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A Brief Review of Pharmacotherapies for Smoking Cessation

Cho Y. Lam, Jennifer A. Minnix, Jason D. Robinson, and Paul M. Cinciripini

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Clinical Practice Guidelines have established both nicotine and nonnicotine-based pharmacotherapies as efficacious treatments for smoking cessation. Smokers attempting to quit smoking can significantly increase their chances by using one of several first-line agents, including nicotine transdermal patches, gum, nasal spray, inhalers, tablets, and the antidepressant bupropion. Those who cannot use either bupropion or nicotine replacement therapy because of contraindications or lack of effectiveness may benefit from the second-line treatment nortriptyline. This article also discusses several novel compounds for smoking cessation.

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Multiple Myeloma, Version 2.2024, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology

Shaji K. Kumar, Natalie S. Callander, Kehinde Adekola, Larry D. Anderson Jr, Muhamed Baljevic, Rachid Baz, Erica Campagnaro, Jorge J. Castillo, Caitlin Costello, Christopher D’Angelo, Srinivas Devarakonda, Noura Elsedawy, Alfred Garfall, Kelly Godby, Jens Hillengass, Leona Holmberg, Myo Htut, Carol Ann Huff, Malin Hultcrantz, Yubin Kang, Sarah Larson, Hans C. Lee, Michaela Liedtke, Thomas Martin, James Omel, Timothy Robinson, Aaron Rosenberg, Douglas Sborov, Mark A. Schroeder, Daniel Sherbenou, Attaya Suvannasankha, Jason Valent, Asya Nina Varshavsky-Yanovsky, Rashmi Kumar, and Jenna Snedeker

The treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (MM) has evolved to include several new options. These include new combinations with second generation proteasome inhibitors (PI); second generation immunomodulators, monoclonal antibodies, CAR T cells, bispecific antibodies, selinexor, venetoclax, and many others. Most patients with MM undergo several cycles of remissions and relapse, and therefore need multiple lines of combination therapies. Selecting treatment options for relapsed/refractory MM requires consideration of resistance status to specific classes, and patient-specific factors such as age and other comorbidities should be considered. The NCCN Guidelines for MM provide a framework on which to base decisions regarding workup, treatment, and follow-up of newly diagnosed and previously treated MM. This manuscript outlines the recommendations from NCCN Guidelines for MM specific to relapsed/refractory disease.

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Waldenström Macroglobulinemia/Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma, Version 2.2024, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology

Shaji K. Kumar, Natalie S. Callander, Kehinde Adekola, Larry D. Anderson Jr, Muhamed Baljevic, Rachid Baz, Erica Campagnaro, Jorge J. Castillo, Caitlin Costello, Christopher D’Angelo, Benjamin Derman, Srinivas Devarakonda, Noura Elsedawy, Alfred Garfall, Kelly Godby, Jens Hillengass, Leona Holmberg, Myo Htut, Carol Ann Huff, Malin Hultcrantz, Yubin Kang, Sarah Larson, Hans Lee, Michaela Liedtke, Thomas Martin, James Omel, Timothy Robinson, Aaron Rosenberg, Douglas Sborov, Mark A. Schroeder, Daniel Sherbenou, Attaya Suvannasankha, Jason Valent, Asya Nina Varshavsky-Yanovsky, Jenna Snedeker, and Rashmi Kumar

The treatment of Waldenström macroglobulinemia/lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (WM/LPL) has evolved to include several new options. The NCCN Guidelines for WM/LPL provide a framework on which to base decisions regarding diagnosis, treatment, assessment of response to treatment, and follow-up of both newly diagnosed and previously treated WM/LPL.