Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 17 of 17 items for

  • Author: William T. McGivney x
  • User-accessible content x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

William T. McGivney

Full access

William T. McGivney

Full access

William T. McGivney

In the torrent of writings in health policy and in the sagacity of legislative discussions and health care reform, policy makers vie for inclusion, or even a vague recognition, of their personal view and plan for improving decision-making in the health care system. In these discussions and debates, oncology is always a focus because of the incidence of the diseases and the evolution of the diseases into chronic conditions, and because of the expense of the plethora of innovative biomedical technologies being introduced. If we could only have a system to support clinical and policy decision-making that: was evidence-based; had broad access to the expertise and experience of the best and the brightest researchers and clinicians; was rapid and timely in its evaluation and communication of recommendations about procedures, drugs, and devices; was widely accepted and used by clinicians, patients, and payors; was publicly transparent and participatory; developed comprehensive guidelines with up-to-date recommendations; and provided worldwide access to the guidelines free of charge. How would such a system be designed? Most likely, one should establish tumor-specific panels of experts representing the many disciplines involved in the complex management of these diseases. Formal meetings would be held on an annual basis to evaluate new scientific evidence, decisions of the FDA, and other important events (e.g., the halting of clinical trials for positive or negative reasons). In addition, the panels could be called upon on very short notice to meet by phone to discuss “late-breaking news.” The product of such a scientific,...
Full access

William T. McGivney

Full access

William T. McGivney

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) and our 21 member institutions are dedicated to improving the care available to patients around the world. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) and the attendant scientific, evaluative process has become the model for the development and communication of clinical recommendations based on evidence review integrated with expert judgment. The NCCN is pleased to extend our scientific, clinical collaboration to thought leaders in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). The NCCN–MENA Guidelines Congress held in Abu Dhabi, running from April 23 to 26, 2009, brought together leading clinicians to review the NCCN Guidelines and supporting data and to discuss the applicability of the NCCN Guidelines to patients in this part of our world. As always, the clinical discussion highlighted areas for improvement and clarification in the NCCN Guidelines. As Drs. Azim, Jazieh, and Jahanzeb point out in the accompanying introduction, the work has begun and the initial thinking is published is this “Abu Dhabi Declaration.” Much work remains as experts identify issues for study in trials or through other research methods, issues that relate to possible differences in genetic makeup and its expression, differences in the availability of technology across the 16 countries, and other factors. The NCCN thanks our colleagues in the Middle East and North Africa for their willingness to share their knowledge, expertise, and experience as we work to improve cancer care for patients whom we serve....
Full access

William T. McGivney

On June 5, 2008, The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) recognized the NCCN Drugs & Biologics Compendium (NCCN Compendium) as an authoritative source of information to be considered regarding coverage determinations about the use of drugs and biologics in cancer care. CMS and its intermediaries and carriers cover specific indications for the use of drugs and biologics if such indications are listed in recognized compendia. The main use of drug compendia is in decisions about indications of drugs beyond the FDA-approved label. At this writing, 2 other compendia are recognized: the American Hospital Formulary Service Compendium (AHFS) and DrugDex. The all important guidance from CMS to carriers and intermediaries on the use of the NCCN Compendium and other compendia likely will be released by the end of July 2008. The NCCN Compendium fully met the criteria established by the Medicare Evidence Development Coverage Advisory Committee (MedCAC) at its March 30, 2006 meeting. Of the 6 compendia evaluated by the MedCAC at that meeting, the NCCN Compendium received the best scores, by far, on important characteristics such as being evidence-based, having public transparency for evaluation of therapies, and including identification and notification of potential conflicts of interest. The recognition by CMS of the NCCN Compendium is the result of a collaborative effort over 3 years between the agency and the NCCN. The NCCN has added many features, such as a multi-faceted search capacity to facilitate use by decision-makers. Importantly, as noted by CMS, NCCN makes the NCCN Compendium available...
Full access

William T. McGivney

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) is pleased to present the first issue of our official journal, JNCCN. One of the interesting tasks of launching a new journal is clarifying what the journal's goals and mission should be. It is important to recognize how that mission fits into and feeds the greater goals of the organization itself. In that context, the goal of JNCCN is easy to understand—to address the issues involved in the appropriate management of the broad spectrum of cancers in a way that leads to improved patient care. To meet that goal, each issue of JNCCN will present a selection of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology along with expert reviews and commentary on controversial issues and issues that are important to clinical decision making. JNCCN also discusses the practical application of the guidelines and outcomes data in everyday practice. Finally, the journal will publish original research that serves to advance the understanding of disease processes and their diagnosis and treatment. The decision to create JNCCN was made in response to the tremendous success of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology and the continual demand for expanding the discussions of how the guidelines are created and applied. Unlike some guideline efforts across the many fields of medicine, the NCCN guidelines have been widely hailed, used, and accepted as valuable tools because they are delivered in a timely fashion, updated at least annually, and are specific in the recommendations that they include. Furthermore, the NCCN guidelines...