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Michael H. Levy, Anthony Back, Costantino Benedetti, J. Andrew Billings, Susan Block, Barry Boston, Eduardo Bruera, Sydney Dy, Catherine Eberle, Kathleen M. Foley, Sloan Beth Karver, Sara J. Knight, Sumathi Misra, Christine S. Ritchie, David Spiegel, Linda Sutton, Susan Urba, Jamie H. Von Roenn and Sharon M. Weinstein

Palliative Care Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology NCCN Categories of Evidence and Consensus Category 1: The recommendation is based on high-level evidence (e.g., randomized controlled trials) and there is uniform NCCN consensus. Category 2A: The recommendation is based on lower-level evidence and there is uniform NCCN consensus. Category 2B: The recommendation is based on lower-level evidence and there is nonuniform NCCN consensus (but no major disagreement). Category 3: The recommendation is based on any level of evidence but reflects major disagreement. All recommendations are category 2A unless otherwise noted. Clinical trials: The NCCN believes that the best management for any cancer patient is in a clinical trial. Participation in clinical trials is especially encouraged. Overview Palliative care is both a philosophy of care and an organized, highly structured system for delivering care to persons with life-threatening or debilitating illness. Palliative care is patient- and family-centered care that focuses on effective management of pain and other distressing symptoms, while incorporating psychosocial and spiritual care according to patient/family needs, values, beliefs, and cultures. The goal of palliative care is to prevent and relieve suffering and to support the best possible quality of life for patients and their families, regardless of disease stage or the need for other therapies. Palliative care can be delivered concurrently with life-prolonging care or as the main focus of care. The standards of palliative care are as follows: • Institutions should develop a process ensuring that all patients have access to palliative care services from the initial visit....
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Robert J. Motzer, Neeraj Agarwal, Clair Beard, Graeme B. Bolger, Barry Boston, Michael A. Carducci, Toni K. Choueiri, Robert A. Figlin, Mayer Fishman, Steven L. Hancock, Gary R. Hudes, Eric Jonasch, Anne Kessinger, Timothy M. Kuzel, Paul H. Lange, Ellis G. Levine, Kim A. Margolin, M. Dror Michaelson, Thomas Olencki, Roberto Pili, Bruce G. Redman, Cary N. Robertson, Lawrence H. Schwartz, Joel Sheinfeld and Jue Wang

Kidney Cancer Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology NCCN Categories of Evidence and Consensus Category 1: The recommendation is based on high-level evidence (e.g., randomized controlled trials) and there isuniform NCCN consensus. Category 2A: The recommendation is based on lower-level evidence and there is uniform NCCN consensus. Category 2B: The recommendation is based on lower-level evidence and there is nonuniform NCCN consensus (but no major disagreement). Category 3: The recommendation is based on any level of evidence but reflects major disagreement. All recommendations are category 2A unless otherwise noted. Clinical trials: The NCCN believes that the best management for any cancer patient is in a clinical trial. Participation in clinical trials is especially encouraged. Overview In 2008, an estimated 54,390 Americans were diagnosed with kidney cancer and 13,010 died of the disease in the United States.1 Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) comprises approximately 2% of all malignancies, with a median age at diagnosis of 65 years. The rate of RCC has increased 2% per year for the past 65 years. The reason for this increase is unknown. Approximately 90% of renal tumors are RCC, and 85% of these are clear cell tumors.2 Other, less-common cell types include papillary, chromophobe, and Bellini (collecting) duct tumors. Collecting duct carcinoma comprises fewer than 1% of all cases. Medullary renal carcinoma is a variant of collecting duct renal carcinoma and was initially described as occurring in patients who are sickle cell–trait positive. Smoking and obesity are among the risk factors for RCC development. Several hereditary types...
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Robert J. Motzer, Neeraj Agarwal, Clair Beard, Graeme B. Bolger, Barry Boston, Michael A. Carducci, Toni K. Choueiri, Robert A. Figlin, Mayer Fishman, Steven L. Hancock, Gary R. Hudes, Eric Jonasch, Anne Kessinger, Timothy M. Kuzel, Paul H. Lange, Ellis G. Levine, Kim A. Margolin, M. Dror Michaelson, Thomas Olencki, Roberto Pili, Bruce G. Redman, Cary N. Robertson, Lawrence H. Schwartz, Joel Sheinfeld and Jue Wang

