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Ashwin Shinde, Richard Li, Arya Amini, Yi-Jen Chen, Mihaela Cristea, Wenge Wang, Mark Wakabyashi, Ernest Han, Catheryn Yashar, Kevin Albuquerque, Sushil Beriwal and Scott Glaser

Background: Vulvar cancer with pelvic nodal involvement is considered metastatic (M1) disease per AJCC staging. The role of definitive therapy and its resulting impact on survival have not been defined. Patients and Methods: Patients with pelvic lymph node–positive vulvar cancer diagnosed in 2009 through 2015 were evaluated from the National Cancer Database. Patients with known distant metastatic disease were excluded. Logistic regression was used to evaluate use of surgery and radiation therapy (RT). Overall survival (OS) was evaluated with log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards modeling (multivariate analysis [MVA]). A 2-month conditional landmark analysis was performed. Results: A total of 1,304 women met the inclusion criteria. Median follow-up was 38 months for survivors. Chemotherapy, RT, and surgery were used in 54%, 74%, and 62% of patients, respectively. Surgery was associated with prolonged OS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.58; P<.001) but had multiple significant differences in baseline characteristics compared with nonsurgical patients. In patients managed nonsurgically, RT was associated with prolonged OS (HR, 0.66; P=.019) in MVA. In patients undergoing surgery, RT was associated with better OS (3-year OS, 55% vs 48%; P=.033). Factors predicting use of RT were identified. MVA revealed that RT was associated with prolonged OS (HR, 0.75; P=.004). Conclusions: In this cohort of women with vulvar cancer and positive pelvic lymph nodes, use of RT was associated with prolonged survival in those who did not undergo surgery. Surgery followed by adjuvant RT was associated with prolonged survival compared with surgery alone.

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Wui-Jin Koh, Benjamin E. Greer, Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum, Sachin M. Apte, Susana M. Campos, Kathleen R. Cho, Christina Chu, David Cohn, Marta Ann Crispens, Don S. Dizon, Oliver Dorigo, Patricia J. Eifel, Christine M. Fisher, Peter Frederick, David K. Gaffney, Suzanne George, Ernest Han, Susan Higgins, Warner K. Huh, John R. Lurain III, Andrea Mariani, David Mutch, Amanda Nickles Fader, Steven W. Remmenga, R. Kevin Reynolds, Todd Tillmanns, Fidel A. Valea, Catheryn M. Yashar, Nicole R. McMillian and Jillian L. Scavone

The NCCN Guidelines for Uterine Neoplasms provide interdisciplinary recommendations for treating endometrial carcinoma and uterine sarcomas. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the NCCN Uterine Neoplasms Panel's 2016 discussions and major guideline updates for treating uterine sarcomas. During this most recent update, the panel updated the mesenchymal tumor classification to correspond with recent updates to the WHO tumor classification system. Additionally, the panel revised its systemic therapy recommendations to reflect new data and collective clinical experience. These NCCN Guidelines Insights elaborate on the rationale behind these recent changes.

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Wui-Jin Koh, Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum, Sarah Bean, Kristin Bradley, Susana M. Campos, Kathleen R. Cho, Hye Sook Chon, Christina Chu, David Cohn, Marta Ann Crispens, Shari Damast, Oliver Dorigo, Patricia J. Eifel, Christine M. Fisher, Peter Frederick, David K. Gaffney, Suzanne George, Ernest Han, Susan Higgins, Warner K. Huh, John R. Lurain III, Andrea Mariani, David Mutch, Christa Nagel, Larissa Nekhlyudov, Amanda Nickles Fader, Steven W. Remmenga, R. Kevin Reynolds, Todd Tillmanns, Stefanie Ueda, Emily Wyse, Catheryn M. Yashar, Nicole R. McMillian and Jillian L. Scavone

Endometrial carcinoma is a malignant epithelial tumor that forms in the inner lining, or endometrium, of the uterus. Endometrial carcinoma is the most common gynecologic malignancy. Approximately two-thirds of endometrial carcinoma cases are diagnosed with disease confined to the uterus. The complete NCCN Guidelines for Uterine Neoplasms provide recommendations for the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of endometrial cancer and uterine sarcoma. This manuscript discusses guiding principles for the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of early-stage endometrial carcinoma as well as evidence for these recommendations.

