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Andrew D. Zelenetz, William G. Wierda, Jeremy S. Abramson, Ranjana H. Advani, C. Babis Andreadis, Nancy Bartlett, Naresh Bellam, John C. Byrd, Myron S. Czuczman, Luis Fayad, Martha J. Glenn, Jon P. Gockerman, Leo I. Gordon, Nancy Lee Harris, Richard T. Hoppe, Steven M. Horwitz, Christopher R. Kelsey, Youn H. Kim, Susan Krivacic, Ann S. LaCasce, Auayporn Nademanee, Pierluigi Porcu, Oliver Press, Barbara Pro, Nishitha Reddy, Lubomir Sokol, Lode Swinnen, Christina Tsien, Julie M. Vose, Joachim Yahalom, Nadeem Zafar, Maoko Naganuma and Mary A. Dwyer

These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize several key updates to the 2012 NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphomas (NHL) and describe the clinical evidence supporting the updates. The featured updates include changes to the recommendations for treatment options in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (including in elderly or frail patients and patients with poor-risk cytogenetics), guidance surrounding surveillance imaging for follow-up of patients with NHL, and the addition of first-line consolidation options for patients with mantle cell lymphoma.

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NCCN Guidelines Insights: Ovarian Cancer, Version 1.2019

Featured Updates to the NCCN Guidelines

Deborah K. Armstrong, Ronald D. Alvarez, Jamie N. Bakkum-Gamez, Lisa Barroilhet, Kian Behbakht, Andrew Berchuck, Jonathan S. Berek, Lee-may Chen, Mihaela Cristea, Marie DeRosa, Adam C. ElNaggar, David M. Gershenson, Heidi J. Gray, Ardeshir Hakam, Angela Jain, Carolyn Johnston, Charles A. Leath III, Joyce Liu, Haider Mahdi, Daniela Matei, Michael McHale, Karen McLean, David M. O’Malley, Richard T. Penson, Sanja Percac-Lima, Elena Ratner, Steven W. Remmenga, Paul Sabbatini, Theresa L. Werner, Emese Zsiros, Jennifer L. Burns and Anita M. Engh

Epithelial ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecologic cancer in the United States, with less than half of patients living >5 years from diagnosis. A major challenge in treating ovarian cancer is that most patients have advanced disease at initial diagnosis. The best outcomes are observed in patients whose primary treatment includes complete resection of all visible disease plus combination platinum-based chemotherapy. Research efforts are focused on primary neoadjuvant treatments that may improve resectability, as well as systemic therapies providing improved long-term survival. These NCCN Guidelines Insights focus on recent updates to neoadjuvant chemotherapy recommendations, including the addition of hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy, and the role of PARP inhibitors and bevacizumab as maintenance therapy options in select patients who have completed primary chemotherapy.

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Erin Reid, Gita Suneja, Richard F. Ambinder, Kevin Ard, Robert Baiocchi, Stefan K. Barta, Evie Carchman, Adam Cohen, Oxana V. Crysler, Neel Gupta, Chelsea Gustafson, Allison Hall, Kimberly L. Johung, Ann Klopp, Ann S. LaCasce, Chi Lin, Amitkumar Mehta, Manoj P. Menon, David Morgan, Nitya Nathwani, Ariela Noy, Lee Ratner, Stacey Rizza, Michelle A. Rudek, Julian Sanchez, Jeff Taylor, Benjamin Tomlinson, Chia-Ching J. Wang, Sai Yendamuri, Mary A. Dwyer, CGC and Deborah A. Freedman-Cass

As treatment of HIV has improved, people living with HIV (PLWH) have experienced a decreased risk of AIDS and AIDS-defining cancers (non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, Kaposi sarcoma, and cervical cancer), but the risk of Kaposi sarcoma in PLWH is still elevated about 500-fold compared with the general population in the United States. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for AIDS-Related Kaposi Sarcoma provide diagnosis, treatment, and surveillance recommendations for PLWH who develop limited cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma and for those with advanced cutaneous, oral, visceral, or nodal disease.

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Andrew D. Zelenetz, William G. Wierda, Jeremy S. Abramson, Ranjana H. Advani, C. Babis Andreadis, Nancy Bartlett, Naresh Bellam, John C. Byrd, Myron S. Czuczman, Luis E. Fayad, Martha J. Glenn, Jon P. Gockerman, Leo I. Gordon, Nancy Lee Harris, Richard T. Hoppe, Steven M. Horwitz, Christopher R. Kelsey, Youn H. Kim, Susan Krivacic, Ann S. LaCasce, Auayporn Nademanee, Pierluigi Porcu, Oliver Press, Barbara Pro, Nishitha Reddy, Lubomir Sokol, Lode Swinnen, Christina Tsien, Julie M. Vose, Joachim Yahalom, Nadeem Zafar, Mary A. Dwyer and Maoko Naganuma

These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize several key updates to the NCCN Guidelines for Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphomas (NHL) and provide a discussion of the clinical evidence that support the updates. The updates discussed in this article feature recommendations for additional treatment options in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and guidance surrounding the management of hepatitis virus reactivation/infections in high-risk patients with NHL undergoing antitumor therapy.

