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Michael A. Cilento, Nicola K. Poplawski, Sellvakumaram Paramasivam, David M. Thomas, and Ganessan Kichenadasse

only for the benefit of patients for whom the result may directly inform their cancer management but also for their families in whom appropriate institution of timely genetic counseling has the potential to saves lives. References 1

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Ammar Sukari, Misako Nagasaka, and Erin Wakeling

genetics clinic for further counseling and testing for hereditary lung cancer syndrome. Her 3 children were also referred for genetic counseling. Discussion Historically, Histology Mattered Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide. In

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Tilmann Bochtler, Volker Endris, Anna Reiling, Jonas Leichsenring, Michal R. Schweiger, Sebastian Klein, Fabian Stögbauer, Benjamin Goeppert, Peter Schirmacher, Alwin Krämer, and Albrecht Stenzinger

additional private WT1 mutation (p.Asp410Glu) at an allele frequency of 18.2%. This mutation is a presumably deleterious mutation, which was undetectable in the lymph node and mesothelioma specimens. The patient subsequently received genetic counseling by

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Megan Randall, Kelly Burgess, Lela Buckingham, and Lydia Usha

cancer and germline BRCA mutations are more likely to benefit from platinum-based chemotherapy and PARP inhibitors. 1 , 4 All women diagnosed with OC should be referred for genetic counseling and testing, regardless of family history and age at

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Michael L. Durando, Sanjay V. Menghani, Jessica L. Baumann, Danny G. Robles, Tovah A. Day, Cyrus Vaziri, and Aaron J. Scott

13D; PIK3CA C278W; a BRCA1 variant of unknown significance (VUS), R1443Q; and BRCA2 VUS K2191N. After this result, our patient was referred for genetic counseling and germline testing. Analysis via the CancerNext panel (Ambry Genetics) showed no

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guidelines instituted in 2017. We await comparison studies of resectability, survival, and recurrence rates. AB2018-23. Facilitating Obstetrician-Gynecologist Awareness of NCCN Guidelines Through Genetic Counseling Amy Cronister, MS, and Kristi Fissell

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James L. Mohler, Emmanuel S. Antonarakis, Andrew J. Armstrong, Anthony V. D’Amico, Brian J. Davis, Tanya Dorff, James A. Eastham, Charles A. Enke, Thomas A. Farrington, Celestia S. Higano, Eric Mark Horwitz, Michael Hurwitz, Joseph E. Ippolito, Christopher J. Kane, Michael R. Kuettel, Joshua M. Lang, Jesse McKenney, George Netto, David F. Penson, Elizabeth R. Plimack, Julio M. Pow-Sang, Thomas J. Pugh, Sylvia Richey, Mack Roach III, Stan Rosenfeld, Edward Schaeffer, Ahmad Shabsigh, Eric J. Small, Daniel E. Spratt, Sandy Srinivas, Jonathan Tward, Dorothy A. Shead, and Deborah A. Freedman-Cass

family genetic counseling, cancer risk syndromes, and assessment of personal risk for second cancers. Some patients with prostate cancer and their families may be at increased risk for breast and ovarian cancer, melanoma, and pancreatic cancer (HBOC

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NCCN Guidelines Insights: Ovarian Cancer, Version 1.2019

Featured Updates to the NCCN Guidelines

Deborah K. Armstrong, Ronald D. Alvarez, Jamie N. Bakkum-Gamez, Lisa Barroilhet, Kian Behbakht, Andrew Berchuck, Jonathan S. Berek, Lee-may Chen, Mihaela Cristea, Marie DeRosa, Adam C. ElNaggar, David M. Gershenson, Heidi J. Gray, Ardeshir Hakam, Angela Jain, Carolyn Johnston, Charles A. Leath III, Joyce Liu, Haider Mahdi, Daniela Matei, Michael McHale, Karen McLean, David M. O’Malley, Richard T. Penson, Sanja Percac-Lima, Elena Ratner, Steven W. Remmenga, Paul Sabbatini, Theresa L. Werner, Emese Zsiros, Jennifer L. Burns, and Anita M. Engh

options for maintenance therapy, all patients with histologically confirmed ovarian cancer should undergo genetic risk evaluation and BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing, if not previously performed. However, treatment should not be delayed for genetic counseling

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Mary Ann Morgan and Crystal S. Denlinger

emphasize the need to know types and frequency of tests, information on what could happen, what their long-term/late needs may be, symptoms to report, and whom to call with concerns. Many have questions about genetic counseling, risks, and testing for their

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Jeremy Matloff, Aimee Lucas, Alexandros D. Polydorides, and Steven H. Itzkowitz

-risk individuals. Thus, any formalized process should specifically include the following steps: 1) identifying positive results; 2) contacting the physician who is responsible for the affected individuals; 3) genetic counseling and testing if available and desired