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Wui-Jin Koh, Benjamin E. Greer, Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum, Sachin M. Apte, Susana M. Campos, Kathleen R. Cho, Christina Chu, David Cohn, Marta Ann Crispens, Oliver Dorigo, Patricia J. Eifel, Christine M. Fisher, Peter Frederick, David K. Gaffney, Ernest Han, Warner K. Huh, John R. Lurain III, David Mutch, Amanda Nickles Fader, Steven W. Remmenga, R. Kevin Reynolds, Nelson Teng, Todd Tillmanns, Fidel A. Valea, Catheryn M. Yashar, Nicole R. McMillian and Jillian L. Scavone

The NCCN Guidelines for Cervical Cancer provide interdisciplinary recommendations for treating cervical cancer. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the NCCN Cervical Cancer Panel’s discussion and major guideline updates from 2014 and 2015. The recommended systemic therapy options for recurrent and metastatic cervical cancer were amended upon panel review of new survival data and the FDA’s approval of bevacizumab for treating late-stage cervical cancer. This article outlines relevant data and provides insight into panel decisions regarding various combination regimens. Additionally, a new section was added to provide additional guidance on key principles of evaluation and surgical staging in cervical cancer. This article highlights 2 areas of active investigation and debate from this new section: sentinel lymph node mapping and fertility-sparing treatment approaches.

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Wui-Jin Koh, Benjamin E. Greer, Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum, Susana M. Campos, Kathleen R. Cho, Hye Sook Chon, Christina Chu, David Cohn, Marta Ann Crispens, Don S. Dizon, Oliver Dorigo, Patricia J. Eifel, Christine M. Fisher, Peter Frederick, David K. Gaffney, Ernest Han, Susan Higgins, Warner K. Huh, John R. Lurain III, Andrea Mariani, David Mutch, Christa Nagel, Larissa Nekhlyudov, Amanda Nickles Fader, Steven W. Remmenga, R. Kevin Reynolds, Todd Tillmanns, Stefanie Ueda, Fidel A. Valea, Emily Wyse, Catheryn M. Yashar, Nicole McMillian and Jillian Scavone

Vulvar cancer is a rare gynecologic malignancy. Ninety percent of vulvar cancers are predominantly squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), which can arise through human papilloma virus (HPV)–dependent and HPV-independent pathways. The NCCN Vulvar Cancer panel is an interdisciplinary group of representatives from NCCN Member Institutions consisting of specialists in gynecological oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and pathology. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Vulvar Cancer provide an evidence- and consensus-based approach for the management of patients with vulvar SCC. This manuscript discusses the recommendations outlined in the NCCN Guidelines for diagnosis, staging, treatment, and follow-up.

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Wui-Jin Koh, Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum, Sarah Bean, Kristin Bradley, Susana M. Campos, Kathleen R. Cho, Hye Sook Chon, Christina Chu, Rachel Clark, David Cohn, Marta Ann Crispens, Shari Damast, Oliver Dorigo, Patricia J. Eifel, Christine M. Fisher, Peter Frederick, David K. Gaffney, Ernest Han, Warner K. Huh, John R. Lurain III, Andrea Mariani, David Mutch, Christa Nagel, Larissa Nekhlyudov, Amanda Nickles Fader, Steven W. Remmenga, R. Kevin Reynolds, Todd Tillmanns, Stefanie Ueda, Emily Wyse, Catheryn M. Yashar, Nicole R. McMillian and Jillian L. Scavone

Cervical cancer is a malignant epithelial tumor that forms in the uterine cervix. Most cases of cervical cancer are preventable through human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination, routine screening, and treatment of precancerous lesions. However, due to inadequate screening protocols in many regions of the world, cervical cancer remains the fourth-most common cancer in women globally. The complete NCCN Guidelines for Cervical Cancer provide recommendations for the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of cervical cancer. This manuscript discusses guiding principles for the workup, staging, and treatment of early stage and locally advanced cervical cancer, as well as evidence for these recommendations. For recommendations regarding treatment of recurrent or metastatic disease, please see the full guidelines on NCCN.org.