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Andrew D. Zelenetz, Jeremy S. Abramson, Ranjana H. Advani, C. Babis Andreadis, John C. Byrd, Myron S. Czuczman, Luis Fayad, Andres Forero, Martha J. Glenn, Jon P. Gockerman, Leo I. Gordon, Nancy Lee Harris, Richard T. Hoppe, Steven M. Horwitz, Mark S. Kaminski, Youn H. Kim, Ann S. LaCasce, Tariq I. Mughal, Auyporn Nademanee, Pierluigi Porcu, Oliver Press, Leonard Prosnitz, Nashitha Reddy, Mitchell R. Smith, Lubomir Sokol, Lode Swinnen, Julie M. Vose, William G. Wierda, Joachim Yahalom and Furhan Yunus

OverviewNon-Hodgkin’s lymphomas (NHLs) are a heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative disorders originating in B-, T-, or natural killer (NK) lymphocytes. In the United States, B-cell lymphomas represent 80% to 85% of all cases, with 15% to 20% being T-cell lymphomas; NK lymphomas are very rare. In 2009, an estimated 65,980 new cases of NHL will be diagnosed and 19,500 will die of the disease.1 NHL is the sixth leading site of new cancer cases among men and fifth among women, accounting for 4% to 5% of new cancer cases and 3% to 4% of cancer-related deaths.1The incidence of NHL increased dramatically between 1970 and 1995; the increase has moderated since the mid-1990s. This increase has been attributed partly to the HIV epidemic and the development of AIDS-related NHL. However, much of the increased incidence has been observed in patients in their sixth and seventh decades, and has largely paralleled a major decrease in mortality from other causes. Because the median age of individuals with NHL has risen in the past 2 decades,2 patients with NHL may also have significant comorbid conditions, which can complicate treatment options.NOTE: This manuscript highlights only a portion of the NCCN Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Guidelines. Please refer to www.NCCN.org for the complete guidelines.ClassificationIn the 1956, Rappaport et al.3 proposed a lymphoma classification based on the pattern of cell growth (nodular or diffuse), and size and shape of the tumor cells.4 This classification, although widely used in the United States, quickly became outdated with...
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David S. Ettinger, Douglas E. Wood, Wallace Akerley, Lyudmila A. Bazhenova, Hossein Borghaei, David Ross Camidge, Richard T. Cheney, Lucian R. Chirieac, Thomas A. D’Amico, Todd L. Demmy, Thomas J. Dilling, M. Chris Dobelbower, Ramaswamy Govindan, Frederic W. Grannis Jr, Leora Horn, Thierry M. Jahan, Ritsuko Komaki, Lee M. Krug, Rudy P. Lackner, Michael Lanuti, Rogerio Lilenbaum, Jules Lin, Billy W. Loo Jr, Renato Martins, Gregory A. Otterson, Jyoti D. Patel, Katherine M. Pisters, Karen Reckamp, Gregory J. Riely, Eric Rohren, Steven E. Schild, Theresa A. Shapiro, Scott J. Swanson, Kurt Tauer, Stephen C. Yang, Kristina Gregory and Miranda Hughes

These NCCN Guidelines Insights focus on recent updates to the 2015 NCCN Guidelines for Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC). Appropriate targeted therapy is very effective in patients with advanced NSCLC who have specific genetic alterations. Therefore, it is important to test tumor tissue from patients with advanced NSCLC to determine whether they have genetic alterations that make them candidates for specific targeted therapies. These NCCN Guidelines Insights describe the different testing methods currently available for determining whether patients have genetic alterations in the 2 most commonly actionable genetic alterations, notably anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements and sensitizing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations.

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David S. Ettinger, Wallace Akerley, Hossein Borghaei, Andrew C. Chang, Richard T. Cheney, Lucian R. Chirieac, Thomas A. D'Amico, Todd L. Demmy, Ramaswamy Govindan, Frederic W. Grannis Jr, Stefan C. Grant, Leora Horn, Thierry M. Jahan, Ritsuko Komaki, Feng-Ming (Spring) Kong, Mark G. Kris, Lee M. Krug, Rudy P. Lackner, Inga T. Lennes, Billy W. Loo Jr, Renato Martins, Gregory A. Otterson, Jyoti D. Patel, Mary C. Pinder-Schenck, Katherine M. Pisters, Karen Reckamp, Gregory J. Riely, Eric Rohren, Theresa A. Shapiro, Scott J. Swanson, Kurt Tauer, Douglas E. Wood, Stephen C. Yang, Kristina Gregory and Miranda Hughes

These NCCN Guidelines Insights focus on the diagnostic evaluation of suspected lung cancer. This topic was the subject of a major update in the 2013 NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer. The NCCN Guidelines Insights focus on the major updates in the NCCN Guidelines and discuss the new updates in greater detail.