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Maxim Norkin and John R. Wingard

febrile neutropenia alone if they are receiving Candida prophylaxis, lack biomarker positivity, and have no clinical signs or imaging abnormalities suggestive of IFI. 13 However, any high-risk patient with a nodular pulmonary infiltrate should be

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Amy A. Kirkham, Karen A. Gelmon, Cheri L. Van Patten, Kelcey A. Bland, Holly Wollmann, Donald C. McKenzie, Taryne Landry, and Kristin L. Campbell

: implication and proposed mechanisms . World J Clin Oncol 2014 ; 5 : 272 – 282 . 10.5306/wjco.v5.i3.272 25114844 23. Kuderer NM , Dale DC , Crawford J , . Mortality, morbidity, and cost associated with febrile neutropenia in adult cancer patients

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Lindsey Robert Baden, William Bensinger, Michael Angarone, Corey Casper, Erik R. Dubberke, Alison G. Freifeld, Ramiro Garzon, John N. Greene, John P. Greer, James I. Ito, Judith E. Karp, Daniel R. Kaul, Earl King, Emily Mackler, Kieren A. Marr, Jose G. Montoya, Ashley Morris-Engemann, Peter G. Pappas, Ken Rolston, Brahm Segal, Susan K. Seo, Sankar Swaminathan, Maoko Naganuma, and Dorothy A. Shead

controls. 205 , 206 During community outbreaks, influenza infections may represent a significant proportion of episodes of febrile neutropenia. 207 Influenza infections in severely immunocompromised patients with cancer are often associated with

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Suzanne C. O'Neill, Claudine Isaacs, Calvin Chao, Huei-Ting Tsai, Chunfu Liu, Bola F. Ekezue, Nandini Selvam, Larry G. Kessler, Marc D. Schwartz, Tania Lobo, and Arnold L. Potosky

. 38. Chia VM Page JH Rodriguez R . Chronic comorbid conditions associated with risk of febrile neutropenia in breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy . Breast Cancer Res Treat 2013 ; 138 : 621 – 631 . 39. Hall PS McCabe C

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David S. Ettinger, Douglas E. Wood, Dara L. Aisner, Wallace Akerley, Jessica R. Bauman, Ankit Bharat, Debora S. Bruno, Joe Y. Chang, Lucian R. Chirieac, Malcolm DeCamp, Thomas J. Dilling, Jonathan Dowell, Gregory A. Durm, Scott Gettinger, Travis E. Grotz, Matthew A. Gubens, Aparna Hegde, Rudy P. Lackner, Michael Lanuti, Jules Lin, Billy W. Loo Jr, Christine M. Lovly, Fabien Maldonado, Erminia Massarelli, Daniel Morgensztern, Thomas Ng, Gregory A. Otterson, Sandip P. Patel, Tejas Patil, Patricio M. Polanco, Gregory J. Riely, Jonathan Riess, Steven E. Schild, Theresa A. Shapiro, Aditi P. Singh, James Stevenson, Alda Tam, Tawee Tanvetyanon, Jane Yanagawa, Stephen C. Yang, Edwin Yau, Kristina M. Gregory, and Miranda Hughes

were not predictive of survival. Grade 3 or worse treatment-related adverse events were reported in 30% (14/46) of patients; the most common events were increased lipase and febrile neutropenia (7% [3/46] for both). 22 None of the adverse events were

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William G. Wierda, John C. Byrd, Jeremy S. Abramson, Syed F. Bilgrami, Greg Bociek, Danielle Brander, Jennifer Brown, Asher A. Chanan-Khan, Julio C. Chavez, Steve E. Coutre, Randall S. Davis, Christopher D. Fletcher, Brian Hill, Brad S. Kahl, Manali Kamdar, Lawrence D. Kaplan, Nadia Khan, Thomas J. Kipps, Shuo Ma, Sami Malek, Anthony Mato, Claudio Mosse, Vishala T. Neppalli, Mazyar Shadman, Tanya Siddiqi, Deborah Stephens, Nina Wagner, Mary A. Dwyer, and Hema Sundar

treatment-related grade 1/2 adverse events. Incidence of grade 3/4 febrile neutropenia and anemia were reported in 5% and 20% of patients, respectively. In a phase II study of 25 patients (16 with relapsed CLL and 9 with Richter's transformation to DLBCL

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Pamala A. Pawloski, Gabriel A. Brooks, Matthew E. Nielsen, and Barbara A. Olson-Bullis

-stimulating factor use without an increase in febrile neutropenia rates, illustrating the positive impact these powerful tools can have on clinical oncology care. 50 Further analyses of the use of these tools with appropriate study designs and analytic methods are

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P. Connor Johnson, Caron Jacobson, Alisha Yi, Anna Saucier, Tejaswini M. Dhawale, Ashley Nelson, Mitchell W. Lavoie, Mathew J. Reynolds, Carlisle E.W. Topping, Matthew J. Frigault, and Areej El-Jawahri

determine reasons for hospital readmissions. 12 In the schema for our study, these reasons included symptoms, fever without a source, febrile neutropenia, confirmed infection, dehydration/electrolyte abnormalities, planned hospitalization

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William G. Wierda, John C. Byrd, Jeremy S. Abramson, Syed F. Bilgrami, Greg Bociek, Danielle Brander, Jennifer Brown, Asher A. Chanan-Khan, Julio C. Chavez, Steve E. Coutre, Randall S. Davis, Christopher D. Fletcher, Brian Hill, Brad S. Kahl, Manali Kamdar, Lawrence D. Kaplan, Nadia Khan, Thomas J. Kipps, Megan S. Lim, Shuo Ma, Sami Malek, Anthony Mato, Claudio Mosse, Mazyar Shadman, Tanya Siddiqi, Deborah Stephens, Suchitra Sundaram, Nina Wagner, Mary Dwyer, and Hema Sundar

arms (86% and 85% for ibrutinib + obinutuzumab and chlorambucil + obinutuzumab, respectively). Pneumonia (5%), atrial fibrillation (4%), febrile neutropenia (4%), and pyrexia (4%) were the most common adverse events in the ibrutinib + obinutuzumab arm

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Robert W. Carlson, Susan Moench, Arti Hurria, Lodovico Balducci, Harold J. Burstein, Lori J. Goldstein, William J. Gradishar, Kevin S. Hughes, Mohammad Jahanzeb, Stuart M. Lichtman, Lawrence B. Marks, Joan S. McClure, Beryl McCormick, Lisle M. Nabell, Lori J. Pierce, Mary Lou Smith, Neal S. Topham, Tiffany A. Traina, John H. Ward, and Eric P. Winer

prophylaxis with granulocyte-colony stimulating factors (G-CSF) versus placebo or untreated controls in patients undergoing chemotherapy indicated that G-CSF therapy was associated with decreased incidences of febrile neutropenia and early death, and a higher