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Andrew D. Zelenetz, Leo I. Gordon, William G. Wierda, Jeremy S. Abramson, Ranjana H. Advani, C. Babis Andreadis, Nancy Bartlett, John C. Byrd, Myron S. Czuczman, Luis E. Fayad, Richard I. Fisher, Martha J. Glenn, Nancy Lee Harris, Richard T. Hoppe, Steven M. Horwitz, Christopher R. Kelsey, Youn H. Kim, Susan Krivacic, Ann S. LaCasce, Auayporn Nademanee, Pierluigi Porcu, Oliver Press, Rachel Rabinovitch, Nishitha Reddy, Erin Reid, Ayman A. Saad, Lubomir Sokol, Lode J. Swinnen, Christina Tsien, Julie M. Vose, Joachim Yahalom, Nadeem Zafar, Mary Dwyer and Hema Sundar

Non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas (NHL) are a heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative disorders originating in B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, or natural killer cells. Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) accounts for approximately 6% of all newly diagnosed NHL cases. Radiation therapy with or without systemic therapy is a reasonable approach for the few patients who present with early-stage disease. Rituximab-based chemoimmunotherapy followed by high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell rescue (HDT/ASCR) is recommended for patients presenting with advanced-stage disease. Induction therapy followed by rituximab maintenance may provide extended disease control for those who are not candidates for HDT/ASCR. Ibrutinib, a Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was recently approved for the treatment of relapsed or refractory disease. This manuscript discusses the recommendations outlined in the NCCN Guidelines for NHL regarding the diagnosis and management of patients with MCL.

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Andrew D. Zelenetz, Jeremy S. Abramson, Ranjana H. Advani, C. Babis Andreadis, John C. Byrd, Myron S. Czuczman, Luis Fayad, Andres Forero, Martha J. Glenn, Jon P. Gockerman, Leo I. Gordon, Nancy Lee Harris, Richard T. Hoppe, Steven M. Horwitz, Mark S. Kaminski, Youn H. Kim, Ann S. LaCasce, Tariq I. Mughal, Auyporn Nademanee, Pierluigi Porcu, Oliver Press, Leonard Prosnitz, Nashitha Reddy, Mitchell R. Smith, Lubomir Sokol, Lode Swinnen, Julie M. Vose, William G. Wierda, Joachim Yahalom and Furhan Yunus

Overview Non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas (NHLs) are a heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative disorders originating in B-, T-, or natural killer (NK) lymphocytes. In the United States, B-cell lymphomas represent 80% to 85% of all cases, with 15% to 20% being T-cell lymphomas; NK lymphomas are very rare. In 2009, an estimated 65,980 new cases of NHL will be diagnosed and 19,500 will die of the disease.1 NHL is the sixth leading site of new cancer cases among men and fifth among women, accounting for 4% to 5% of new cancer cases and 3% to 4% of cancer-related deaths.1 The incidence of NHL increased dramatically between 1970 and 1995; the increase has moderated since the mid-1990s. This increase has been attributed partly to the HIV epidemic and the development of AIDS-related NHL. However, much of the increased incidence has been observed in patients in their sixth and seventh decades, and has largely paralleled a major decrease in mortality from other causes. Because the median age of individuals with NHL has risen in the past 2 decades,2 patients with NHL may also have significant comorbid conditions, which can complicate treatment options. NOTE: This manuscript highlights only a portion of the NCCN Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Guidelines. Please refer to www.NCCN.org for the complete guidelines. Classification In the 1956, Rappaport et al.3 proposed a lymphoma classification based on the pattern of cell growth (nodular or diffuse), and size and shape of the tumor cells.4 This classification, although widely used in the United States, quickly became outdated with...
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William G. Wierda, John C. Byrd, Jeremy S. Abramson, Syed F. Bilgrami, Greg Bociek, Danielle Brander, Jennifer Brown, Asher A. Chanan-Khan, Julio C. Chavez, Steve E. Coutre, Randall S. Davis, Christopher D. Fletcher, Brian Hill, Brad S. Kahl, Manali Kamdar, Lawrence D. Kaplan, Nadia Khan, Thomas J. Kipps, Shuo Ma, Sami Malek, Anthony Mato, Claudio Mosse, Vishala T. Neppalli, Mazyar Shadman, Tanya Siddiqi, Deborah Stephens, Nina Wagner, Mary A. Dwyer and Hema Sundar

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is generally characterized by an indolent disease course. Histologic transformation (also known as Richter's transformation) to more aggressive lymphomas, such as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or Hodgkin lymphoma, occurs in approximately 2% to 10% of patients and is associated with a poor prognosis. These NCCN Guidelines Insights discuss the recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with histologic transformation.

