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Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center

Oral cavity, pharyngeal, and laryngeal cancers account for about 3% of new cancer cases in the United States. Alcohol and tobacco abuse are common etiologic factors in some of these cancers. Moreover, because the entire aerodigestive tract epithelium may be exposed to these carcinogens, patients with head and neck cancer are at risk for developing second primary neoplasms. Stage at diagnosis is the most predictive factor of survival. Important new updates to the NCCN guidelines for 2008 include the addition of chemo/radiation therapy as an option in adjuvant treatment for several head and neck cancers and the addition of human papilloma virus testing to the workup. This version of the guidelines is limited to tumors arising in the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, nasopharynx, and glottic and supraglottic larynx. The complete version can be found on the NCCN Web site at www.nccn.org

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center

Venous thromboembolic disease is a common and life-threatening condition in cancer patients. Results from a recent retrospective study of 66,106 hospitalized adult neutropenic cancer patients showed that 2.74% to 12.10% of these patients, depending on the type of malignancy, experienced a venous thromboembolism (VTE) during first hospitalization. These guidelines specifically outline strategies to prevent and treat VTE in adult inpatients with either a diagnosis of cancer or for whom cancer is clinically suspected. These guidelines evaluate the therapeutic advantages of implementing pharmacologic anticoagulation measures based on both the perceived risk for bleeding (i.e., contraindications to anticoagulation) and the status of the cancer.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center

Ovarian neoplasms consist of several histopathologic entities, and treatment depends on the specific tumor type. Epithelial ovarian cancer comprises most malignant ovarian neoplasms; however, other pathologic subtypes (such as less common ovarian histopathologies) must be considered. These guidelines discuss epithelial ovarian cancer as well as less common ovarian histopathologies, including germ cell neoplasms, mixed müllerian tumors of the ovary, and ovarian stromal tumors.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org