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Amy A. Kirkham, Karen A. Gelmon, Cheri L. Van Patten, Kelcey A. Bland, Holly Wollmann, Donald C. McKenzie, Taryne Landry, and Kristin L. Campbell

survival. 1 Proposed mechanisms for this positive effect on chemotherapy treatment tolerance include exercise-related amelioration of specific symptoms or toxicities that cause treatment reductions or delays, including neutropenia, fatigue, and neuropathy

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Paul F. Engstrom

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Susana M. Campos, Mei Sheng Duh, Patrick Lefebvre, and James Rosberg

. Factors influencing quality of life in cancer patents: anemia and fatigue . Semin Oncol 1998 ; 25 : 43 – 46 . 4 Curt GA . Impact of fatigue on quality of life in oncology patients . Semin Hematol 2000 ; 37 : 14 – 17 . 5 Sobrero

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Lindsey A. Kluck and Ronald S. Go

Re: Sriram Yennurajalingam, Nizar M. Tannir, Janet L. Williams, et al. A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Panax Ginseng for Cancer-Related Fatigue in Patients with Advanced Cancer. J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2017

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Nishanth Thalambedu, Waqas Ullah, Ammar Ashfaq, Yasir Khan, Mishal Shaukat, and Qian Zhang

.11) Figure 1 . Paobinostat had a significantly lower risk of lymphopenia (OR 0.25 95% CI 0.15-0.42, p=<0.0001) Panobinostat was however, associated with two times more risk of anemia (OR 2.82 95% CI 1.82-4.38, p=<0.0001), fatigue (OR 2.36 95% CI 1.64-3.38, p

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Daniel Shasha, Pierre Cremieux, and Louis Harrison

patients undergoing radiation therapy . Semin Oncol 2001 ; 28 ( suppl 8 ): 54 – 59 . 4 Irvine D Vincent L Graydon JE . The prevalence and correlates of fatigue in patients receiving treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy: A comparison

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Sri Harsha Tella, Jaclynn Wessling, Foster Nathan, Shi Qian, Tran Nguyen, Robert McWillimas, Alberts Steven, Minetta Liu, Mitesh Borad, Wen Wee Ma, Mindy Hartgers, Leslie Washburn, Fruth Briant, Martin Fernandezzapico, Tara L Hogenson, Henry Pitot, Zhaohui Jin, and Amit Mahipal

(11%), fatigue (7%), and diarrhea (7%). 9 out of 27 (33%) and 14/27 (52%) had dose reductions secondary to AEs (cytopenias and fatigue) for trifluridine/tipiracil and irinotecan, respectively and 1 patient discontinued the therapy due to adverse events

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Mustafa Özgüroğlu, Ahmet Sezer, Saadettin Kilickap, Mahmut Gümüş, Igor Bondarenko, Miranda Gogishvili, Xuanyao He, Jennifer McGinniss, Giuseppe Gullo, Petra Rietschel, and Ruben GW Quek

statistically significant favorable difference in overall change from baseline in role functioning (8.59; 95% CI, 0.16, 17.01; p=0.0459), emotional functioning (7.27; 95% CI, 1.86, 12.69; p=0.0095), and symptoms of fatigue (-8.19; 95% CI, -15.40, -0.98; p=0

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Alexandra Hunt, Elizabeth Handorf, Vipin Khare, Matthew Blau, Yana Chertock, Carolyn Fang, Michael J. Hall, and Rishi Jain

evaluate the frequency of specific stressors including: practical (e.g. insurance/financial), family (e.g. family health issues), emotional (e.g. nervousness), or physical (e.g. fatigue). Adverse events on trial including hospitalizations, toxicities, or

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Karen Wonders, Rob Wise, and Danielle Ondreka

strength, quality of life, depression, fear fatigue, and pain all improved following the exercise intervention. Conclusion: Exercise is an effective means to manage treatment-related symptoms in cancer and should be a part of the standard of care.