markedly in the past decade with the introduction of the novel immunomodulatory agents thalidomide and lenalidomide, and the first-in-class proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. Although MM remains an incurable malignancy, new approaches to therapy incorporating these agents have produced significantly higher response rates and improved intervals of both progression-free and overall survival in the context of randomized, controlled trials. In aggregate, the use of novel therapies in MM has been associated with substantial improvements in patient outcome.

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J. Sybil Biermann, Douglas R. Adkins, Mark Agulnik, Robert S. Benjamin, Brian Brigman, James E. Butrynski, David Cheong, Warren Chow, William T. Curry, Deborah A. Frassica, Frank J. Frassica, Kenneth R. Hande, Francis J. Hornicek, Robin L. Jones, Joel Mayerson, Sean V. McGarry, Brian McGrath, Carol D. Morris, Richard J. O'Donnell, R. Lor Randall, Victor M. Santana, Robert L. Satcher, Herrick J. Siegel, Margaret von Mehren, Mary Anne Bergman, and Hema Sundar

Primary bone cancers are extremely rare neoplasms, accounting for fewer than 0.2% of all cancers. The evaluation and treatment of patients with bone cancers requires a multidisciplinary team of physicians, including musculoskeletal, medical, and radiation oncologists, and surgeons and radiologists with demonstrated expertise in the management of these tumors. Long-term surveillance and follow-up are necessary for the management of treatment late effects related to surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. These guidelines discuss the management of chordoma, giant cell tumor of the bone, and osteosarcoma.

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J. Sybil Biermann, Douglas R. Adkins, Robert S. Benjamin, Brian Brigman, Warren Chow, Ernest U. Conrad III, Deborah A. Frassica, Frank J. Frassica, Suzanne George, Kenneth R. Hande, Francis J. Hornicek, G. Douglas Letson, Joel Mayerson, Sean V. McGarry, Brian McGrath, Carol D. Morris, Richard J. O'Donnell, R. Lor Randall, Victor M. Santana, Robert L. Satcher, Herrick J. Siegel, Neeta Somaiah, and Alan W. Yasko

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Mary B. Daly, Jennifer E. Axilbund, Saundra Buys, Beth Crawford, Carolyn D. Farrell, Susan Friedman, Judy E. Garber, Salil Goorha, Stephen B. Gruber, Heather Hampel, Virginia Kaklamani, Wendy Kohlmann, Allison Kurian, Jennifer Litton, P. Kelly Marcom, Robert Nussbaum, Kenneth Offit, Tuya Pal, Boris Pasche, Robert Pilarski, Gwen Reiser, Kristen Mahoney Shannon, Jeffrey R. Smith, Elizabeth Swisher, and Jeffrey N. Weitzel

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Daniel G. Coit, Robert Andtbacka, Christopher J. Anker, Christopher K. Bichakjian, William E. Carson III, Adil Daud, Raza A. Dilawari, Dominick DiMaio, Valerie Guild, Allan C. Halpern, F. Stephen Hodi Jr., Mark C. Kelley, Nikhil I. Khushalani, Ragini R. Kudchadkar, Julie R. Lange, Anne Lind, Mary C. Martini, Anthony J. Olszanski, Scott K. Pruitt, Merrick I. Ross, Susan M. Swetter, Kenneth K. Tanabe, John A. Thompson, Vijay Trisal, and Marshall M. Urist

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Therese B. Bevers, Deborah K. Armstrong, Banu Arun, Robert W. Carlson, Kenneth H. Cowan, Mary B. Daly, Irvin Fleming, Judy E. Garber, Mary Gemignani, William J. Gradishar, Helen Krontiras, Swati Kulkarni, Christine Laronga, Loretta Loftus, Deborah J. MacDonald, Martin C. Mahoney, Sofia D. Merajver, Ingrid Meszoely, Lisa Newman, Elizabeth Pritchard, Victoria Seewaldt, Rena V. Sellin, Charles L. Shapiro, and John H. Ward

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Mary B. Daly, Robert Pilarski, Jennifer E. Axilbund, Saundra S. Buys, Beth Crawford, Susan Friedman, Judy E. Garber, Carolyn Horton, Virginia Kaklamani, Catherine Klein, Wendy Kohlmann, Allison Kurian, Jennifer Litton, Lisa Madlensky, P. Kelly Marcom, Sofia D. Merajver, Kenneth Offit, Tuya Pal, Boris Pasche, Gwen Reiser, Kristen Mahoney Shannon, Elizabeth Swisher, Nicoleta C. Voian, Jeffrey N. Weitzel, Alison Whelan, Georgia L. Wiesner, Mary A. Dwyer, and Rashmi Kumar

During the past few years, several genetic aberrations that may contribute to increased risks for development of breast and/or ovarian cancers have been identified. The NCCN Guidelines for Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Breast and Ovarian focus specifically on the assessment of genetic mutations in BRCA1/BRCA2, TP53, and PTEN, and recommend approaches to genetic testing/counseling and management strategies in individuals with these mutations. This portion of the NCCN Guidelines includes recommendations regarding diagnostic criteria and management of patients with Cowden Syndrome/PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome.