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Sarah T. Le, Pritesh S. Karia, Beverley J. Vollenhoven, Robert J. Besaw, Colleen M. Feltmate, and Chrysalyne D. Schmults

space invasion, margin distance, and clitoral involvement. 6 – 14 Due to inconsistent definitions and results across studies, most risk factors have not been adopted into current staging systems. The vulvar cancer staging system in the 8th edition of

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Corbin D. Jacobs, Daniel J. Rocke, Russel R. Kahmke, Hannah Williamson, Gita Suneja, and Yvonne M. Mowery

-defined risk factors (positive margin, lymphovascular invasion, pT3–4, N2–3, extranodal extension, or level IV/V nodal metastasis), and unknown/missing NCCN risk factor data. Log-rank test stratified by RT and Cox regression analyses with respect to OS were

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Therese B. Bevers, Deborah K. Armstrong, Banu Arun, Robert W. Carlson, Kenneth H. Cowan, Mary B. Daly, Irvin Fleming, Judy E. Garber, Mary Gemignani, William J. Gradishar, Helen Krontiras, Swati Kulkarni, Christine Laronga, Loretta Loftus, Deborah J. MacDonald, Martin C. Mahoney, Sofia D. Merajver, Ingrid Meszoely, Lisa Newman, Elizabeth Pritchard, Victoria Seewaldt, Rena V. Sellin, Charles L. Shapiro, and John H. Ward

the United States in 2010. 1 Risk factors for the development of breast cancer can be grouped into categories, including familial/genetic factors (family history, known or suspected BRCA1/2, TP53, PTEN , or other gene mutation associated with breast

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Jeffrey Crawford, Pamela Sue Becker, James O. Armitage, Douglas W. Blayney, Julio Chavez, Peter Curtin, Shira Dinner, Thomas Fynan, Ivana Gojo, Elizabeth A. Griffiths, Shannon Hough, Dwight D. Kloth, David J. Kuter, Gary H. Lyman, Mary Mably, Sudipto Mukherjee, Shiven Patel, Lia E. Perez, Adam Poust, Raajit Rampal, Vivek Roy, Hope S. Rugo, Ayman A. Saad, Lee S. Schwartzberg, Sepideh Shayani, Mahsa Talbott, Saroj Vadhan-Raj, Sumithira Vasu, Martha Wadleigh, Peter Westervelt, Jennifer L. Burns, and Lenora Pluchino

-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) has shown that the rates of myelosuppression and delivered dose intensity are underreported. 4 Due to individual patient risk factors, the rates of myelosuppression with the same or similar regimens varied greatly, making it difficult to

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Anne M. Covey

have a known risk factor, 11 and we believe that implementing screening programs for those known populations improves OS. Other risk factors in the setting of HCV cirrhosis include male sex, coinfection with HIV or HBV, older age, diabetes, and obesity

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Jeffrey Crawford and George M. Rodgers

resistant bacteria, and do not impact the depth and duration of neutropenia, which is the major risk factor for FN. Risk Assessment Per NCCN Guidelines Before the start of chemotherapy, patients should be evaluated for their risk of FN based on

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Peter F. Coccia, Alberto S. Pappo, Lynda Beaupin, Virginia F. Borges, Scott C. Borinstein, Rashmi Chugh, Shira Dinner, Jeanelle Folbrecht, A. Lindsay Frazier, Robert Goldsby, Alexandra Gubin, Robert Hayashi, Mary S. Huang, Michael P. Link, John A. Livingston, Yousif Matloub, Frederick Millard, Kevin C. Oeffinger, Diane Puccetti, Damon Reed, Steven Robinson, Abby R. Rosenberg, Tara Sanft, Holly L. Spraker-Perlman, Margaret von Mehren, Daniel S. Wechsler, Kimberly F. Whelan, Nicholas Yeager, Lisa A. Gurski, and Dorothy A. Shead

adequate evaluation of the efficacy of a given treatment regimen, which in turn can invalidate the results of a clinical trial. Risk factors for nonadherence among AYA patients include patients' emotional functioning (depression and poor/low self

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Michael B. Streiff, Paula L. Bockenstedt, Spero R. Cataland, Carolyn Chesney, Charles Eby, John Fanikos, Annemarie E. Fogerty, Shuwei Gao, Samuel Z. Goldhaber, Hani Hassoun, Paul Hendrie, Bjorn Holmstrom, Nicole Kuderer, Jason T. Lee, Michael M. Millenson, Anne T. Neff, Thomas L. Ortel, Tanya Siddiqi, Judy L. Smith, Gary C. Yee, Anaadriana Zakarija, Nicole McMillian, and Maoko Naganuma

damage, and stasis from direct vascular compression. 6 - 8 The incidence of cancer-associated VTE is further increased by the presence of additional risk factors, such as acquired or congenital thrombophilia (eg, antiphospholipid syndrome, factor V

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Linda S. Overholser and Carlin Callaway

cause of death for adults in the US general population, is now known to be a leading cause of death in individuals treated for cancer. 7 – 12 As with cancer, CVD in survivors could be due to common behavioral risk factors, a family history, a late

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Andrew T. Kuykendall and Rami Komrokji

corresponding risk category being assigned. 2 – 4 Additional risk factors have been proposed but not universally incorporated into risk-stratification models, including cardiovascular risk factors, leukocytosis, and, perhaps most controversially, platelet count