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Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

Cure rates for Hodgkin disease/lymphoma have increased to such an extent that the overriding treatment considerations often relate to long-term toxicity, especially for patients with early- or intermediate-stage disease. Current management programs are based on comprehensive clinical staging followed by combined modality therapy for patients with favorable and intermediate prognosis, or chemotherapy alone for patients with advanced disease. Relapse is uncommon, but secondary management with peripheral stem cell transplantation may be effective. The excellent prognosis for these patients mandates careful long-term follow-up to detect late treatment effects.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs) may be classified on the basis of morphology, natural history, and immunophenotypic and molecular characteristics. These guidelines were developed for more common NHL histologic types, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and for less common entities with unique natural histories and therapies, such as marginal zone lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, and highly aggressive lymphoma subtypes, including Burkitt's, and lymphoblastic lymphomas and AIDS-related B-cell lymphomas. Certain components of the diagnosis and therapy of the various NHLs are similar. In all cases, an accurate pathologic diagnosis must first be made.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

Infectious diseases are important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer. In certain instances, the malignancy itself can predispose patients to severe or recurrent infections. Neutropenia has been recognized for many decades as a major risk factor, and effective strategies to anticipate, prevent, and manage infectious complications in patients with cancer experiencing neutropenia have led to improved outcomes. Reflecting the heterogeneity of immunocompromised conditions in patients with cancer and the spectrum of pathogens to which they are susceptible, NCCN expanded the scope of the Fever and Neutropenia Panel in 2007 to create guidelines on Prevention and Treatment of Cancer-Related Infections. These guidelines, newly updated for 2008, characterize major categories of immunologic deficits in persons with cancer and the major pathogens to which they are susceptible.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org