Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 13 items for

  • Author: Jessica Altman x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Karen E. Kinahan, Sheetal Kircher, Jessica Altman, Alfred Rademaker, John M. Salsman, Aarati Didwania, Bridget O'Brien, Alpa C. Patel and Stacy D. Sanford

Background: The “shared-care model” for patients with cancer involves care coordination between primary care providers (PCPs) and oncologists, with the goal of optimizing survivorship care. However, a high proportion of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors do not have a PCP. Study objectives were to increase the percentage of AYAs with a PCP documented in the electronic medical record (EMR) via the use of a best practice advisory (BPA) or “stopgap” intervention; to increase communication between providers by the number of routed clinic notes; and to assess oncology providers' attitudes/beliefs about the model and intervention. Methods: Data were collected for the 6 months before implementation of the BPA to determine the percentage of AYAs with a PCP and the number of notes routed to providers (time point 1 [T1]). The same data were collected at time point 2 (T2) after the BPA had been implemented for 6 months. Oncology providers participated in an education video module and an online survey at T1 and a survey at T2. Results: At T1, 47.1% of 756 AYAs had a documented PCP in the EMR. At T2, the percentage increased to 55.1% (P<.002). The number of routed notes did not change significantly from T1 to T2. Providers that completed the intervention survey agreed/strongly agreed that the shared-care model is a desirable model of care (T1 = 86%; T2 = 93%) and that a BPA is useful for facilitating PCP referrals (T1 = 76%; T2 = 39%). Conclusions: This BPA is feasible for increasing the percentage of AYAs with a PCP documented in the EMR and could potentially lead to increased PCP referral and communication among providers for the benefit of long-term survivorship care. Providers generally agree with the shared-care model; however, the BPA implementation requires modification.

Full access

Susan O'Brien, Camille N. Abboud, Mojtaba Akhtari, Jessica Altman, Ellin Berman, Daniel J. DeAngelo, Steven Devine, Amir T. Fathi, Jason Gotlib, Madan Jagasia, Joseph O. Moore, Javier Pinilla-Ibarz, Jerald P. Radich, Vishnu V.B. Reddy, Neil P. Shah, Paul J. Shami, B. Douglas Smith, David S. Snyder, Meir Wetzler and Furhan Yunus

Full access

Margaret R. O'Donnell, Camille N. Abboud, Jessica Altman, Frederick R. Appelbaum, Steven E. Coutre, Lloyd E. Damon, James M. Foran, Salil Goorha, Lori J. Maness, Guido Marcucci, Peter Maslak, Michael M. Millenson, Joseph O. Moore, Farhad Ravandi, Paul J. Shami, B. Douglas Smith, Richard M. Stone, Stephen A. Strickland, Martin S. Tallman and Eunice S. Wang

Overview In 2010, approximately 12,330 people were diagnosed with and 8950 died of acute myeloid leukemia (AML).1 As the population ages, the incidence of AML, along with myelodysplasia, seems to be rising. Equally disturbing is the increasing incidence of treatment-related myelodysplasia and leukemia in survivors of childhood tumors and young adulthood, such as Hodgkin disease, sarcomas, breast and testicular cancers, and lymphomas. Ionizing radiation and occupational exposure to benzene and petrochemicals are also associated with AML.2 The NCCN AML Panel convenes annually to update guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of AML in adults. Clinical trials have led to significant improvements in treatment in some areas, primarily in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). However, recent large clinical trials have highlighted the need for new, innovative strategies because outcomes for patients, particularly older patients, have not substantially changed in the past 3 decades. The panel has focused on outlining reasonable treatment options based on recent clinical trials and data from basic science, which may identify new risk factors and treatment approaches. In some areas, panel members have divergent opinions about the relative risks and benefits of various treatment options. Therefore, these guidelines attempt to provide a rationale for the inclusion of several treatment options in some categories. Initial Evaluation Initial evaluation has 2 objectives. The first is to characterize the disease process, including factors such as 1) prior toxic exposure, 2) myelodysplasia, and 3) karyotypic or molecular abnormalities, which may provide prognostic information that could influence responsiveness to chemotherapy and risk of...
Full access

