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Jonathan Potack and Steven H. Itzkowitz

1203 patients in Australia who were undergoing CRC screening with FIT. Patients were randomized to either no dietary restrictions or a low peroxidase diet, as required for gFOBT. The rate of completing screening was 12.6% higher in the group with no

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Hema Sundar and Jerald Radich

myalgia that did not improve despite multiple attempts at adverse effect management (diet changes, over-the-counter antidiarrheals, and ibuprofen). The symptoms became significant enough that she often did not take her daily imatinib. Imatinib was

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Dominik J. Ose, Richard Viskochil, Andreana N. Holowatyj, Mikaela Larson, Dalton Wilson, William A. Dunson Jr, Vikrant G. Deshmukh, J. Ryan Butcher, Belinda R. Taylor, Kim Svoboda, Jennifer Leiser, Benjamin Tingey, Benjamin Haaland, David W. Wetter, Simon J. Fisher, Mia Hashibe, and Cornelia M. Ulrich

prospective observational study . Pancreatology 2016 ; 16 : 671 – 676 . 27216012 10.1016/j.pan.2016.04.032 22. Lohmann AE , Ennis M , Taylor SK , . Metabolic factors, anthropometric measures, diet, and physical activity in long-term breast

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Ishveen Chopra, Nilanjana Dwibedi, Malcolm D. Mattes, Xi Tan, Patricia Findley, and Usha Sambamoorthi

be adhering to Life's Simple 7 steps recommended by the American Heart Association: (1) managing blood pressure, (2) controlling cholesterol, (3) controlling blood sugar, (4) being active, (5) eating a healthy diet, (6) maintaining normal weight, and

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Minhhuyen T. Nguyen and David S. Weinberg

FIT cutoff value of 20 mcg/g. 8 Generally, patients prefer FIT to gFOBT because only one stool sample is required and no diet or medication alterations are needed. 7 FIT results can be quantified, which is useful when colonoscopy follow-up capability

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Linda S. Overholser and Carlin Callaway

health behavior counseling could vary based on type of HCP seen, cancer type and stage, and patient characteristics. For example, a 2009 survey of colorectal cancer survivors reported that discussions around health promotion and diet were more likely to

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Lina Jansen, Daniel Boakye, Elizabeth Alwers, Prudence R. Carr, Christoph Reissfelder, Martin Schneider, Uwe M. Martens, Jenny Chang-Claude, Michael Hoffmeister, and Hermann Brenner

derived from 5 lifestyle factors (smoking, alcohol consumption, diet, physical activity, and body mass index), as described previously. 13 The Charlson comorbidity index score 14 (adapted by Deyo et al 15 ) was derived from comorbidities that

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Darren R. Feldman, Wendy L. Schaffer, and Richard M. Steingart

familiar with their increased likelihood of developing cardiovascular disease. Lifestyle changes should be highly encouraged. Patients should be given recommendations for adopting a heart-healthy diet and regular exercise as per the American Heart

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Pelin Cinar, Timothy Kubal, Alison Freifeld, Asmita Mishra, Lawrence Shulman, James Bachman, Rafael Fonseca, Hope Uronis, Dori Klemanski, Kim Slusser, Matthew Lunning, and Catherine Liu

balanced diet, regular activity, and adequate sleep are also important. Consultation with a mental health provider or availability of virtual visits for meditation and crisis intervention teams may also provide some comfort during this challenging time

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Joanne E. Mortimer, Andrea M. Barsevick, Charles L. Bennett, Ann M. Berger, Charles Cleeland, Shannon R. DeVader, Carmen Escalante, Jeffrey Gilreath, Arti Hurria, Tito R. Mendoza, and Hope S. Rugo

can provide information on maintaining a healthy diet and guidance on eating when experiencing lack of taste and during episodes of nausea and vomiting. 21 The impact of dietary intervention was assessed in 111 patients with colorectal cancer