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Jaffer A. Ajani, James S. Barthel, Tanios Bekaii-Saab, David J. Bentrem, Thomas A. D'Amico, Prajnan Das, Crystal Denlinger, Charles S. Fuchs, Hans Gerdes, James A. Hayman, Lisa Hazard, Wayne L. Hofstetter, David H. Ilson, Rajesh N. Keswani, Lawrence R. Kleinberg, Michael Korn, Kenneth Meredith, Mary F. Mulcahy, Mark B. Orringer, Raymond U. Osarogiagbon, James A. Posey, Aaron R. Sasson, Walter J. Scott, Stephen Shibata, Vivian E. M. Strong, Mary Kay Washington, Christopher Willett, Douglas E. Wood, Cameron D. Wright and Gary Yang

Overview Cancers originating in the esophagus, gastroesophageal junctions, and stomach constitute a major health problem worldwide. In the United States, 37,600 new diagnoses of and 25,150 deaths from upper gastrointestinal cancers were estimated in 2009. 1 A dramatic shift in the location of upper gastrointestinal tumors has occurred in the United States, 2 and changes in histology and location of them were observed in some parts of Europe. 3,4 In countries in the Western Hemisphere, the most common sites of gastric cancer are the proximal lesser curvature, cardia, and gastroesophageal junction. 2 These changing trends may also begin to occur in South America and Asia. Epidemiology Gastric cancer is rampant in many countries around the world. In Japan, it remains the most common type of cancer among men; in China, more new cases are diagnosed each year than in any other country. The incidence of gastric cancer, however, has been declining globally since World War II and it is one of the least common cancers in North America. By some estimates, it is the fourth most common cancer worldwide. 5 In 2009, 21,130 new diagnoses of gastric cancer were estimated in the United States and 10,620 deaths expected. 1 In developed countries, the incidence of gastric cancer originating from the cardia follows the distribution of esophageal cancer. 6–8 Noncardia gastric adenocarcinoma has marked geographic variation, with countries such as Japan, Korea, China, Taiwan, Costa Rica, Peru, Brazil, Chile, and the former Soviet Union showing a high incidence. 9 In contrast to the incidence trends in the West, nonproximal...
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Al B. Benson III, Tanios Bekaii-Saab, Emily Chan, Yi-Jen Chen, Michael A. Choti, Harry S. Cooper, Paul F. Engstrom, Peter C. Enzinger, Marwan G. Fakih, Moon J. Fenton, Charles S. Fuchs, Jean L. Grem, Steven Hunt, Ahmed Kamel, Lucille A. Leong, Edward Lin, Kilian Salerno May, Mary F. Mulcahy, Kate Murphy, Eric Rohren, David P. Ryan, Leonard Saltz, Sunil Sharma, David Shibata, John M. Skibber, William Small Jr, Constantinos T. Sofocleous, Alan P. Venook, Christopher G. Willett, Kristina M. Gregory and Deborah A. Freedman-Cass

The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Colon Cancer begin with the clinical presentation of the patient to the primary care physician or gastroenterologist and address diagnosis, pathologic staging, surgical management, perioperative treatment, patient surveillance, management of recurrent and metastatic disease, and survivorship. The NCCN Colon Cancer Panel meets annually to review comments from reviewers within their institutions and to reevaluate and update their recommendations. In addition, the panel has interim conferences as new data necessitate. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the NCCN Colon Cancer Panel’s discussions regarding the treatment of localized disease for the 2013 update of the guidelines.

