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Marina Stasenko, R. Kevin Reynolds, Carolyn Johnston, Melissa Brackman, Karen McLean and Shitanshu Uppal

Objective: To determine the adherence to hematologic chemotherapy hold parameters for the carboplatin and dose-dense paclitaxel chemotherapy regimen in patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancers. Methods: This is a quality assessment survey study. All 26 NCCN Member Institutions were contacted electronically. Hematologic chemotherapy hold parameter values (absolute neutrophil count [ANC] and platelet count) on days 1, 8, and 15 of each cycle were queried. These hold parameters were compared with published data supporting the use of dose-dense chemotherapy regimens in ovarian cancer. Results: The overall survey response rate was 85% (22/26 sites). Of responders, 27% (6 sites) were fully adherent with all hematologic hold parameters and 64% (14 sites) used hold parameters that differed from the published protocol. Specifically, all of these sites use hold parameters higher than those recommended in the literature. Two centers did not have center-specific hold parameters. Conclusions: Carboplatin and dose-dense paclitaxel chemotherapy has been shown to increase progression-free survival and overall survival in patients with stage II–IV ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancers. However, our study found that two-thirds of queried sites had hold parameters higher than those in the published protocol. Using more stringent hold parameters may lead to compromised clinical outcomes. Further research is necessary to determine the optimal strategy to increase individual site adherence to chemotherapy hematologic hold parameters as specified in published trials.

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Edward E. Partridge, Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum, Susan M. Campos, Patrick J. Fahey, Michael Farmer, Rochelle L. Garcia, Anna Giuliano, Howard W. Jones III, Subodh M. Lele, Richard W. Lieberman, Stewart L. Massad, Mark A. Morgan, R. Kevin Reynolds, Helen E. Rhodes, Diljeet K. Singh, Karen Smith-McCune, Nelson Teng, Cornelia Liu Trimble, Fidel Valea and Sharon Wilczynski

Overview Despite a significant decrease in the incidence and mortality of cervical carcinoma in the United States, an estimated 12,200 women will be diagnosed with the disease in 2010, with 4210 expected deaths.1 High-risk groups include women without access to health care and those who have immigrated to the United States from countries where cervical cancer screening is not routinely performed.2 Because cervical cytology screening is the current method for early detection of this neoplasm, the purpose of these guidelines is to provide direction for the evaluation and management of cervical cytology. These guidelines include recommendations on screening techniques, initiation, and frequency of screening, and management of abnormal screening results including colposcopy. Cervical cytology screening techniques include liquid-based cytology or conventional Papanicolaou (Pap) smears. Unless specifically noted, these techniques are collectively referred to as cervical cytology in this discussion. Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing for primary cervical cancer has been approved by the FDA; several diagnostic tests are available (e.g., HPV high-risk and HPV 16/18 DNA tests, Hybrid Capture 2 HPV DNA test). However, HPV DNA testing is not recommended in women younger than 21 years.3 HPV DNA testing for high-risk virus types can also be used as a component of both primary screening and workup of abnormal cytology results; it is not useful to test for low-risk virus types.3 (See HPV DNA Testing on page 1378 for more detail about these tests.) Colposcopy, along with colposcopically directed biopsies, is the primary method for evaluating women with abnormal cervical cytologies....
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Wui-Jin Koh, Benjamin E. Greer, Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum, Sachin M. Apte, Susana M. Campos, John Chan, Kathleen R. Cho, David Cohn, Marta Ann Crispens, Nefertiti DuPont, Patricia J. Eifel, David K. Gaffney, Robert L. Giuntoli II, Ernest Han, Warner K. Huh, John R. Lurain III, Lainie Martin, Mark A. Morgan, David Mutch, Steven W. Remmenga, R. Kevin Reynolds, William Small Jr, Nelson Teng, Todd Tillmanns, Fidel A. Valea, Nicole R. McMillian and Miranda Hughes

These NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Cervical Cancer focus on early-stage disease, because it occurs more frequently in the United States. After careful clinical evaluation and staging, the primary treatment of early-stage cervical cancer is either surgery or radiotherapy. These guidelines include fertility-sparing and non-fertility-sparing treatment for those with early-stage disease, which is disease confined to the uterus. A new fertility-sparing algorithm was added for select patients with stage IA and IB1 disease..

