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Omar Abdel-Rahman

important to guide health authorities and practitioners to provide a personalized cancer survivorship message (according to individual characteristics) instead of the currently available generic messages and advice that do not take into consideration the

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Arif Kamal, Tian Zhang, Steve Power, and P. Kelly Marcom

patients with cancer and the noncancer control population, a chi-square test was performed. Univariate logistic regression was used to determine patient and disease characteristics associated with the ordering of imaging. For determination of the attribute

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Jeffrey M. Martin, Tianyu Li, Matthew E. Johnson, Colin T. Murphy, Alan G. Howald, Marc C. Smaldone, Alexander Kutikov, David Y.T. Chen, Rosalia Viterbo, Richard E. Greenberg, Robert G. Uzzo, and Eric M. Horwitz

univariate analyses were performed. Results From 2003 to 2011, 475 patients received PPRT at FCCC (83 adjuvant and 392 salvage). The patient characteristics and descriptives are listed in Table 1 . Patients were more likely to receive adjuvant RT if

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Eric J. Roeland, Kathryn J. Ruddy, Thomas W. LeBlanc, Ryan D. Nipp, Gary Binder, Silvia Sebastiani, Ravi Potluri, Luke Schmerold, Eros Papademetriou, Lee Schwartzberg, and Rudolph M. Navari

We analyzed patient characteristics, HEC courses, and clinician practice patterns using descriptive statistics. Clinician HEC CINV prophylaxis adherence was categorized into deciles for each HEC, noting the clinicians with ≤90% adherence. Variability

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Lindsay M. Sabik, Kirsten Y. Eom, Zhaojun Sun, Jessica S. Merlin, Hailey W. Bulls, Patience Moyo, Jennifer A. Pruskowski, G.J. van Londen, Margaret Rosenzweig, and Yael Schenker

cancer diagnosis using chi-square tests. We then estimated multivariable logistic regression models to assess the association of patient characteristics, previous opioid receipt, treatment category, and year of diagnosis with receipt of an opioid

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Emily C. Harrold, Ahmad F. Idris, Niamh M. Keegan, Lynda Corrigan, Min Yuen Teo, Martin O’Donnell, Sean Tee Lim, Eimear Duff, Dearbhaile M. O’Donnell, M. John Kennedy, Sue Sukor, Cliona Grant, David G. Gallagher, Sonya Collier, Tara Kingston, Ann Marie O’Dwyer, and Sinead Cuffe

independent predictors of insomnia syndrome. Results Demographic and Clinical Characteristics Of the 337 patients invited to participate, 87% consented to study inclusion (n=294); 12 declined without explanation, 15 were too unwell to participate, 8 declined

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into clinical care paths. Further, cancer treatment is becoming increasingly personalized to the patient and tumor characteristics, thus increasing the complexity of decision-making. Methods: We developed a method to model guideline recommendations

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Nalan Nese, Ruta Gupta, Matthew H. T. Bui, and Mahul B. Amin

Edited by Kerrin G. Robinson

Carcinoma in situ (CIS) of the urinary bladder is defined as a flat lesion comprising of cytologically malignant cells which may involve either full or partial thickness of the urothelium. De novo CIS constitutes less than 3% of all urothelial neoplasms; however, CIS detected concurrently or secondarily during follow-up of urothelial carcinoma constitutes 45% and 90%, respectively, of bladder cancer. CIS is noted predominantly in male smokers in the sixth or seventh decade. Patients may present with dysuria, nocturia, and urinary frequency and urgency with microscopic hematuria. Cystoscopic findings may range from unremarkable to erythema or edema. Urine cytology is an important diagnostic tool. Cellular anaplasia, loss of polarity, discohesion, nuclear enlargement, hyperchromasia, pleomorphism, and atypical mitoses are the histopathologic hallmarks of CIS. Extensive denud ation of the urothelium, monomorphic appearance of the neoplastic cells, inflammatory atypia, radiation induced nuclear smudging, multinucleation, and pagetoid spread of CIS may cause diagnostic difficulties. Together with clinical and morphologic correlation, immunostaining with CK 20, p53 (full thickness), and CD44 (absence of staining) may help accurately diagnose CIS. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis of voided urine for amplification of chromosomes 3, 7, and 17 and deletion of 9p has high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing CIS in surveillance cases. Several other molecular markers, such as NMP 22 and BTA, are under evaluation or used variably in clinical pathology. Intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) instillation is considered the preferred treatment, with radical cystectomy being offered to refractory cases. Chemotherapy, α-interferon, and photodynamic therapy are other modalities that can be considered in BCG-refractory cases. Multifocality, involvement of prostatic urethra, and response to BCG remain the most important prognostic factors, although newer molecular markers are being evaluated for this entity. Patient outcome varies based on whether it is de novo development or diagnosed secondary to prior or concomitant papillary bladder cancer. From a clinical perspective, the principal determinants of outcome are extent of disease, involvement of prostatic urethra, response to therapy, and time to recurrence.

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Kah Poh Loh, Maya Abdallah, Meng-Shiou Shieh, Mihaela S. Stefan, Penelope S. Pekow, Peter K. Lindenauer, Supriya G. Mohile, Dilip Babu, and Tara Lagu

are reliably coded. Patient and Clinical Characteristics We collected demographics including age, sex, race, insurance provider, comorbidities (modified combined comorbidity score derived from the Elixhauser and Charlson comorbidity index