Susan O’Brien, Jerald P. Radich, Camille N. Abboud, Mojtaba Akhtari, Jessica K. Altman, Ellin Berman, Peter Curtin, Daniel J. DeAngelo, Michael Deininger, Steven Devine, Amir T. Fathi, Jason Gotlib, Madan Jagasia, Patricia Kropf, Joseph O. Moore, Arnel Pallera, Vishnu VB. Reddy, Neil P. Shah, B. Douglas Smith, David S. Snyder, Meir Wetzler, Kristina Gregory and Hema Sundar

Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is usually diagnosed in the chronic phase. Untreated chronic phase CML will eventually progress to advanced phase (accelerated or blast phase) CML. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been shown to induce favorable response rates in patients with accelerated and blast phase CML. The addition of TKIs to chemotherapy has also been associated with improved outcomes in patients with blast phase CML. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant remains a potentially curative option for patients with advanced phase CML, although treatment with a course of TKIs will be beneficial as a bridge to transplant. This manuscript discusses the recommendations outlined in the NCCN Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of patients with advanced phase CML.

Full access

Margaret R. O'Donnell, Camille N. Abboud, Jessica Altman, Frederick R. Appelbaum, Daniel A. Arber, Eyal Attar, Uma Borate, Steven E. Coutre, Lloyd E. Damon, Salil Goorha, Jeffrey Lancet, Lori J. Maness, Guido Marcucci, Michael M. Millenson, Joseph O. Moore, Farhad Ravandi, Paul J. Shami, B. Douglas Smith, Richard M. Stone, Stephen A. Strickland, Martin S. Tallman, Eunice S. Wang, Maoko Naganuma and Kristina M. Gregory

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains the most common form of acute leukemia among adults and accounts for the largest number of annual deaths due to leukemias in the United States. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for AML provide recommendations on the diagnostic evaluation and workup for AML, risk assessment based on cytogenetic and molecular features, treatment options for induction and consolidation therapies for younger and older (age ≥ 65 years) adult patients, and key supportive care considerations.

Full access

Peter F. Coccia, Jessica Altman, Smita Bhatia, Scott C. Borinstein, Joseph Flynn, Suzanne George, Robert Goldsby, Robert Hayashi, Mary S. Huang, Rebecca H. Johnson, Lynda Kwon Beaupin, Michael P. Link, Kevin C. Oeffinger, Kathleen M. Orr, Alberto S. Pappo, Damon Reed, Holly L. Spraker, Deborah A. Thomas, Margaret von Mehren, Daniel S. Wechsler, Kimberly F. Whelan, Bradley J. Zebrack, Hema Sundar and Dorothy A. Shead

Cancer is the leading cause of death among the adolescent and young adult (AYA) population, excluding homicide, suicide, or unintentional injury. AYA patients should be managed by a multidisciplinary team of health care professionals who are well-versed in the specific developmental issues relevant to this patient population. The recommendations for age-appropriate care outlined in these NCCN Guidelines include psychosocial assessment, a discussion of infertility risks associated with treatment and options for fertility preservation, genetic and familial risk assessment for all patients after diagnosis, screening and monitoring of late effects in AYA cancer survivors after successful completion of therapy, and palliative care and end-of-life considerations for patients for whom curative therapy fails.

Full access

Susan O’Brien, Jerald P. Radich, Camille N. Abboud, Mojtaba Akhtari, Jessica K. Altman, Ellin Berman, Daniel J. DeAngelo, Michael Deininger, Steven Devine, Amir T. Fathi, Jason Gotlib, Madan Jagasia, Patricia Kropf, Joseph O. Moore, Arnel Pallera, Javier Pinilla-Ibarz, Vishnu VB. Reddy, Neil P. Shah, B. Douglas Smith, David S. Snyder, Meir Wetzler, Kristina Gregory and Hema Sundar

The 2014 NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia recommend quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) standardized to International Scale (IS) as the preferred method for monitoring molecular response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy. A BCR-ABL1 transcript level of 10% or less (IS) is now included as the response milestone at 3 and 6 months. Change of therapy to an alternate TKI is recommended for patients with BCR-ABL1 transcript levels greater than 10% (IS) at 3 months after primary treatment with imatinib. Continuing the same dose of TKI or switching to an alternate TKI are options for patients with BCR-ABL1 transcript levels greater than 10% (IS) at 3 months after primary treatment with dasatinib or nilotinib. The guidelines recommend 6-month evaluation with QPCR (IS) for patients with BCR-ABL1 transcript levels greater than 10% at 3 months. Monitoring with QPCR (IS) every 3 months is recommended for all patients, including those who meet response milestones at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months (BCR-ABL1 transcript level ≤10% [IS] at 3 and 6 months, complete cytogenetic response at 12 and 18 months).

