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David H. Moore

More than 50% of patients with newly diagnosed cervical cancer will undergo radiation therapy as a primary treatment modality. Results from five phase III trials conducted by National Cancer Institute (NCI)-sponsored cooperative groups showed significant survival advantages from the addition of cisplatin-based chemotherapy to primary radiation therapy, changing the standard of care for patients with bulky or locally advanced cervical carcinoma. The majority of patients for whom treatment fails, however, have persistent pelvic disease. Other agents (alone or in combination with cisplatin) with potential synergy with radiation therapy should be studied. Future trials should investigate potential interrelationships between anemia, tumor hypoxia, angiogenesis, and the effectiveness of radiation therapy. Therapies specific to tumor hypoxia (tirapazamine) or strategies to maintain higher nadir hemoglobin levels during treatment (aggressive transfusion policies; erythropoietin) should also be studied.

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David H. Moore

When cervical cancer is beyond curative treatment with surgery or radiation therapy, the prognosis is poor and palliation is the primary objective. Early prospective studies identified cisplatin as an active drug for advanced, metastatic, or recurrent cervical cancer, and results with other platinum analogs seemed inferior to cisplatin. Several phase III trials have established the combination of cisplatin plus paclitaxel as standard therapy for comparison. Using pooled data from 3 Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) phase III studies, a predictive model was developed to better identify patients who are unlikely to respond to cisplatin-containing chemotherapy. The GOG is currently developing a phase III trial to investigate the impact of bevacizumab and a regimen containing topotecan instead of cisplatin in combination with paclitaxel chemotherapy and also to externally validate the predictive model. This study has the potential to radically change standard care for cervical cancer chemotherapy. Furthermore, if the predictive model is upheld, then patients with high risk factors for treatment failure may be directed to chemotherapy regimens that do not include cisplatin or to investigational trials.

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Jeffrey K. Belkora, David W. Hutton, Dan H. Moore and Laura A. Siminoff

Adjuvant! is a model that provides recurrence and mortality risk predictions for patients with breast cancer considering adjuvant therapies. Although low-risk patients who saw Adjuvant! chose adjuvant therapy less frequently, whether this was because of educational or other aspects of the decision aid is unknown. The authors explored whether Adjuvant! affects choice of therapy through increased patient knowledge. A subset of data were analyzed from a cluster randomized trial in which oncology practices in 2 major United States cities were randomly assigned to use either Adjuvant! or an informational pamphlet to educate patients. Of 405 patients, 48 were low-risk, with 28 assigned to the decision aid and 20 to the pamphlet. Among the low-risk patients, using frequency tables and Fisher exact tests, the authors explored whether Adjuvant! was associated with more accurate patient estimates of survival; whether accuracy was associated with treatment choice; and whether, after controlling for accuracy, any remaining association was seen between Adjuvant! and treatment choice. Adjuvant! was associated with more accurate estimates of baseline prognosis compared with the pamphlet (57% vs. 25%; P = .04). Patients who had more accurate estimates of baseline prognosis were less likely to choose adjuvant therapy (62% vs. 89%; P = .04). After controlling for accuracy, no statistically significant association was found between the use of Adjuvant! and adjuvant therapy (P = .59 and P = .11 for inaccurate and accurate patients, respectively). Adjuvant! seems to influence patient choice through educational rather than other means of persuasion. However, many patients held inaccurate risk perceptions after viewing Adjuvant!.

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Richard T. Hoppe, Ranjana H. Advani, Weiyun Z. Ai, Richard F. Ambinder, Celeste M. Bello, Philip J. Bierman, Kristie A. Blum, Bouthaina Dabaja, Ysabel Duron, Andres Forero, Leo I. Gordon, Francisco J. Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Ephraim P. Hochberg, David G. Maloney, David Mansur, Peter M. Mauch, Monika Metzger, Joseph O. Moore, David Morgan, Craig H. Moskowitz, Matthew Poppe, Barbara Pro, Lawrence Weiss, Jane N. Winter and Joachim Yahalom

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Richard T. Hoppe, Ranjana H. Advani, Weiyun Z. Ai, Richard F. Ambinder, Patricia Aoun, Celeste M. Bello, Philip J. Bierman, Kristie A. Blum, Robert Chen, Bouthaina Dabaja, Ysabel Duron, Andres Forero, Leo I. Gordon, Francisco J. Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Ephraim P. Hochberg, David G. Maloney, David Mansur, Peter M. Mauch, Monika Metzger, Joseph O. Moore, David Morgan, Craig H. Moskowitz, Matthew Poppe, Barbara Pro, Jane N. Winter, Joachim Yahalom and Hema Sundar