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Wui-Jin Koh, Benjamin E. Greer, Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum, Sachin M. Apte, Susana M. Campos, John Chan, Kathleen R. Cho, David Cohn, Marta Ann Crispens, Nefertiti DuPont, Patricia J. Eifel, Amanda Nickles Fader, Christine M. Fisher, David K. Gaffney, Suzanne George, Ernest Han, Warner K. Huh, John R. Lurain III, Lainie Martin, David Mutch, Steven W. Remmenga, R. Kevin Reynolds, William Small Jr, Nelson Teng, Todd Tillmanns, Fidel A. Valea, Nicole McMillian and Miranda Hughes

Adenocarcinoma of the endometrium (also known as endometrial cancer or more broadly as uterine cancer or carcinoma of the uterine corpus) is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract in the United States. An estimated 49,560 new uterine cancer cases will occur in 2013, with 8190 deaths resulting from the disease. Uterine sarcomas (stromal/mesenchymal tumors) are uncommon malignancies, accounting for approximately 3% of all uterine cancers. The NCCN Guidelines for Uterine Neoplasms describe malignant epithelial carcinomas and uterine sarcomas; each of these major categories contains specific histologic groups that require different management. This excerpt of these guidelines focuses on early-stage disease.

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Benjamin E. Greer, Wui-Jin Koh, Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum, Sachin M. Apte, Susana M. Campos, John Chan, Kathleen R. Cho, Larry Copeland, Marta Ann Crispens, Nefertiti DuPont, Patricia J. Eifel, David K. Gaffney, Warner K. Huh, Daniel S. Kapp, John R. Lurain III, Lainie Martin, Mark A. Morgan, Robert J. Morgan Jr., David Mutch, Steven W. Remmenga, R. Kevin Reynolds, William Small Jr., Nelson Teng and Fidel A. Valea

Overview An estimated 12,200 new cases of cervical cancer will be diagnosed in the United States in 2010, and 4200 people will die of the disease.1 Cervical cancer rates are decreasing among women in the United States, although incidence remains high among Hispanic/Latino, black, and Asian women.2–5 However, cervical cancer is a major world health problem for women. The global yearly incidence of cervical cancer for 2002 was 493,200; the annual death rate was 273,500. It is the third most common cancer in women worldwide,6,7 with 78% of cases occurring in developing countries, where cervical cancer is the second most frequent cause of cancer death in women. Persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is regarded as the most important factor contributing to the development of cervical cancer. A relationship seems to exist between the incidence of cervical cancer and the prevalence of HPV in the population. The prevalence of chronic HPV in countries with a high incidence of cervical cancer is 10% to 20%, whereas its prevalence in low-incidence countries is 5% to 10%.6 Immunization against HPV prevents infection with certain types of HPV and, thus, is expected to prevent specific HPV cancer in women (see NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology [NCCN Guidelines] for Cervical Cancer Screening, in this issue; to view the most recent version of these guidelines, visit the NCCN Web site at www.NCCN.org).8–12 Other epidemiologic risk factors associated with cervical cancer are a history of smoking, parity, contraceptive use, early age at onset of coitus, larger number...
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Benjamin E. Greer, Wui-Jin Koh, Nadeem Abu-Rustum, Michael A. Bookman, Robert E. Bristow, Susana M. Campos, Kathleen R. Cho, Larry Copeland, Marta Ann Crispens, Patricia J. Eifel, Warner K. Huh, Wainwright Jaggernauth, Daniel S. Kapp, John J. Kavanagh, John R. Lurain III, Mark Morgan, Robert J. Morgan Jr, C. Bethan Powell, Steven W. Remmenga, R. Kevin Reynolds, Angeles Alvarez Secord, William Small Jr and Nelson Teng

Uterine Neoplasms Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology NCCN Categories of Evidence and Consensus Category 1: The recommendation is based on high-level evidence (e.g., randomized controlled trials) and there is uniform NCCN consensus. Category 2A: The recommendation is based on lowerlevel evidence and there is uniform NCCN consensus. Category 2B: The recommendation is based on lowerlevel evidence and there is nonuniform NCCN consensus (but no major disagreement). Category 3: The recommendation is based on any level of evidence but reflects major disagreement. All recommendations are category 2A unless otherwise noted. Clinical trials: The NCCN believes that the best management for any cancer patient is in a clinical trial. Participation in clinical trials is especially encouraged. Overview Adenocarcinoma of the endometrium is the most common malignancy in the female genital tract in the United States. An estimated 40,100 new diagnoses of uterine cancer and 7470 deaths from this disease will occur in 2008.1 Uterine sarcomas are uncommon and account for approximately 1 in 12 of all uterine cancers.2 These guidelines describe epithelial carcinomas and uterine sarcomas; each of these major categories contains specific histologic groups that require different management (see page 500). By definition, these guidelines cannot incorporate all possible clinical variations and are not intended to replace good clinical judgment or individualization of treatments. Exceptions to the rule were discussed among panel members during the process of developing these guidelines. For patients with suspected uterine neoplasms, initial preoperative evaluation includes a history and physical examination, endometrial biopsy, chest radiograph, a CBC,...
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Wui-Jin Koh, Benjamin E. Greer, Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum, Sachin M. Apte, Susana M. Campos, Kathleen R. Cho, Christina Chu, David Cohn, Marta Ann Crispens, Don S. Dizon, Oliver Dorigo, Patricia J. Eifel, Christine M. Fisher, Peter Frederick, David K. Gaffney, Suzanne George, Ernest Han, Susan Higgins, Warner K. Huh, John R. Lurain III, Andrea Mariani, David Mutch, Amanda Nickles Fader, Steven W. Remmenga, R. Kevin Reynolds, Todd Tillmanns, Fidel A. Valea, Catheryn M. Yashar, Nicole R. McMillian and Jillian L. Scavone

