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Angel Qin, Songzhu Zhao, Abdul Miah, Lai Wei, Sandipkumar Patel, Andrew Johns, Madison Grogan, Erin M. Bertino, Kai He, Peter G. Shields, Gregory P. Kalemkerian, Shirish M. Gadgeel, Nithya Ramnath, Bryan J. Schneider, Khaled A. Hassan, Nicholas Szerlip, Zoey Chopra, Sara Journey, Jessica Waninger, Daniel Spakowicz, David P. Carbone, Carolyn J. Presley, Gregory A. Otterson, Michael D. Green, and Dwight H. Owen

Background: Bone metastases and skeletal-related events (SREs) are a frequent cause of morbidity in patients with metastatic non–small cell lung cancer (mNSCLC). Data are limited on bone metastases and SREs in patients with mNSCLC treated using immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), and on the efficacy of bone-modifying agents (BMAs) in this setting. Here we report the incidence, impact on survival, risk factors for bone metastases and SREs, and impact of BMAs in patients with mNSCLC treated with ICIs in a multi-institutional cohort. Patients and Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of patients with mNSCLC treated with ICIs at 2 tertiary care centers from 2014 through 2017. Overall survival (OS) was compared between patients with and without baseline bone metastases using a log-rank test. A Cox regression model was used to evaluate the association between OS and the presence of bone metastases at ICI initiation, controlling for other confounding factors. Results: We identified a cohort of 330 patients who had received ICIs for metastatic disease. Median patient age was 63 years, most patients were treated in the second line or beyond (n=259; 78%), and nivolumab was the most common ICI (n=211; 64%). Median OS was 10 months (95% CI, 8.4–12.0). In our cohort, 124 patients (38%) had baseline bone metastases, and 43 (13%) developed SREs during or after ICI treatment. Patients with bone metastases had a higher hazard of death after controlling for performance status, histology, line of therapy, and disease burden (hazard ratio, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.19–2.08; P=.001). Use of BMAs was not associated with OS or a decreased risk of SREs. Conclusions: Presence of bone metastases at baseline was associated with a worse prognosis for patients with mNSCLC treated with ICI after controlling for multiple clinical characteristics. Use of BMAs was not associated with reduced SREs or a difference in survival.

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Apar Kishor P. Ganti, Billy W. Loo Jr., Michael Bassetti, Collin Blakely, Anne Chiang, Thomas A. D'Amico, Christopher D'Avella, Afshin Dowlati, Robert J. Downey, Martin Edelman, Charles Florsheim, Kathryn A. Gold, Jonathan W. Goldman, John C. Grecula, Christine Hann, Wade Iams, Puneeth Iyengar, Karen Kelly, Maya Khalil, Marianna Koczywas, Robert E. Merritt, Nisha Mohindra, Julian Molina, Cesar Moran, Saraswati Pokharel, Sonam Puri, Angel Qin, Chad Rusthoven, Jacob Sands, Rafael Santana-Davila, Michael Shafique, Saiama N. Waqar, Kristina M. Gregory, and Miranda Hughes

The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) provide recommended management for patients with SCLC, including diagnosis, primary treatment, surveillance for relapse, and subsequent treatment. This selection for the journal focuses on metastatic (known as extensive-stage) SCLC, which is more common than limited-stage SCLC. Systemic therapy alone can palliate symptoms and prolong survival in most patients with extensive-stage disease. Smoking cessation counseling and intervention should be strongly promoted in patients with SCLC and other high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas. The “Summary of the Guidelines Updates” section in the SCLC algorithm outlines the most recent revisions for the 2022 update, which are described in greater detail in this revised Discussion text.