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Jean F. Botha and Alan N. Langnas

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide and the most common primary hepatic malignancy. It arises on a background of hepatic cirrhosis in approximately 95% of the cases in the United States. A wide variety of treatment modalities have been applied in the treatment of HCC. Liver transplantation has emerged as the preferred treatment for patients with small HCC. Transplantation for patients whose tumors do not exceed the Milan criteria yields results equivalent to those of transplantation for non-HCC indications. Controversy now exists regarding the use of living donors, expansion of selection criteria, and role of adjuvant therapy.

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B. Daniel Campos and Jean F. Botha

Edited by Kerrin G. Robinson

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cholangiocarcinoma represent more than 95% of primary hepatic malignancies in adults. The incidence of both seems to be rising. Any form of cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis represent independent risk factors for the development of HCC and cholangiocarcinoma, respectively. The surgical treatment of these malignancies has evolved significantly in the past decade, and liver transplantation (LT) has revolutionized the prognosis of these conditions. Provided both malignancies are diagnosed early in their natural history, LT offers a greater than 75% chance of survival at 4 years. This is a remarkable improvement in the treatment of primary hepatic malignancies and compares favorably with any other form of treatment, including partial liver resection. The application of specific pretransplantation staging criteria, along with the addition of neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy for cholangiocarcinoma, has made these results possible. The development of living donor LT further expands the treatment horizon for both diseases. It also lessens the impact of the scarcity of available deceased donor organs available for transplantation. The future challenge is to better characterize biologic staging/prognostic indicators that could expand the understanding and success in treating both malignancies.

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Al B. Benson III, Thomas A. Abrams, Edgar Ben-Josef, P. Mark Bloomston, Jean F. Botha, Bryan M. Clary, Anne Covey, Steven A. Curley, Michael I. D'Angelica, Rene Davila, William D. Ensminger, John F. Gibbs, Daniel Laheru, Mokenge P. Malafa, Jorge Marrero, Steven G. Meranze, Sean J. Mulvihill, James O. Park, James A. Posey, Jasgit Sachdev, Riad Salem, Elin R. Sigurdson, Constantinos Sofocleous, Jean-Nicolas Vauthey, Alan P. Venook, Laura Williams Goff, Yun Yen and Andrew X. Zhu

Hepatobiliary Cancers Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology NCCN Categories of Evidence and Consensus Category 1: The recommendation is based on high-level evidence (e.g., randomized controlled trials) and there is uniform NCCN consensus. Category 2A: The recommendation is based on lower-level evidence and there is uniform NCCN consensus. Category 2B: The recommendation is based on lower-level evidence and there is nonuniform NCCN consensus (but no major disagreement). Category 3: The recommendation is based on any level of evidence but reflects major disagreement. All recommendations are category 2A unless otherwise noted. Clinical trials: The NCCN believes that the best management for any cancer patient is in a clinical trial. Participation in clinical trials is especially encouraged. Overview Hepatobiliary cancers are highly lethal. In 2008, approximately 21,370 persons in the United States were estimated to be diagnosed with liver or intrahepatic bile duct cancer and 9520 with gallbladder cancer or other biliary tract cancer. Furthermore, approximately 18,410 deaths from liver or intrahepatic bile duct cancer and 3340 deaths from gallbladder cancer or other biliary tract cancer were estimated to occur.1 The types of hepatobiliary cancers covered in these guidelines include hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), gallbladder cancer, intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, and extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. By definition, these guidelines cannot incorporate all possible clinical variations and are not intended to replace good clinical judgment or individualization of treatments. Although not explicitly stated at every decision point of the guidelines, patient participation in prospective clinical trials is the preferred option for treatment of hepatobiliary cancers. HCC Risk Factors and...