The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) include the clinical management of classical HL and lymphocyte-predominant HL (LPHL). Major changes have been incorporated into these guidelines since their inception. In the 2012 NCCN Guidelines for HL, PET scans are not recommended for interim restaging of patients with stage I to II favorable disease. After reevaluating the available evidence on the use of interim PET imaging, the panel recommends the use of diagnostic CT scan of involved sites for interim restaging after completion of chemotherapy for this group of patients. Maintenance rituximab for 2 years is included as an option for patients with stage IB to IIB or stage III to IV LPHL treated with rituximab alone in the first-line setting. Brentuximab vedotin is included as an option for patients with progressive disease or relapsed disease after second-line chemotherapy or high-dose therapy with autologous stem cell rescue.

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Richard T. Hoppe, Ranjana H. Advani, Weiyun Z. Ai, Richard F. Ambinder, Patricia Aoun, Celeste M. Bello, Cecil M. Benitez, Karl Bernat, Philip J. Bierman, Kristie A. Blum, Robert Chen, Bouthaina Dabaja, Andres Forero, Leo I. Gordon, Francisco J. Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Ephraim P. Hochberg, Jiayi Huang, Patrick B. Johnston, Mark S. Kaminski, Vaishalee P. Kenkre, Nadia Khan, David G. Maloney, Peter M. Mauch, Monika Metzger, Joseph O. Moore, David Morgan, Craig H. Moskowitz, Carolyn Mulroney, Matthew Poppe, Rachel Rabinovitch, Stuart Seropian, Mitchell Smith, Jane N. Winter, Joachim Yahalom, Jennifer Burns, Ndiya Ogba and Hema Sundar

This portion of the NCCN Guidelines for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) focuses on the management of classical HL. Current management of classical HL involves initial treatment with chemotherapy or combined modality therapy followed by restaging with PET/CT to assess treatment response using the Deauville criteria (5-point scale). The introduction of less toxic and more effective regimens has significantly advanced HL cure rates. However, long-term follow-up after completion of treatment is essential to determine potential long-term effects.

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Richard T. Hoppe, Ranjana H. Advani, Weiyun Z. Ai, Richard F. Ambinder, Patricia Aoun, Celeste M. Bello, Cecil M. Benitez, Philip J. Bierman, Kristie A. Blum, Robert Chen, Bouthaina Dabaja, Andres Forero, Leo I. Gordon, Francisco J. Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Ephraim P. Hochberg, Jiayi Huang, Patrick B. Johnston, Nadia Khan, David G. Maloney, Peter M. Mauch, Monika Metzger, Joseph O. Moore, David Morgan, Craig H. Moskowitz, Carolyn Mulroney, Matthew Poppe, Rachel Rabinovitch, Stuart Seropian, Christina Tsien, Jane N. Winter, Joachim Yahalom, Jennifer L. Burns and Hema Sundar

Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is an uncommon malignancy involving lymph nodes and the lymphatic system. Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) and nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma are the 2 main types of HL. CHL accounts for most HL diagnosed in the Western countries. Chemotherapy or combined modality therapy, followed by restaging with PET/CT to assess treatment response using the Deauville criteria (5-point scale), is the standard initial treatment for patients with newly diagnosed CHL. Brentuximab vedotin, a CD30-directed antibody-drug conjugate, has produced encouraging results in the treatment of relapsed or refractory disease. The potential long-term effects of treatment remain an important consideration, and long-term follow-up is essential after completion of treatment.

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Richard T. Hoppe, Ranjana H. Advani, Weiyun Z. Ai, Richard F. Ambinder, Patricia Aoun, Philippe Armand, Celeste M. Bello, Cecil M. Benitez, Philip J. Bierman, Robert Chen, Bouthaina Dabaja, Robert Dean, Andres Forero, Leo I. Gordon, Francisco J. Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Ephraim P. Hochberg, Jiayi Huang, Patrick B. Johnston, Mark S. Kaminski, Vaishalee P. Kenkre, Nadia Khan, Kami Maddocks, David G. Maloney, Monika Metzger, Joseph O. Moore, David Morgan, Craig H. Moskowitz, Carolyn Mulroney, Rachel Rabinovitch, Stuart Seropian, Randa Tao, Jane N. Winter, Joachim Yahalom, Jennifer L. Burns and Ndiya Ogba

The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) provide recommendations for the management of adult patients with HL. The NCCN Guidelines Panel meets at least annually to review comments from reviewers within the NCCN Member Institutions, examine relevant data, and reevaluate and update the recommendations. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize recent updates centered on treatment considerations for relapsed/refractory classic HL.