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Focal Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy With High-Dose Interleukin-2 Therapy for Malignant Melanoma

Senthil Damodaran, Ewa Mrozek, David Liebner, and Kari Kendra

High-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) is an available treatment option for patients with metastatic melanoma or renal cell carcinoma, and is associated with sustained complete and partial responses in a subset of patients. IL-2, however, is not devoid of toxicities, most of which involve the cardiovascular system and manifest as hypotension, arrhythmias, and cardiomyopathy. This report describes an unusual presentation of takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a postmenopausal woman receiving high-dose IL-2 for metastatic melanoma.

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Cotreatment of Hairy Cell Leukemia and Melanoma With the BRAF Inhibitor Dabrafenib

James S. Blachly, Gerard Lozanski, David M. Lucas, Michael R. Grever, Kari Kendra, and Leslie A. Andritsos

The activating BRAF mutation p.V600E has been identified in many cancers, including colon and lung adenocarcinomas, papillary thyroid cancer, malignant melanoma, and hairy cell leukemia (HCL). Malignant melanoma and HCL are of particular interest because of both the high proportion of cases harboring the mutation and the dramatic responses to BRAF inhibitor therapy reported in the literature. This report presents a patient with HCL and malignant melanoma with the BRAF p.V600E mutation, and discusses the successful treatment of both cancers with the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib.

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HSR22-165: Pulmonary Function Tests (PFTs) and Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Pneumonitis

Maria Kathleen Riley, Alex Wong, Songzhu Zhao, Jing Wang, Vince Esguerra, Mingjia Li, Kari Kendra, Gabrielle Lopez, Carolyn Presley, Lai Wei, Dwight Owen, and Kevin Ho

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Association Between Pretreatment Chest Imaging and Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Pneumonitis Among Patients With Lung Cancer

Alexander Wong, Maria Riley, Songzhu Zhao, Jessica Zimmer, Matthew Viveiros, Jing Gennie Wang, Vincent Esguerra, Mingjia Li, Gabrielle Lopez, Kari Kendra, David P. Carbone, Kai He, Asrar Alahmadi, Jacob Kaufman, Regan M. Memmott, Peter G. Shields, Jeremy Brownstein, Karl Haglund, Meng Welliver, Gregory A. Otterson, Carolyn J. Presley, Lai Wei, Dwight H. Owen, and Kevin Ho

Background: Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) are a first-line and perioperative treatment for lung cancer. Pneumonitis is a potentially life-threatening complication of ICI treatment in 2% to 5% of patients; however, risk factors for developing ICI pneumonitis (ICI-p) remain undefined. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients with lung cancer who received at least one dose of ICI from 2015 through 2020 at The Ohio State University. Pneumonitis cases were documented by the treating oncologist and retrospectively evaluated for agreement between an oncologist and a pulmonologist. Patient demographic and clinical characteristics were recorded and summarized between those with and without pneumonitis for the overall cohort. Univariate and multivariable survival analyses using the Fine-Gray competing risk model were used to examine the associations. Results: A total of 471 patients with lung cancer were included, of which 402 had non–small cell lung cancer and 69 had small cell lung cancer; 39 (8%) patients in the overall cohort developed ICI-p. Preexisting interstitial abnormalities and prior chest radiation were both significantly associated with ICI-p on univariate analysis (hazard ratio [HR], 8.91; 95% CI, 4.69–16.92; P<.001; and HR, 2.81; 95% CI, 1.50–5.28; P=.001). On multivariable analyses, interstitial abnormalities remained a strong independent risk factor for ICI-p when controlling for chest radiation and type of immunotherapy (HR, 9.77; 95% CI, 5.17–18.46; P<.001). Among patients with ICI-p (n=39), those with severe (grade 3–5) pneumonitis had worse overall survival compared with those with mild (grade 1 or 2) pneumonitis (P=.001). Abnormal pulmonary function test results at both 12 and 18 months prior to ICI initiation were not significantly associated with ICI-p. Conclusions: Preexisting interstitial abnormalities on chest CT and prior chest radiation are independent risk factors that are strongly associated with ICI-p in patients with lung cancer. These findings highlight a potential need for closer observation for ICI-p among patients with these risk factors.

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NCCN Guidelines® Insights: Melanoma: Cutaneous, Version 2.2021

Featured Updates to the NCCN Guidelines

Susan M. Swetter, John A. Thompson, Mark R. Albertini, Christopher A. Barker, Joel Baumgartner, Genevieve Boland, Bartosz Chmielowski, Dominick DiMaio, Alison Durham, Ryan C. Fields, Martin D. Fleming, Anjela Galan, Brian Gastman, Kenneth Grossmann, Samantha Guild, Ashley Holder, Douglas Johnson, Richard W. Joseph, Giorgos Karakousis, Kari Kendra, Julie R. Lange, Ryan Lanning, Kim Margolin, Anthony J. Olszanski, Patrick A. Ott, Merrick I. Ross, April K. Salama, Rohit Sharma, Joseph Skitzki, Jeffrey Sosman, Evan Wuthrick, Nicole R. McMillian, and Anita M. Engh

Over the past few years, the NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma: Cutaneous have been expanded to include pathways for treatment of microscopic satellitosis (added in v2.2020), and the following Principles sections: Molecular Testing (added in v2.2019), Systemic Therapy Considerations (added in v2.2020), and Brain Metastases Management (added in v3.2020). The v1.2021 update included additional modifications of these sections and notable revisions to Principles of: Pathology, Surgical Margins for Wide Excision of Primary Melanoma, Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy, Completion/Therapeutic Lymph Node Dissection, and Radiation Therapy. These NCCN Guidelines Insights discuss the important changes to pathology and surgery recommendations, as well as additions to systemic therapy options for patients with advanced disease.

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Vulvar Cancer, Version 3.2024, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology

Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum, Catheryn M. Yashar, Rebecca Arend, Emma Barber, Kristin Bradley, Rebecca Brooks, Susana M. Campos, Junzo Chino, Hye Sook Chon, Marta Ann Crispens, Shari Damast, Christine M. Fisher, Peter Frederick, David K. Gaffney, Stephanie Gaillard, Robert Giuntoli II, Scott Glaser, Jordan Holmes, Brooke E. Howitt, Kari Kendra, Jayanthi Lea, Nita Lee, Gina Mantia-Smaldone, Andrea Mariani, David Mutch, Christa Nagel, Larissa Nekhlyudov, Mirna Podoll, Kerry Rodabaugh, Ritu Salani, John Schorge, Jean Siedel, Rachel Sisodia, Pamela Soliman, Stefanie Ueda, Renata Urban, Stephanie L. Wethington, Emily Wyse, Kristine Zanotti, Nicole McMillian, and Sara Espinosa

Vulvar cancer is annually diagnosed in an estimated 6,470 individuals and the vast majority are histologically squamous cell carcinomas. Vulvar cancer accounts for 5% to 8% of gynecologic malignancies. Known risk factors for vulvar cancer include increasing age, infection with human papillomavirus, cigarette smoking, inflammatory conditions affecting the vulva, and immunodeficiency. Most vulvar neoplasias are diagnosed at early stages. Rarer histologies exist and include melanoma, extramammary Paget’s disease, Bartholin gland adenocarcinoma, verrucous carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and sarcoma. This manuscript discusses recommendations outlined in the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for treatments, surveillance, systemic therapy options, and gynecologic survivorship.