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Esophageal Cancer Clinical Practice Guidelines

City of Hope Cancer Center

Carcinomas originating in the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract (esophagus, gastroesophageal junction, and stomach) constitute a worldwide major health problem. Unfortunately, esophageal carcinoma is often diagnosed late, and most therapeutic approaches are palliative, although advances have been made in staging procedures and therapy. The guidelines emphasize that palpable advances have been made in the treatment of locoregional esophageal carcinoma. Similarly, endoscopic palliation of esophageal carcinoma has improved substantially because of improving technology.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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Gastric Cancer Clinical Practice Guidelines

City of Hope Cancer Center

Gastric carcinoma is rampant in many countries around the world. An estimated 36,380 new cases of upper GI carcinomas and 25,120 deaths from these tumors will occur in the United States in 2005. These guidelines provide a systematic approach to gastric cancer and discuss advances in staging procedures such as laparoscopy and endoscopic ultrasonography and in possible functional imaging techniques. The guidelines also discuss the new standard in the United States: combination chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the adjuvant setting for a select group of patients.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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Colorectal Cancer Screening Clinical Practice Guidelines

City of Hope Cancer Center

Colorectal cancer is the third most frequently diagnosed cancer in men and women in the United States. An estimated 104,950 new cases of colon cancer and 40,340 new cases of rectal cancer will occur in the United States in 2005. During the same year, an estimated 56,290 people will die from colon and rectal cancer. Because patients with localized colon cancer have a 90% 5-year survival rate, screening is a critical and particularly effective procedure for colorectal cancer prevention. Screening options include colonoscopy; combined fecal occult blood test (FOBT) and sigmoidoscopy; sigmoidoscopy alone; or double-contrast barium enema.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org