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Patrick A. Brown and Bijal Shah

toxicity,” said Dr. Shah. “I think we have to be cognizant of the fact that these therapies will make people sick in the short term.” As for CRS, more common symptoms include fever and hypotension. However, some patients may experience more severe

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Presenter: Maria Alma Rodriguez

, and rubella (MMR), oral typhoid, yellow fever, rotavirus, nasal influenza, and varicella—are contraindicated or should be used with caution in actively immunocompromised cancer survivors and their close contacts. Per the NCCN Guidelines, live

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were in distress because they were not prepared to witness the patient’s experience, especially with CRS, with 105° fevers, and patients wrapped in ice and bear huggers, not to mention the neurotoxicity,” she said. Patients and caregivers also seemed

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Presenter: Aaron T. Gerds

70% of patients have symptoms driven primarily by cytokines, such as fevers and night sweats. Many patients also experience cytopenias, particularly anemia and thrombocytopenia. 2 , 3 “And, of course, it is a disease that carries a shortened life

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Presenter: Natalie S. Callander

(84%), its severity was limited in most participants. “Patients typically develop a fever, chills, or changes in blood pressure within 24 hours of receiving idecabtagene vicleucel, but most are responsive to tocilizumab or steroids,” said Dr. Callander

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Maxim Norkin and John R. Wingard

disseminated infection less commonly seen. Candida infections of the mucosa occur early and throughout the course of neutropenia and/or immunosuppressive therapy. Candida fungemia is rarely the cause of first neutropenic fever, but may be a cause of

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Gary H. Lyman and Marek S. Poniewierski

) risk index score: 10 years of use for identifying low-risk febrile neutropenic cancer patients . Support Care Cancer 2013 ; 21 : 1487 – 1495 . 43. Talcott JA Siegel RD Finberg R . Risk assessment in cancer patients with fever and

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Atish D. Choudhury and Philip W. Kantoff

was accompanied by increased toxicity compared with mitoxantrone, with higher rates of grade 3 or greater neutropenia (82% vs. 58%), neutropenic fever (8% vs. 1%), and diarrhea (6% vs. <1%), along with greater requirements for dose reductions (12% vs

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Yanli Li, Leila Family, Su-Jau Yang, Zandra Klippel, John H. Page, and Chun Chao

defined using one of the following methods: (1) neutropenia (ICD-9 code 288.0) and fever (ICD-9 code 780.6) within 7 days of hospitalization; (2) absolute neutrophil count (ANC) <1,000/mcL and fever (ICD-9 code 780.6) within 7 days of hospitalization; (3

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Kimberly Davies, Matthew Barth, Saro Armenian, Anthony N. Audino, Phillip Barnette, Branko Cuglievan, Hilda Ding, James B. Ford, Paul J. Galardy, Rebecca Gardner, Rabi Hanna, Robert Hayashi, Alexandra E. Kovach, Andrea Judit Machnitz, Kelly W. Maloney, Lianna Marks, Kristin Page, Anne F. Reilly, Joanna L. Weinstein, Ana C. Xavier, Nicole R. McMillian, and Deborah A. Freedman-Cass

expert opinion. The complete details of the development and update of the NCCN Guidelines are available on the NCCN website ( NCCN.org ). Initial Presentation Patients with DLBCL and BL may present with fever, chills, night sweats, unexplained