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NCCN Policy Summit: Reducing the Cancer Burden Through Prevention and Early Detection

Lindsey Bandini, Alyssa Schatz, Victoria Hood, Nikia Clark, Michael J. Hall, and Robert W. Carlson

Cancer prevention, screening, and early detection play an integral role in cancer incidence and outcomes. It is estimated that 30% to 50% of cancers worldwide are preventable, and it is well established that early detection of many cancers is associated with improved treatment outcomes. A recent NCCN Policy Summit: Reducing the Cancer Burden Through Prevention and Early Detection brought together healthcare providers, payers, policymakers, patient advocates, industry representatives, and technology representatives to explore challenges, triumphs, and outstanding questions surrounding current practices. Keynotes were delivered by Dr. Lisa Richardson, Director of the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control within the CDC, and Dr. Danielle Carnival, White House Cancer Moonshot Coordinator. Dr. Richardson focused on the field of public health, translating its utility in preventing and diagnosing cancer in the United States, while Dr. Carnival discussed ambitious goals by the Cancer Moonshot in reducing the cancer burden. Panelists highlighted characteristics of high-impact prevention and early detection programs, including how genetic testing has impacted this space. Existing programs are often challenged due to limitations in data, as well as financial, structural, and social barriers to motivating individuals to act on recommendations. Despite these barriers, we can learn from highly successful programs and should apply proven attributes, such as community engagement, more broadly.

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NCCN Policy Summit: Cancer Care in the Workplace: Building a 21st Century Workplace for Patients, Survivors, and Caretakers

Victoria Hood, Lindsey Bandini, Taneal Carter, Alyssa Schatz, John Sweetenham, Warren Smedley, Joanna Fawzy Morales, Rebecca V. Nellis, Randy A. Jones, Lynn Zonakis, and Robert W. Carlson

Survival rates for people with cancer and quality of life for survivors have increased significantly as a result of innovations in cancer treatment, improvements in early detection, and improved healthcare access. In the United States, 1 in 2 men and 1 in 3 women will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime. As more cancer survivors and patients remain in the workforce, employers must evaluate how they can adjust workplace policies to meet employee and business needs. Unfortunately, many people still encounter barriers to remaining in the workplace following a cancer diagnosis for themselves or a loved one. In an effort to explore the impacts of contemporary employment policies on patients with cancer, cancer survivors, and caregivers, NCCN hosted the Policy Summit “Cancer Care in the Workplace: Building a 21st Century Workplace for Cancer Patients, Survivors, and Caretakers” on June 17, 2022. This hybrid event, through keynotes and multistakeholder panel discussions, explored issues regarding employer benefit design, policy solutions, current best and promising practices for return to work, and how these issues impact treatment, survivorship, and caregiving in the cancer community.