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Andrew R. Barsky, Christopher A. Ahern, Sriram Venigalla, Vivek Verma, Emily J. Anstadt, Christopher M. Wright, Ethan B. Ludmir, Christopher G. Berlind, William D. Lindsay, Surbhi Grover, Keith A. Cengel and Charles B. Simone II

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Jaffer A. Ajani, James S. Barthel, David J. Bentrem, Thomas A. D'Amico, Prajnan Das, Crystal S. Denlinger, Charles S. Fuchs, Hans Gerdes, Robert E. Glasgow, James A. Hayman, Wayne L. Hofstetter, David H. Ilson, Rajesh N. Keswani, Lawrence R. Kleinberg, W. Michael Korn, A. Craig Lockhart, Mary F. Mulcahy, Mark B. Orringer, Raymond U. Osarogiagbon, James A. Posey, Aaron R. Sasson, Walter J. Scott, Stephen Shibata, Vivian E. M. Strong, Thomas K. Varghese Jr., Graham Warren, Mary Kay Washington, Christopher Willett and Cameron D. Wright

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Jaffer A. Ajani, James S. Barthel, Tanios Bekaii-Saab, David J. Bentrem, Thomas A. D'Amico, Prajnan Das, Crystal Denlinger, Charles S. Fuchs, Hans Gerdes, James A. Hayman, Lisa Hazard, Wayne L. Hofstetter, David H. Ilson, Rajesh N. Keswani, Lawrence R. Kleinberg, Michael Korn, Kenneth Meredith, Mary F. Mulcahy, Mark B. Orringer, Raymond U. Osarogiagbon, James A. Posey, Aaron R. Sasson, Walter J. Scott, Stephen Shibata, Vivian E. M. Strong, Mary Kay Washington, Christopher Willett, Douglas E. Wood, Cameron D. Wright and Gary Yang

OverviewCancers originating in the esophagus, gastroesophageal junctions, and stomach constitute a major health problem worldwide. In the United States, 37,600 new diagnoses of and 25,150 deaths from upper gastrointestinal cancers were estimated in 2009.1 A dramatic shift in the location of upper gastrointestinal tumors has occurred in the United States,2 and changes in histology and location of them were observed in some parts of Europe.3,4 In countries in the Western Hemisphere, the most common sites of gastric cancer are the proximal lesser curvature, cardia, and gastroesophageal junction.2 These changing trends may also begin to occur in South America and Asia.EpidemiologyGastric cancer is rampant in many countries around the world. In Japan, it remains the most common type of cancer among men; in China, more new cases are diagnosed each year than in any other country. The incidence of gastric cancer, however, has been declining globally since World War II and it is one of the least common cancers in North America. By some estimates, it is the fourth most common cancer worldwide.5 In 2009, 21,130 new diagnoses of gastric cancer were estimated in the United States and 10,620 deaths expected.1 In developed countries, the incidence of gastric cancer originating from the cardia follows the distribution of esophageal cancer.6–8 Noncardia gastric adenocarcinoma has marked geographic variation, with countries such as Japan, Korea, China, Taiwan, Costa Rica, Peru, Brazil, Chile, and the former Soviet Union showing a high incidence.9 In contrast to the incidence trends in the West, nonproximal...
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Thomas W. Flaig, Philippe E. Spiess, Neeraj Agarwal, Rick Bangs, Stephen A. Boorjian, Mark K. Buyyounouski, Sam Chang, Tracy M. Downs, Jason A. Efstathiou, Terence Friedlander, Richard E. Greenberg, Khurshid A. Guru, Thomas Guzzo, Harry W. Herr, Jean Hoffman-Censits, Christopher Hoimes, Brant A. Inman, Masahito Jimbo, A. Karim Kader, Subodh M. Lele, Jeff Michalski, Jeffrey S. Montgomery, Lakshminarayanan Nandagopal, Lance C. Pagliaro, Sumanta K. Pal, Anthony Patterson, Elizabeth R. Plimack, Kamal S. Pohar, Mark A. Preston, Wade J. Sexton, Arlene O. Siefker-Radtke, Jonathan Tward, Jonathan L. Wright, Lisa A. Gurski and Alyse Johnson-Chilla

This selection from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Bladder Cancer focuses on the clinical presentation and workup of suspected bladder cancer, treatment of non–muscle-invasive urothelial bladder cancer, and treatment of metastatic urothelial bladder cancer because important updates have recently been made to these sections. Some important updates include recommendations for optimal treatment of non–muscle-invasive bladder cancer in the event of a bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) shortage and details about biomarker testing for advanced or metastatic disease. The systemic therapy recommendations for second-line or subsequent therapies have also been revised. Treatment and management of muscle-invasive, nonmetastatic disease is covered in the complete version of the NCCN Guidelines for Bladder Cancer available at NCCN.org. Additional topics covered in the complete version include treatment of nonurothelial histologies and recommendations for nonbladder urinary tract cancers such as upper tract urothelial carcinoma, urothelial carcinoma of the prostate, and primary carcinoma of the urethra.