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Ernest S. Han and Mark Wakabayashi

Epithelial ovarian cancer is often diagnosed in advanced stages and typically managed with surgical debulking followed by chemotherapy. For patients with presumed early-stage ovarian cancer, comprehensive surgical staging is essential for management, because 31% are upstaged. Over the past 15 years, minimally invasive techniques have improved and are increasingly being used to treat patients with ovarian cancer. Currently, only retrospective data support laparoscopic staging of patients with a suspicious adnexal mass or those surgically diagnosed with presumed early-stage ovarian cancer. Laparoscopy is also used in patients undergoing second-look procedures and to help evaluate whether patients should undergo optimal tumor debulking procedures or be initially managed with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Randomized clinical studies are needed to further support the role of minimally invasive surgery in the treatment of ovarian cancer.

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Thanh H. Dellinger, Amy A. Hakim, Stephen J. Lee, Mark T. Wakabayashi, Robert J. Morgan and Ernest S. Han

Vulvar cancer is a rare malignancy with high curability in early-stage disease, yet poor outcomes for advanced-stage and recurrent disease. Surgical management is at the cornerstone of treatment for most vulvar cancers, and includes conservative and radical resection of the primary vulvar tumor and excision of local lymph nodes, which are major prognostic factors and drive adjuvant treatment. This review summarizes the surgical management of primary squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva, specifically initial treatment guidelines by stage, based on the 2017 NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Vulvar Cancer.

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Wui-Jin Koh, Benjamin E. Greer, Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum, Susana M. Campos, Kathleen R. Cho, Hye Sook Chon, Christina Chu, David Cohn, Marta Ann Crispens, Don S. Dizon, Oliver Dorigo, Patricia J. Eifel, Christine M. Fisher, Peter Frederick, David K. Gaffney, Ernest Han, Susan Higgins, Warner K. Huh, John R. Lurain III, Andrea Mariani, David Mutch, Christa Nagel, Larissa Nekhlyudov, Amanda Nickles Fader, Steven W. Remmenga, R. Kevin Reynolds, Todd Tillmanns, Stefanie Ueda, Fidel A. Valea, Emily Wyse, Catheryn M. Yashar, Nicole McMillian and Jillian Scavone

Vulvar cancer is a rare gynecologic malignancy. Ninety percent of vulvar cancers are predominantly squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), which can arise through human papilloma virus (HPV)–dependent and HPV-independent pathways. The NCCN Vulvar Cancer panel is an interdisciplinary group of representatives from NCCN Member Institutions consisting of specialists in gynecological oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and pathology. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Vulvar Cancer provide an evidence- and consensus-based approach for the management of patients with vulvar SCC. This manuscript discusses the recommendations outlined in the NCCN Guidelines for diagnosis, staging, treatment, and follow-up.

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Wui-Jin Koh, Benjamin E. Greer, Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum, Sachin M. Apte, Susana M. Campos, Kathleen R. Cho, Christina Chu, David Cohn, Marta Ann Crispens, Don S. Dizon, Oliver Dorigo, Patricia J. Eifel, Christine M. Fisher, Peter Frederick, David K. Gaffney, Suzanne George, Ernest Han, Susan Higgins, Warner K. Huh, John R. Lurain III, Andrea Mariani, David Mutch, Amanda Nickles Fader, Steven W. Remmenga, R. Kevin Reynolds, Todd Tillmanns, Fidel A. Valea, Catheryn M. Yashar, Nicole R. McMillian and Jillian L. Scavone

The NCCN Guidelines for Uterine Neoplasms provide interdisciplinary recommendations for treating endometrial carcinoma and uterine sarcomas. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the NCCN Uterine Neoplasms Panel's 2016 discussions and major guideline updates for treating uterine sarcomas. During this most recent update, the panel updated the mesenchymal tumor classification to correspond with recent updates to the WHO tumor classification system. Additionally, the panel revised its systemic therapy recommendations to reflect new data and collective clinical experience. These NCCN Guidelines Insights elaborate on the rationale behind these recent changes.