Testicular Cancer Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology NCCN Categories of Evidence and Consensus Category 1: The recommendation is based on high-level evidence (e.g., randomized controlled trials) and there is uniform NCCN consensus. Category 2A: The recommendation is based on lower-level evidence and there is uniform NCCN consensus. Category 2B: The recommendation is based on lower-level evidence and there is nonuniform NCCN consensus (but no major disagreement). Category 3: The recommendation is based on any level of evidence but reflects major disagreement. All recommendations are category 2A unless otherwise noted. Clinical trials: The NCCN believes that the best management for any cancer patient is in a clinical trial. Participation in clinical trials is especially encouraged. Overview An estimated 8090 new cases of testicular cancer will be diagnosed in the United States in 2008.1 Germ cell tumors (GCTs) comprise 95% of malignant tumors arising in the testes. These tumors also occur occasionally in extragonadal primary sites, but they are still managed the same as testicular GCTs. Although GCTs are relatively uncommon tumors that comprise only 2% of all human malignancies, they constitute the most common solid tumor in men between the ages of 15 and 34 years. In addition, the worldwide incidence of these tumors has more than doubled in the past 40 years. Several risk factors for GCT development have been identified, including prior history, positive family history, cryptorchidism, testicular dysgenesis, and Klinefelter's syndrome. GCTs are classified as seminoma or nonseminoma. Nonseminomatous tumors often include multiple cell types, including embryonal cell...
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Robert Swarm, Amy Pickar Abernethy, Doralina L. Anghelescu, Costantino Benedetti, Craig D. Blinderman, Barry Boston, Charles Cleeland, Nessa Coyle, Oscar A. deLeon-Casasola, June G. Eilers, Betty Ferrell, Nora A. Janjan, Sloan Beth Karver, Michael H. Levy, Maureen Lynch, Natalie Moryl, Barbara A. Murphy, Suzanne A. Nesbit, Linda Oakes, Eugenie A. Obbens, Judith A. Paice, Michael W. Rabow, Karen L. Syrjala, Susan Urba and Sharon M. Weinstein

Overview Pain, defined as “a sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage or described in terms of such damage,”1 is one of the most common symptoms associated with cancer. Cancer pain or cancer-related pain is distinct from pain experienced by patients without malignancies. Pain occurs in approximately one quarter of patients with newly diagnosed malignancies, one third of patients undergoing treatment, and three quarters of patients with advanced disease,2–4 and is one of the symptoms patients fear most. Unrelieved pain denies patients comfort and greatly affects their activities, motivation, interactions with family and friends, and overall quality of life. The importance of relieving pain and availability of effective therapies make it imperative that physicians and nurses caring for these patients be adept at the assessment and treatment of cancer pain.5–7 This requires familiarity with the pathogenesis of cancer pain; pain assessment techniques; common barriers to the delivery of appropriate analgesia; and pertinent pharmacologic, anesthetic, neurosurgical, and behavioral approaches to the treatment of cancer pain. The most widely accepted algorithm for the treatment of cancer pain was developed by the WHO.8,9 It suggests that patients with pain be started on acetaminophen or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). If this is not sufficient, patients should be escalated to a weak opioid, such as codeine, and then to a strong opioid, such as morphine. Although this algorithm has served as an excellent teaching tool, the management of cancer pain is considerably more complex than this 3-tiered “cancer pain ladder”...
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Robert J. Morgan Jr., Ronald D. Alvarez, Deborah K. Armstrong, Barry Boston, Robert A. Burger, Lee-may Chen, Larry Copeland, Marta Ann Crispens, David Gershenson, Heidi J. Gray, Perry W. Grigsby, Ardeshir Hakam, Laura J. Havrilesky, Carolyn Johnston, Shashikant Lele, Ursula A. Matulonis, David M. O'Malley, Richard T. Penson, Steven W. Remmenga, Paul Sabbatini, Russell J. Schilder, Julian C. Schink, Nelson Teng and Theresa L. Werner