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Jaffer A. Ajani, Thomas A. D’Amico, Khaldoun Almhanna, David J. Bentrem, Stephen Besh, Joseph Chao, Prajnan Das, Crystal Denlinger, Paul Fanta, Charles S. Fuchs, Hans Gerdes, Robert E. Glasgow, James A. Hayman, Steven Hochwald, Wayne L. Hofstetter, David H. Ilson, Dawn Jaroszewski, Kory Jasperson, Rajesh N. Keswani, Lawrence R. Kleinberg, W. Michael Korn, Stephen Leong, A. Craig Lockhart, Mary F. Mulcahy, Mark B. Orringer, James A. Posey, George A. Poultsides, Aaron R. Sasson, Walter J. Scott, Vivian E. Strong, Thomas K. Varghese Jr, Mary Kay Washington, Christopher G. Willett, Cameron D. Wright, Debra Zelman, Nicole McMillian and Hema Sundar

Esophageal cancer is the sixth most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Adenocarcinoma is more common in North America and Western European countries, originating mostly in the lower third of the esophagus, which often involves the esophagogastric junction (EGJ). Recent randomized trials have shown that the addition of preoperative chemoradiation or perioperative chemotherapy to surgery significantly improves survival in patients with resectable cancer. Targeted therapies with trastuzumab and ramucirumab have produced encouraging results in the treatment of advanced or metastatic EGJ adenocarcinomas. Multidisciplinary team management is essential for patients with esophageal and EGJ cancers. This portion of the NCCN Guidelines for Esophageal and EGJ Cancers discusses management of locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and EGJ.

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Jaffer A. Ajani, David J. Bentrem, Stephen Besh, Thomas A. D’Amico, Prajnan Das, Crystal Denlinger, Marwan G. Fakih, Charles S. Fuchs, Hans Gerdes, Robert E. Glasgow, James A. Hayman, Wayne L. Hofstetter, David H. Ilson, Rajesh N. Keswani, Lawrence R. Kleinberg, W. Michael Korn, A. Craig Lockhart, Kenneth Meredith, Mary F. Mulcahy, Mark B. Orringer, James A. Posey, Aaron R. Sasson, Walter J. Scott, Vivian E. Strong, Thomas K. Varghese Jr, Graham Warren, Mary Kay Washington, Christopher Willett, Cameron D. Wright, Nicole R. McMillian and Hema Sundar

The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Gastric Cancer provide evidence- and consensus-based recommendations for a multidisciplinary approach for the management of patients with gastric cancer. For patients with resectable locoregional cancer, the guidelines recommend gastrectomy with a D1+ or a modified D2 lymph node dissection (performed by experienced surgeons in high-volume centers). Postoperative chemoradiation is the preferred option after complete gastric resection for patients with T3-T4 tumors and node-positive T1-T2 tumors. Postoperative chemotherapy is included as an option after a modified D2 lymph node dissection for this group of patients. Trastuzumab with chemotherapy is recommended as first-line therapy for patients with HER2-positive advanced or metastatic cancer, confirmed by immunohistochemistry and, if needed, by fluorescence in situ hybridization for IHC 2+.

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Al B. Benson III, Alan P. Venook, Tanios Bekaii-Saab, Emily Chan, Yi-Jen Chen, Harry S. Cooper, Paul F. Engstrom, Peter C. Enzinger, Moon J. Fenton, Charles S. Fuchs, Jean L. Grem, Axel Grothey, Howard S. Hochster, Steven Hunt, Ahmed Kamel, Natalie Kirilcuk, Lucille A. Leong, Edward Lin, Wells A. Messersmith, Mary F. Mulcahy, James D. Murphy, Steven Nurkin, Eric Rohren, David P. Ryan, Leonard Saltz, Sunil Sharma, David Shibata, John M. Skibber, Constantinos T. Sofocleous, Elena M. Stoffel, Eden Stotsky-Himelfarb, Christopher G. Willett, Kristina M. Gregory and Deborah Freedman-Cass

The NCCN Guidelines for Rectal Cancer begin with the clinical presentation of the patient to the primary care physician or gastroenterologist and address diagnosis, pathologic staging, surgical management, perioperative treatment, posttreatment surveillance, management of recurrent and metastatic disease, and survivorship. The NCCN Rectal Cancer Panel meets at least annually to review comments from reviewers within their institutions, examine relevant new data from publications and abstracts, and reevaluate and update their recommendations. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize major discussion points from the 2015 NCCN Rectal Cancer Panel meeting. Major discussion topics this year were perioperative therapy options and surveillance for patients with stage I through III disease.