Full access

Jerald P. Radich, Michael Deininger, Camille N. Abboud, Jessica K. Altman, Ellin Berman, Ravi Bhatia, Bhavana Bhatnagar, Peter Curtin, Daniel J. DeAngelo, Jason Gotlib, Gabriela Hobbs, Madan Jagasia, Hagop M. Kantarjian, Lori Maness, Leland Metheny, Joseph O. Moore, Arnel Pallera, Philip Pancari, Mrinal Patnaik, Enkhtsetseg Purev, Michal G. Rose, Neil P. Shah, B. Douglas Smith, David S. Snyder, Kendra L. Sweet, Moshe Talpaz, James Thompson, David T. Yang, Kristina M. Gregory and Hema Sundar

Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is defined by the presence of Philadelphia chromosome (Ph), resulting from a reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 [t(9;22] that gives rise to a BCR-ABL1 fusion gene. CML occurs in 3 different phases (chronic, accelerated, and blast phase) and is usually diagnosed in the chronic phase. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy is a highly effective first-line treatment option for all patients with newly diagnosed chronic phase CML (CP-CML). The selection TKI therapy should be based on the risk score, toxicity profile of TKI, patient's age, ability to tolerate therapy, and the presence of comorbid conditions. This manuscript discusses the recommendations outlined in the NCCN Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of patients with CP-CML.

Full access

Margaret R. O’Donnell, Martin S. Tallman, Camille N. Abboud, Jessica K. Altman, Frederick R. Appelbaum, Daniel A. Arber, Eyal Attar, Uma Borate, Steven E. Coutre, Lloyd E. Damon, Jeffrey Lancet, Lori J. Maness, Guido Marcucci, Michael G. Martin, Michael M. Millenson, Joseph O. Moore, Farhad Ravandi, Paul J. Shami, B. Douglas Smith, Richard M. Stone, Stephen A. Strickland, Eunice S. Wang, Kristina M. Gregory and Maoko Naganuma

These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize several key updates to the NCCN Guidelines for Acute Myeloid Leukemia and discuss the clinical evidence that support the recommendations. The updates described in this article focus on the acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) section, featuring recommendations for additional induction/consolidation regimens in patients with low- or intermediate-risk APL, and providing guidance on maintenance strategies for APL.

Full access

Peter F. Coccia, Alberto S. Pappo, Jessica Altman, Smita Bhatia, Scott C. Borinstein, Joseph Flynn, A. Lindsay Frazier, Suzanne George, Robert Goldsby, Robert Hayashi, Mary S. Huang, Rebecca H. Johnson, Lynda Kwon Beaupin, Michael P. Link, Kevin C. Oeffinger, Kathleen M. Orr, Damon Reed, Holly L. Spraker, Deborah A. Thomas, Margaret von Mehren, Daniel S. Wechsler, Kimberly F. Whelan, Brad Zebrack, Dorothy A. Shead and Hema Sundar

The NCCN Guidelines Insights on Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Oncology discuss the fertility and endocrine issues that are relevant to the management of AYA patients with cancer. Fertility preservation should be an essential part in the treatment of AYA patients with cancer. The NCCN Guidelines recommend discussion of fertility preservation and contraception before the start of treatment. Oophoropexy and embryo cryopreservation are the 2 established options for fertility preservation in women. Semen cryopreservation before the start of treatment is the most reliable and well-established method of preserving fertility in men. AYA women with cancer also have unique contraception needs, depending on the type of cancer, its treatment, and treatment-related complications. Management of cancer during pregnancy poses significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenges for both the patient and the physician. AYA women diagnosed with cancer during pregnancy require individualized treatment from a multidisciplinary team involving medical, surgical, radiation, and gynecologic oncologists; obstetricians; and perinatologists.