Ovarian neoplasms consist of several histopathologic entities, and treatment depends on the specific tumor type. Epithelial ovarian cancer comprises most malignant ovarian neoplasms (∼ 80%)1; however, other less-common pathologic subtypes must be considered in treatment guidelines. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Ovarian Cancer discuss epithelial ovarian cancer (including borderline or low malignant potential) and less-common histopathologies, including malignant germ cell neoplasms, carcinosarcomas (malignant mixed Müllerian tumors of the ovary [MMMT]), and sex cord-stromal tumors. The guidelines also discuss fallopian tube and primary peritoneal cancers, which are less-common neoplasms that are managed similarly to epithelial ovarian cancer. However, the less-common histologies of ovarian cancer are managed differently. Information on the less-common ovarian histopathologies are not published in this issue of JNCCN, but can be found online at www.NCCN.org. Epithelial ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecologic cancer in the United States and the country's fifth most common cause of cancer mortality in women. In 2010, an estimated 21,900 new diagnoses and 13,900 deaths will occur from this neoplasm in the United States; fewer than 40% of women with ovarian cancer are cured.2,3 The incidence of ovarian cancer increases with age and is most prevalent in the eighth decade of life, with a rate of 57 per 100,000 women. The median age at diagnosis is 63 years, and 70% of patients present with advanced disease.4 Epidemiologic studies have identified risk factors for ovarian cancer. A 30% to 60% decreased risk of cancer is associated...
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James Mohler, Robert R. Bahnson, Barry Boston, J. Erik Busby, Anthony D'Amico, James A. Eastham, Charles A. Enke, Daniel George, Eric Mark Horwitz, Robert P. Huben, Philip Kantoff, Mark Kawachi, Michael Kuettel, Paul H. Lange, Gary MacVicar, Elizabeth R. Plimack, Julio M. Pow-Sang, Mack Roach III, Eric Rohren, Bruce J. Roth, Dennis C. Shrieve, Matthew R. Smith, Sandy Srinivas, Przemyslaw Twardowski and Patrick C. Walsh

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the number of newly diagnosed prostate cancers in the United States increased dramatically, surpassing lung cancer as the most common cancer in men. 1 Experts generally believe that these changes resulted from prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening that detected many early-stage prostate cancers. For example, the percentage of patients with low-risk disease has increased (45.3% in 1999–2001 vs. 29.8% in 1989–1992; P < .0001). 2 The incidence of prostate cancer increased 2.0% annually from 1995 to 2001 and has since declined. In 2009, an estimated 192,280 new cases were diagnosed and prostate cancer was expected to account for 25% of new cancer cases in men. 1 Fortunately, the age-adjusted death rates from prostate cancer have also declined (–4.1% annually from 1994 to 2001). 1 Researchers expect prostate cancer to account for 27,360 deaths in 2009. 1 This comparatively low death rate suggests that, unless prostate cancer is becoming biologically less aggressive, increased public awareness with earlier detection and treatment of prostate cancer has begun to affect mortality from this prevalent cancer. However, early detection and treatment of prostate cancers that do not threaten life expectancy cause unnecessary side effects that impair quality of life, increase health care expenses, and decrease the value of PSA and digital rectal examination (DRE) as early detection tests. 3,4 To properly identify and manage patients with prostate cancer or any other malignancy, physicians must have an in-depth understanding of the natural history and diagnostic, staging, and treatment options. To this end, every year the NCCN...
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James L. Mohler, Andrew J. Armstrong, Robert R. Bahnson, Barry Boston, J. Erik Busby, Anthony Victor D’Amico, James A. Eastham, Charles A. Enke, Thomas Farrington, Celestia S. Higano, Eric Mark Horwitz, Philip W. Kantoff, Mark H. Kawachi, Michael Kuettel, Richard J. Lee, Gary R. MacVicar, Arnold W. Malcolm, David Miller, Elizabeth R. Plimack, Julio M. Pow-Sang, Mack Roach III, Eric Rohren, Stan Rosenfeld, Sandy Srinivas, Seth A. Strope, Jonathan Tward, Przemyslaw Twardowski, Patrick C. Walsh, Maria Ho and Dorothy A. Shead

The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Prostate Cancer provide multidisciplinary recommendations for the clinical management of patients with prostate cancer. These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight notable recent updates. Abiraterone acetate is a first-in-class hormonal agent that represents a new standard of care for patients with metastatic castration-recurrent prostate cancer who have previously received docetaxel (category 1 recommendation). Abiraterone acetate also received category 2B recommendations in the prechemotherapy setting for asymptomatic patients or symptomatic patients who are not candidates for docetaxel. The NCCN Prostate Cancer Panel also added new indications for existing agents, including the option of sipuleucel-T as second-line therapy. In addition, brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiation therapy with or without androgen deprivation therapy is now an alternative for patients with high-risk localized tumors or locally advanced disease.