The NCCN Guidelines for Uterine Neoplasms provide interdisciplinary recommendations for treating endometrial carcinoma and uterine sarcomas. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the NCCN Uterine Neoplasms Panel's 2016 discussions and major guideline updates for treating uterine sarcomas. During this most recent update, the panel updated the mesenchymal tumor classification to correspond with recent updates to the WHO tumor classification system. Additionally, the panel revised its systemic therapy recommendations to reflect new data and collective clinical experience. These NCCN Guidelines Insights elaborate on the rationale behind these recent changes.

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Wui-Jin Koh, Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum, Sarah Bean, Kristin Bradley, Susana M. Campos, Kathleen R. Cho, Hye Sook Chon, Christina Chu, David Cohn, Marta Ann Crispens, Shari Damast, Oliver Dorigo, Patricia J. Eifel, Christine M. Fisher, Peter Frederick, David K. Gaffney, Suzanne George, Ernest Han, Susan Higgins, Warner K. Huh, John R. Lurain III, Andrea Mariani, David Mutch, Christa Nagel, Larissa Nekhlyudov, Amanda Nickles Fader, Steven W. Remmenga, R. Kevin Reynolds, Todd Tillmanns, Stefanie Ueda, Emily Wyse, Catheryn M. Yashar, Nicole R. McMillian and Jillian L. Scavone

Endometrial carcinoma is a malignant epithelial tumor that forms in the inner lining, or endometrium, of the uterus. Endometrial carcinoma is the most common gynecologic malignancy. Approximately two-thirds of endometrial carcinoma cases are diagnosed with disease confined to the uterus. The complete NCCN Guidelines for Uterine Neoplasms provide recommendations for the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of endometrial cancer and uterine sarcoma. This manuscript discusses guiding principles for the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of early-stage endometrial carcinoma as well as evidence for these recommendations.

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Wui-Jin Koh, Benjamin E. Greer, Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum, Sachin M. Apte, Susana M. Campos, Kathleen R. Cho, Christina Chu, David Cohn, Marta Ann Crispens, Oliver Dorigo, Patricia J. Eifel, Christine M. Fisher, Peter Frederick, David K. Gaffney, Ernest Han, Warner K. Huh, John R. Lurain III, David Mutch, Amanda Nickles Fader, Steven W. Remmenga, R. Kevin Reynolds, Nelson Teng, Todd Tillmanns, Fidel A. Valea, Catheryn M. Yashar, Nicole R. McMillian and Jillian L. Scavone

The NCCN Guidelines for Cervical Cancer provide interdisciplinary recommendations for treating cervical cancer. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the NCCN Cervical Cancer Panel’s discussion and major guideline updates from 2014 and 2015. The recommended systemic therapy options for recurrent and metastatic cervical cancer were amended upon panel review of new survival data and the FDA’s approval of bevacizumab for treating late-stage cervical cancer. This article outlines relevant data and provides insight into panel decisions regarding various combination regimens. Additionally, a new section was added to provide additional guidance on key principles of evaluation and surgical staging in cervical cancer. This article highlights 2 areas of active investigation and debate from this new section: sentinel lymph node mapping and fertility-sparing treatment approaches.

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Wui-Jin Koh, Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum, Sarah Bean, Kristin Bradley, Susana M. Campos, Kathleen R. Cho, Hye Sook Chon, Christina Chu, Rachel Clark, David Cohn, Marta Ann Crispens, Shari Damast, Oliver Dorigo, Patricia J. Eifel, Christine M. Fisher, Peter Frederick, David K. Gaffney, Ernest Han, Warner K. Huh, John R. Lurain III, Andrea Mariani, David Mutch, Christa Nagel, Larissa Nekhlyudov, Amanda Nickles Fader, Steven W. Remmenga, R. Kevin Reynolds, Todd Tillmanns, Stefanie Ueda, Emily Wyse, Catheryn M. Yashar, Nicole R. McMillian and Jillian L. Scavone

Cervical cancer is a malignant epithelial tumor that forms in the uterine cervix. Most cases of cervical cancer are preventable through human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination, routine screening, and treatment of precancerous lesions. However, due to inadequate screening protocols in many regions of the world, cervical cancer remains the fourth-most common cancer in women globally. The complete NCCN Guidelines for Cervical Cancer provide recommendations for the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of cervical cancer. This manuscript discusses guiding principles for the workup, staging, and treatment of early stage and locally advanced cervical cancer, as well as evidence for these recommendations. For recommendations regarding treatment of recurrent or metastatic disease, please see the full guidelines on NCCN.org.