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Al B. Benson III, Michael I. D'Angelica, Daniel E. Abbott, Thomas A. Abrams, Steven R. Alberts, Daniel A. Anaya, Chandrakanth Are, Daniel B. Brown, Daniel T. Chang, Anne M. Covey, William Hawkins, Renuka Iyer, Rojymon Jacob, Andrea Karachristos, R. Kate Kelley, Robin Kim, Manisha Palta, James O. Park, Vaibhav Sahai, Tracey Schefter, Carl Schmidt, Jason K. Sicklick, Gagandeep Singh, Davendra Sohal, Stacey Stein, G. Gary Tian, Jean-Nicolas Vauthey, Alan P. Venook, Andrew X. Zhu, Karin G. Hoffmann, and Susan Darlow

those caused by hepatitis B virus and/or hepatitis C virus, and cirrhosis from any cause (eg, alcohol cirrhosis). 2 Some nonviral causes include inherited errors of metabolism (relatively rare), such as hereditary hemochromatosis, porphyria cutanea

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Paul F. Engstrom

. Others become less engaged with their patients and the profession and suffer a decline in the quality of their work. Some physicians turn to unhealthy and even self-destructive habits such as excessive alcohol intake or inappropriate use of prescription

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Xiuning Le, Renata Ferrarotto, Trisha Wise-Draper, and Maura Gillison

. However, squamous cell carcinoma is the most common pathologic type. 2 Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) can be largely divided into 2 groups: those associated with carcinogens (eg, tobacco and alcohol) or with HPV infection. 3 Most

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Judith A. Paice

should delve deeper into potential risk factors for the abuse of pain medications, according to Dr. Paice. Current or past habits with regard to alcohol and tobacco use should be explored. Environmental and genetic exposure to substance abuse disorder in

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health efforts in preventing liver cancer. He cited the hepatitis B vaccine as one key cancer prevention tool, as well as more broad-based education around the long-term effects of heavy alcohol consumption. The content in the NCCN Patient uidelines is

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Crystal S. Denlinger, Robert W. Carlson, Madhuri Are, K. Scott Baker, Elizabeth Davis, Stephen B. Edge, Debra L. Friedman, Mindy Goldman, Lee Jones, Allison King, Elizabeth Kvale, Terry S. Langbaum, Jennifer A. Ligibel, Mary S. McCabe, Kevin T. McVary, Michelle Melisko, Jose G. Montoya, Kathi Mooney, Mary Ann Morgan, Tracey O’Connor, Electra D. Paskett, Muhammad Raza, Karen L. Syrjala, Susan G. Urba, Mark T. Wakabayashi, Phyllis Zee, Nicole McMillian, and Deborah Freedman-Cass

, including screening for possible symptoms and psychosocial problems (ie, anxiety, depression, relationship issues, drug or alcohol use) that can contribute to sexual dysfunction. It is also important to identify prescription and over-the-counter medications

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Shiva Kumar R. Mukkamalla, Hussain M. Naseri, Byung M. Kim, Steven C. Katz, and Vincent A. Armenio

and the increased incidence of hepatitis C virus infection. 4 The etiology and pathogenesis of CCA remain poorly understood. Although most CCAs can arise de novo, risk factors include primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), alcohol consumption, liver

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Crystal S. Denlinger, Jennifer A. Ligibel, Madhuri Are, K. Scott Baker, Wendy Demark-Wahnefried, Don Dizon, Debra L. Friedman, Mindy Goldman, Lee Jones, Allison King, Grace H. Ku, Elizabeth Kvale, Terry S. Langbaum, Kristin Leonardi-Warren, Mary S. McCabe, Michelle Melisko, Jose G. Montoya, Kathi Mooney, Mary Ann Morgan, Javid J. Moslehi, Tracey O’Connor, Linda Overholser, Electra D. Paskett, Jeffrey Peppercorn, Muhammad Raza, M. Alma Rodriguez, Karen L. Syrjala, Susan G. Urba, Mark T. Wakabayashi, Phyllis Zee, Nicole R. McMillian, and Deborah A. Freedman-Cass

, and dietary habits. Survivors should be advised to limit alcohol intake and avoid tobacco products, with emphasis on tobacco cessation if the survivor is a current smoker or user of smokeless tobacco. Clinicians should also advise survivors to practice

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Crystal S. Denlinger, Jennifer A. Ligibel, Madhuri Are, K. Scott Baker, Wendy Demark-Wahnefried, Debra L. Friedman, Mindy Goldman, Lee Jones, Allison King, Grace H. Ku, Elizabeth Kvale, Terry S. Langbaum, Kristin Leonardi-Warren, Mary S. McCabe, Michelle Melisko, Jose G. Montoya, Kathi Mooney, Mary Ann Morgan, Javid J. Moslehi, Tracey O’Connor, Linda Overholser, Electra D. Paskett, Muhammad Raza, Karen L. Syrjala, Susan G. Urba, Mark T. Wakabayashi, Phyllis Zee, Nicole McMillian, and Deborah Freedman-Cass

recommends that treatable contributing factors be assessed and managed. Comorbidities that can contribute to sleep problems include alcohol and substance abuse, obesity, cardiac dysfunction, endocrine dysfunction, anemia, neurologic disorders, pain, fatigue

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Yuan-Yuan Lei, Suzanne C. Ho, Ashley Cheng, Carol Kwok, Chi-Kiu Iris Lee, Ka Li Cheung, Roselle Lee, Herbert H.F. Loong, Yi-Qian He, and Winnie Yeo

gain, 14 , 28 (4) plant-derived foods, (5) animal-source foods, and (6) alcohol. 14 The recommendation on preservation, processing, and preparation of foods was not included because of insufficient data. The recommendation to meet nutritional needs