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Peter L. Greenberg, Eyal Attar, John M. Bennett, Clara D. Bloomfield, Carlos M. De Castro, H. Joachim Deeg, James M. Foran, Karin Gaensler, Guillermo Garcia-Manero, Steven D. Gore, David Head, Rami Komrokji, Lori J. Maness, Michael Millenson, Stephen D. Nimer, Margaret R. O'Donnell, Mark A. Schroeder, Paul J. Shami, Richard M. Stone, James E. Thompson and Peter Westervelt

Overview The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represent myeloid clonal hemopathies with relatively heterogeneous spectrums of presentation. The major clinical problems in these disorders are morbidities caused by cytopenias and the potential for MDS to evolve into acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the general population, MDS occur in 5 per 100,000 people. However, among individuals older than 70 years, the incidence increases to between 22 and 45 per 100,000 and increases further with age. Managing MDS is complicated by the generally advanced age of the patients (median ages, 65–70 years), attendant nonhematologic comorbidities, and relative inability to tolerate certain intensive forms of therapy among older patients. In addition, when the illness progresses to AML, these patients experience lower response rates to standard therapy than those with de novo AML.1 Diagnostic Classification Initial evaluation of patients with suspected MDS requires careful assessment of their peripheral blood smear and blood counts, marrow morphology, duration of their abnormal blood counts, other potential causes for their cytopenias, and concomitant illnesses. The French-American-British (FAB) classification initially categorized patients for the diagnostic evaluation of MDS.2 Dysplastic changes in at least 2 of the 3 hematopoietic cell lines have been used by most histopathologists to diagnose MDS. These changes include megaloblastoid erythropoiesis, nucleocytoplasmic asynchrony in the early myeloid and erythroid precursors, and dysmorphic megakaryocytes.3 Patients with MDS are classified as having 1 of 5 subtypes of disease: refractory anemia (RA); RA with ringed sideroblasts (RARS); RA with excess of blasts (RAEB); RAEB in transformation (RAEB-T); or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia...
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Margaret R. O'Donnell, Camille N. Abboud, Jessica Altman, Frederick R. Appelbaum, Steven E. Coutre, Lloyd E. Damon, James M. Foran, Salil Goorha, Lori J. Maness, Guido Marcucci, Peter Maslak, Michael M. Millenson, Joseph O. Moore, Farhad Ravandi, Paul J. Shami, B. Douglas Smith, Richard M. Stone, Stephen A. Strickland, Martin S. Tallman and Eunice S. Wang

Overview In 2010, approximately 12,330 people were diagnosed with and 8950 died of acute myeloid leukemia (AML).1 As the population ages, the incidence of AML, along with myelodysplasia, seems to be rising. Equally disturbing is the increasing incidence of treatment-related myelodysplasia and leukemia in survivors of childhood tumors and young adulthood, such as Hodgkin disease, sarcomas, breast and testicular cancers, and lymphomas. Ionizing radiation and occupational exposure to benzene and petrochemicals are also associated with AML.2 The NCCN AML Panel convenes annually to update guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of AML in adults. Clinical trials have led to significant improvements in treatment in some areas, primarily in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). However, recent large clinical trials have highlighted the need for new, innovative strategies because outcomes for patients, particularly older patients, have not substantially changed in the past 3 decades. The panel has focused on outlining reasonable treatment options based on recent clinical trials and data from basic science, which may identify new risk factors and treatment approaches. In some areas, panel members have divergent opinions about the relative risks and benefits of various treatment options. Therefore, these guidelines attempt to provide a rationale for the inclusion of several treatment options in some categories. Initial Evaluation Initial evaluation has 2 objectives. The first is to characterize the disease process, including factors such as 1) prior toxic exposure, 2) myelodysplasia, and 3) karyotypic or molecular abnormalities, which may provide prognostic information that could influence responsiveness to chemotherapy and risk of...
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Jeffrey Crawford, James Armitage, Lodovico Balducci, Charles Bennett, Douglas W. Blayney, Spero R. Cataland, David C. Dale, George D. Demetri, Harry P. Erba, James Foran, Alison G. Freifeld, Marti Goemann, Mark L. Heaney, Sally Htoy, Susan Hudock, Dwight D. Kloth, David J. Kuter, Gary H. Lyman, Laura Boehnke Michaud, Sarah C. Miyata, Martin S. Tallman, Saroj Vadhan-Raj, Peter Westervelt and Michael K. Wong

