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Craig Brown, Sharon Ben-Or, Paul Walker, and Mark Bowling

Background: The Leo W. Jenkins Cancer Clinic has adopted a programmatic, multidisciplinary approach to thoracic tumors, which has involved the implementation of new therapeutic and diagnostic approaches. In 2012 we began using electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy (ENB) as a new diagnostic tool. ENB uses a guidance system that combines CT imaging with magnetic field–guided spatial information to allow tissue sampling or placement of fiducial markers to guide radiation therapy. Methods: The numbers of early-stage (I and II) and late-stage (III and IV) lung cancers were compared before and after the introduction of ENB. We also examined the number of cases of fiducial marker placement using bronchoscopy versus interventional radiology before and after ENB was introduced. Fisher's exact test was used to compare the early- versus late-stage lung cancers found at diagnosis pre- and post-ENB introduction, fiducial marker placements using interventional radiology versus bronchoscopy pre- and post-ENB introduction, and pneumothorax rates. Results: More early-stage cancers were diagnosed after ENB introduction (67 of 286 cases vs 116 of 290; P<.0001). Bronchoscopy was also used more frequently to place fiducial markers post-ENB (53 of 86 pre-ENB vs 105 of 117 post-ENB; P<.0001) and had a lower pneumothorax rate (4% vs 22%) than fiducial placement in interventional radiology (P<.001). Conclusions: The addition of ENB to a multidisciplinary thoracic oncology program may permit the diagnosis of lung cancer at an earlier stage and offers the ability to safely place fiducial markers for therapeutic purposes, such as radiation therapy, within the same procedure, potentially improving safety and decreasing time to treatment.

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Ndiya Ogba, Nicole M. Arwood, Nancy L. Bartlett, Mara Bloom, Patrick Brown, Christine Brown, Elizabeth Lihua Budde, Robert Carlson, Stephanie Farnia, Terry J. Fry, Morgan Garber, Rebecca A. Gardner, Lauren Gurschick, Patricia Kropf, Jeff J. Reitan, Craig Sauter, Bijal Shah, Elizabeth J. Shpall, and Steven T. Rosen

Patients with relapsed or refractory (R/R) cancers have a poor prognosis and limited treatment options. The recent approval of 2 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) autologous T-cell products for R/R B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma treatment is setting the stage for what is possible in other diseases. However, there are important factors that must be considered, including patient selection, toxicity management, and costs associated with CAR T-cell therapy. To begin to address these issues, NCCN organized a task force consisting of a multidisciplinary panel of experts in oncology, cancer center administration, and health policy, which met for the first time in March 2018. This report describes the current state of CAR T-cell therapy and future strategies that should be considered as the application of this novel immunotherapy expands and evolves.

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Donald A. Podoloff, Ranjana H. Advani, Craig Allred, Al B. Benson III, Elizabeth Brown, Harold J. Burstein, Robert W. Carlson, R. Edward Coleman, Myron S. Czuczman, Dominique Delbeke, Stephen B. Edge, David S. Ettinger, Frederic W. Grannis Jr., Bruce E. Hillner, John M. Hoffman, Krystyna Kiel, Ritsuko Komaki, Steven M. Larson, David A. Mankoff, Kenneth E. Rosenzweig, John M. Skibber, Joachim Yahalom, JQ Michael Yu, and Andrew D. Zelenetz

The use of positron emission tomography (PET) is increasing rapidly in the United States, with the most common use of PET scanning related to oncology. It is especially useful in the staging and management of lymphoma, lung cancer, and colorectal cancer, according to a panel of expert radiologists, surgeons, radiation oncologists, nuclear medicine physicians, medical oncologists, and general internists convened in November 2006 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. The Task Force was charged with reviewing existing data and developing clinical recommendations for the use of PET scans in the evaluation and management of breast cancer, colon cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, and lymphoma. This report summarizes the proceedings of this meeting, including discussions of the background of PET, possible future developments, and the role of PET in oncology. (JNCCN 2007;5(Suppl 1):S1–S22)