Search Results

You are looking at 51 - 60 of 485 items for :

  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Full access

Crystal S. Denlinger and Andrea M. Barsevick

Edited by Kerrin G. Robinson

functioning of elderly cancer patients prior to diagnosis and following initial treatment . Nurs Res 2001 ; 50 : 222 – 232 . 23 Deimling GT Bowman KF Wagner LJ . The effects of cancer-related pain and fatigue on functioning of older adult, long

Full access

Cindy Railton, Sasha Lupichuk, Jennifer McCormick, Lihong Zhong, Jenny Jaeeun Ko, Barbara Walley, Anil A. Joy, and Janine Giese-Davis

interview (≥55 vs <55 years); (2) residence (urban/nonurban); (3) ET plan (yes/no); current symptoms, including (4) fatigue, (5) hot flashes, and (6) vaginal dryness (yes/no); (7) time since diagnosis (months); and (8) discharge status (cancer center

Full access

Chunkit Fung, Paul C. Dinh Jr, Sophie D. Fossa, and Lois B. Travis

-related complications, including second malignant neoplasms (SMNs), cardiovascular disease (CVD), ototoxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, pulmonary toxicity, hypogonadism, infertility, anxiety, depression, cognitive impairment, and chronic cancer-related fatigue

Full access

Lois Ramondetta

Odors 24 Fatigue 25 , 26 Pain 27 , 28 Constipation 27 Unfortunately, patients with cervical cancer, because of its association with low socioeconomic status, are often without the extensive social and clinical supportive services that are

Full access

Apostolia M. Tsimberidou, Alexandra M. Adamopoulos, Yang Ye, Sarina Piha-Paul, Filip Janku, Siqing Fu, David Hong, Gerald S. Falchook, Aung Naing, Jennifer Wheler, Adoneca Fortier, Razelle Kurzrock, and Kenneth R. Hess

fatigue (n=22), nausea (n=14), anorexia (n=9), and thrombocytopenia (n=7) ( Table 3 ). Grade 3 toxicities were fatigue (n=3), thrombocytopenia (n=1), neutropenia (n=3), hypertension (n=1), and decreased white blood cell count (n=1). Two patients

Full access

Gabrielle B. Rocque, Richard A. Taylor, Aras Acemgil, Xuelin Li, Maria Pisu, Kelly Kenzik, Bradford E. Jackson, Karina I. Halilova, Wendy Demark-Wahnefried, Karen Meneses, Yufeng Li, Michelle Y. Martin, Carol Chambless, Nedra Lisovicz, Mona Fouad, Edward E. Partridge, Elizabeth A. Kvale, and the Patient Care Connect Group

distress at initial assessment were pain (408 of 5,254 cases reporting a cause of distress), balance/mobility difficulties (404 cases), and fatigue (399 cases; Figure 2A ). This breakdown was similar for formal and informal DTs. Patients with distress

Full access

Meagan S. Whisenant, Faith A. Strunk, Debasish Tripathy, and Loretta A. Williams

. Fatigue and distress were described by most women regardless of treatment, whereas arm swelling was reported only by women who had undergone surgery, and skin changes were reported primarily by women who received radiation therapy. Patients volunteered

Full access

Irbaz Bin Riaz, Saad Ullah Malik, Muhammad Husnain, Qurat Ul Ain Riaz Sipra, Warda Faridi, Farva R. Gondal, Thanh Ho, Siddhartha Yadav, Zhen Wang, and Manish Kohli

.90; 95% CI, 0.67–1.19). Use of TKIs was associated with significantly increased risk of drug toxicity. Increased risk of grade 3 or 4 adverse events (RR=5.110; 95% CI, 3.765–6.935), diarrhea (RR=10.725; 95% CI, 4.672–24.622), fatigue (RR=3.310; 95% CI, 1

Full access

Olivia G. Fahey, Elizabeth N. Dow, Jennifer K. Piccolo, and Ticiana A. Leal

pharmacists were gastrointestinal (n=15) and dermatologic (n=6). Endocrine (n=7) and dermatologic (n=7) were the most common grade 1 or 2 irAEs identified by other providers. There were 4 grade 3 irAEs (endocrine, fatigue, liver, and pneumonitis) identified by

Full access

Jorge Cortes, Clara Chen, Michael Mauro, Neela Kumar, Catherine Davis, and Stuart L. Goldberg

baseline fatigue (OR=1.799; P =0.072). Conclusions: Most pts treated with 1L NIL were started on 300 or 400 mg (BID); however, 1 in 4 pts required a dose reduction, most often due to intolerance. Physicians at academic centers were more likely to reduce