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Survivorship, Version 2.2018, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology

Crystal S. Denlinger, Tara Sanft, K. Scott Baker, Gregory Broderick, Wendy Demark-Wahnefried, Debra L. Friedman, Mindy Goldman, Melissa Hudson, Nazanin Khakpour, Allison King, Divya Koura, Robin M. Lally, Terry S. Langbaum, Allison L. McDonough, Michelle Melisko, Jose G. Montoya, Kathi Mooney, Javid J. Moslehi, Tracey O'Connor, Linda Overholser, Electra D. Paskett, Jeffrey Peppercorn, William Pirl, M. Alma Rodriguez, Kathryn J. Ruddy, Paula Silverman, Sophia Smith, Karen L. Syrjala, Amye Tevaarwerk, Susan G. Urba, Mark T. Wakabayashi, Phyllis Zee, Nicole R. McMillian, and Deborah A. Freedman-Cass

, be addressed in all survivors who have completed anthracycline therapy. In addition, survivors with a history of anthracycline therapy should be advised to engage in regular physical activity, eat a healthy diet, and avoid behaviors that may increase

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Searching for Survivor-Specific Services at NCI-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers: A Qualitative Assessment

Betsy Rolland and Jordan Eschler

explicitly discussed prevention services with respect to cancer survivors. Information provided on prevention topics was generally vague, and might advise survivors to “be active” or “eat a healthy diet,” without any mention of available supportive services

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An Infant-Type Hemispheric Glioma With SOX5::ALK: A Novel Fusion

Chia Chin Tsai, Man-Hsu Huang, Chia-Lang Fang, Kevin Li-Chun Hsieh, Tsung-Han Hsieh, Wan-Ling Ho, Hsi Chang, Min-Lan Tsai, Yu-Chien Kao, James S. Miser, Tai-Tong Wong, Min-Yu Su, and Yen-Lin Liu

discussion, we did not use lipid-lowering agents, and the infant remained on a regular diet. His development was within normal range. Figure 4. The patient’s growth chart according to the WHO standard, with major treatment events annotated

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Advocating for Equity in Cancer Care

James McCanney, Terrell Johnson, Lindsey A.M. Bandini, Shonta Chambers, Lynette Bonar, and Robert W. Carlson

likely to engage in shared decision-making. Furthermore, individuals living on the Navajo Nation frequently lack consistent running water, electricity, and proper refrigeration, which may present challenges to maintaining a healthy diet throughout and

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Plenary Session—The Patient Journey: Cancer Survivor Care

Presented by: Shannon M. Ansbaugh, Gary Deng, Rev. George F. Handzo, and Karen L. Syrjala

Moderated by: Jessica R. Bauman

as diet, exercise, stress management, and sleep/circadian rhythm. The goal of these lifestyle changes is not only to solve acute issues, but also to contribute to a sense of meaning, he said. Specific therapies are then prescribed to address certain

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Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Oncology, Version 2.2024, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology

Smita Bhatia, Alberto S. Pappo, Melissa Acquazzino, Wendy A. Allen-Rhoades, Marie Barnett, Scott C. Borinstein, Robert Casey, Sun Choo, Rashmi Chugh, Shira Dinner, Ralph Ermoian, Douglas Fair, Noah Federman, Jeanelle Folbrecht, Shipra Gandhi, Julie Germann, Robert Goldsby, Robert Hayashi, Alex Y. Huang, Mary S. Huang, Linda A. Jacobs, Cathy Lee-Miller, Michael P. Link, John A. Livingston, Maryam Lustberg, Marcio Malogolowkin, Kevin C. Oeffinger, Christine A. Pratilas, Damon Reed, Jodi Skiles, Margaret von Mehren, Nicholas Yeager, Sarah Montgomery, and Lisa Hang

single institution, the majority of young adults with cancer identified the following information as most important: information on their specific malignancy, effects of treatment on fertility, information on maintaining a healthy diet, and exercise

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Practical Advances in Stool Screening for Colorectal Cancer

Jonathan Potack and Steven H. Itzkowitz

1203 patients in Australia who were undergoing CRC screening with FIT. Patients were randomized to either no dietary restrictions or a low peroxidase diet, as required for gFOBT. The rate of completing screening was 12.6% higher in the group with no

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Biomarkers in Colorectal Cancer Screening

Minhhuyen T. Nguyen and David S. Weinberg

FIT cutoff value of 20 mcg/g. 8 Generally, patients prefer FIT to gFOBT because only one stool sample is required and no diet or medication alterations are needed. 7 FIT results can be quantified, which is useful when colonoscopy follow-up capability

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Colorectal Cancer Screening, Version 1.2015

Dawn Provenzale, Kory Jasperson, Dennis J. Ahnen, Harry Aslanian, Travis Bray, Jamie A. Cannon, Donald S. David, Dayna S. Early, Deborah Erwin, James M. Ford, Francis M. Giardiello, Samir Gupta, Amy L. Halverson, Stanley R. Hamilton, Heather Hampel, Mohammad K. Ismail, Jason B. Klapman, David W. Larson, Audrey J. Lazenby, Patrick M. Lynch, Robert J. Mayer, Reid M. Ness, M. Sambasiva Rao, Scott E. Regenbogen, Moshe Shike, Gideon Steinbach, David Weinberg, Mary A. Dwyer, Deborah A. Freedman-Cass, and Susan Darlow

reaction with nonhuman heme in food and blood from the upper gastrointestinal tract. To compensate for these limitations, guaiac FOBT should be performed on 3 successive stool specimens obtained while the patient adheres to a prescribed diet. There is

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Optimizing Patient Care in Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia: A Multidisciplinary Approach

Hema Sundar and Jerald Radich

myalgia that did not improve despite multiple attempts at adverse effect management (diet changes, over-the-counter antidiarrheals, and ibuprofen). The symptoms became significant enough that she often did not take her daily imatinib. Imatinib was