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Robert I. Haddad, Christian Nasr, Lindsay Bischoff, Naifa Lamki Busaidy, David Byrd, Glenda Callender, Paxton Dickson, Quan-Yang Duh, Hormoz Ehya, Whitney Goldner, Megan Haymart, Carl Hoh, Jason P. Hunt, Andrei Iagaru, Fouad Kandeel, Peter Kopp, Dominick M. Lamonica, Bryan McIver, Christopher D. Raeburn, John A. Ridge, Matthew D. Ringel, Randall P. Scheri, Jatin P. Shah, Rebecca Sippel, Robert C. Smallridge, Cord Sturgeon, Thomas N. Wang, Lori J. Wirth, Richard J. Wong, Alyse Johnson-Chilla, Karin G. Hoffmann and Lisa A. Gurski

The NCCN Guidelines for Thyroid Carcinoma provide recommendations for the management of different types of thyroid carcinoma, including papillary, follicular, Hürthle cell, medullary, and anaplastic carcinomas. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the panel discussion behind recent updates to the guidelines, including the expanding role of molecular testing for differentiated thyroid carcinoma, implications of the new pathologic diagnosis of noninvasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary-like nuclear features, and the addition of a new targeted therapy option for BRAF V600E–mutated anaplastic thyroid carcinoma.

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Steven M. Horwitz, Andrew D. Zelenetz, Leo I. Gordon, William G. Wierda, Jeremy S. Abramson, Ranjana H. Advani, C. Babis Andreadis, Nancy Bartlett, John C. Byrd, Luis E. Fayad, Richard I. Fisher, Martha J. Glenn, Thomas M. Habermann, Nancy Lee Harris, Francisco Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Richard T. Hoppe, Mark S. Kaminski, Christopher R. Kelsey, Youn H. Kim, Susan Krivacic, Ann S. LaCasce, Matthew Lunning, Auayporn Nademanee, Oliver Press, Rachel Rabinovitch, Nishitha Reddy, Erin Reid, Kenneth Roberts, Ayman A. Saad, Lubomir Sokol, Lode J. Swinnen, Julie M. Vose, Joachim Yahalom, Nadeem Zafar, Mary Dwyer, Hema Sundar and Pierluigi Porcu

Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) represent a relatively uncommon heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs) with an aggressive clinical course and poor prognosis. Anthracycline-based multiagent chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy followed by first-line consolidation with high-dose therapy followed by autologous stem cell rescue (HDT/ASCR) is the standard approach to most of the patients with newly diagnosed PTCL. Relapsed or refractory disease is managed with second-line systemic therapy followed by HDT/ASCR or allogeneic stem cell transplant, based on the patient's eligibility for transplant. In recent years, several newer agents have shown significant activity in patients with relapsed or refractory disease across all 4 subtypes of PTCL. These NCCN Guideline Insights highlight the important updates to the NCCN Guidelines for NHL, specific to the management of patients with relapsed or refractory PTCL.

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William G. Wierda, Andrew D. Zelenetz, Leo I. Gordon, Jeremy S. Abramson, Ranjana H. Advani, C. Babis Andreadis, Nancy Bartlett, John C. Byrd, Paolo Caimi, Luis E. Fayad, Richard I. Fisher, Martha J. Glenn, Thomas M. Habermann, Nancy Lee Harris, Francisco Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Richard T. Hoppe, Steven M. Horwitz, Mark S. Kaminski, Christopher R. Kelsey, Youn H. Kim, Susan Krivacic, Ann S. LaCasce, Michael G. Martin, Auayporn Nademanee, Pierluigi Porcu, Oliver Press, Rachel Rabinovitch, Nishitha Reddy, Erin Reid, Kenneth Roberts, Ayman A. Saad, Erin D. Snyder, Lubomir Sokol, Lode J. Swinnen, Julie M. Vose, Joachim Yahalom, Mary A. Dwyer and Hema Sundar

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) are different manifestations of the same disease and managed in much the same way. The advent of novel CD20 monoclonal antibodies led to the development of effective chemoimmunotherapy regimens. More recently, small molecule inhibitors targeting kinases involved in a number of critical signaling pathways and a small molecule inhibitor of the BCL-2 family of proteins have demonstrated activity for the treatment of patients with CLL/SLL. These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight important updates to the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for CLL/SLL for the treatment of patients with newly diagnosed or relapsed/refractory CLL/SLL.