Myeloid Growth Factors Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology NCCN Categories of Evidence and Consensus Category 1: The recommendation is based on high-level evidence (e.g., randomized controlled trials) and there is uniform NCCN consensus. Category 2A: The recommendation is based on lower-level evidence and there is uniform NCCN consensus. Category 2B: The recommendation is based on lower-level evidence and there is nonuniform NCCN consensus (but no major disagreement). Category 3: The recommendation is based on any level of evidence but reflects major disagreement. All recommendations are category 2A unless otherwise noted. Clinical trials: The NCCN believes that the best management for any cancer patient is in a clinical trial. Participation in clinical trials is especially encouraged. Overview Neutropenia (< 500 neutrophils/mcL or < 1000 neutrophils/mcL and a predicted decline to ≤ 500/mcL over the next 48 hours) and resulting febrile neutropenia (FN; ≥ 38.3°C orally or ≥ 38.0°C over 1 hour) can be induced by myelosuppressive chemotherapy. FN is a major dose-limiting toxicity of chemotherapy, often necessitating hospitalization for evaluation and empiric broad-spectrum antibiotics. These complications often result in dose reductions or treatment delays, which may compromise clinical outcomes. The prophylactic use of colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) can reduce the risk, severity, and duration of FN. Despite these benefits, CSFs are not administered to all patients under going myelosuppressive chemotherapy because of the costs associated with routine use. Selective use of CSFs in patients at increased risk for neutropenic complications may, however, enhance cost-effectiveness by directing treatment toward patients most likely to...
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Margaret R. O'Donnell, Martin S. Tallman, Camille N. Abboud, Jessica K. Altman, Frederick R. Appelbaum, Daniel A. Arber, Vijaya Bhatt, Dale Bixby, William Blum, Steven E. Coutre, Marcos De Lima, Amir T. Fathi, Melanie Fiorella, James M. Foran, Steven D. Gore, Aric C. Hall, Patricia Kropf, Jeffrey Lancet, Lori J. Maness, Guido Marcucci, Michael G. Martin, Joseph O. Moore, Rebecca Olin, Deniz Peker, Daniel A. Pollyea, Keith Pratz, Farhad Ravandi, Paul J. Shami, Richard M. Stone, Stephen A. Strickland, Eunice S. Wang, Matthew Wieduwilt, Kristina Gregory and Ndiya Ogba

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common form of acute leukemia among adults and accounts for the largest number of annual deaths due to leukemias in the United States. This portion of the NCCN Guidelines for AML focuses on management and provides recommendations on the workup, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment options for younger (age <60 years) and older (age ≥60 years) adult patients.

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Martin S. Tallman, Eunice S. Wang, Jessica K. Altman, Frederick R. Appelbaum, Vijaya Raj Bhatt, Dale Bixby, Steven E. Coutre, Marcos De Lima, Amir T. Fathi, Melanie Fiorella, James M. Foran, Aric C. Hall, Meagan Jacoby, Jeffrey Lancet, Thomas W. LeBlanc, Gabriel Mannis, Guido Marcucci, Michael G. Martin, Alice Mims, Margaret R. O’Donnell, Rebecca Olin, Deniz Peker, Alexander Perl, Daniel A. Pollyea, Keith Pratz, Thomas Prebet, Farhad Ravandi, Paul J. Shami, Richard M. Stone, Stephen A. Strickland, Matthew Wieduwilt, Kristina M. Gregory, OCN, Lydia Hammond and Ndiya Ogba

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common form of acute leukemia among adults and accounts for the largest number of annual deaths due to leukemias in the United States. Recent advances have resulted in an expansion of treatment options for AML, especially concerning targeted therapies and low-intensity regimens. This portion of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for AML focuses on the management of AML and provides recommendations on the workup, diagnostic evaluation and treatment options for younger (age <60 years) and older (age ≥60 years) adult patients.