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HSR19-091: Incidence of Adverse Events Following Use of Different PARP Inhibitors: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Thanh Ho, Irbaz Bin Riaz, Maheen Akhter, Saad Ullah Malik, Anum Riaz, Muhammad Zain Farooq, Safi U. Khan, Zhen Wang, M. Hassan Murad, and Andrea Wahner Hendrickson

.2%–55.8%), vomiting (33.7%, 29.5%–38.3%), neutropenia (24.7%, 15.3%–37.4%), headache (23.9%, 19.9%–28.4%), and reduced appetite (21.7%, 19.3%–24.3%). Myeloid neoplasms were rare (1.2%, 0.7%–1.9%). Incidence of grade 3 or higher AE was 44.3% (30.2%–59.5%) and often

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The Role of Myeloid Growth Factors in Acute Leukemia

Martha Wadleigh and Richard M. Stone

) Group . Leukemia 2007 ; 21 : 453 – 461 . 33 Kern W Aul C Maschmeyer G . Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor shortens duration of critical neutropenia and prolongs disease-free survival after sequential high-dose cytosine arabinoside and

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Considerations for Use of Hematopoietic Growth Factors in Patients With Cancer Related to the COVID-19 Pandemic

Elizabeth A. Griffiths, Laura M. Alwan, Kimo Bachiashvili, Anna Brown, Rita Cool, Peter Curtin, Mark B. Geyer, Ivana Gojo, Avyakta Kallam, Wajih Z. Kidwai, Dwight D. Kloth, Eric H. Kraut, Gary H. Lyman, Sudipto Mukherjee, Lia E. Perez, Rachel P. Rosovsky, Vivek Roy, Hope S. Rugo, Sumithira Vasu, Martha Wadleigh, Peter Westervelt, and Pamela S. Becker

resources page ( https://www.nccn.org/covid-19/pdf/HGF_COVID-19.pdf ). 13 We have compiled the following in-depth description of the rationale and evidence supporting our recommendations. Avoidance and Treatment of Neutropenia Febrile neutropenia

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NCCN Guidelines® Insights: Hematopoietic Growth Factors, Version 1.2022

Featured Updates to the NCCN Guidelines

Elizabeth A. Griffiths, Vivek Roy, Laura Alwan, Kimo Bachiashvili, John Baird, Rita Cool, Shira Dinner, Mark Geyer, John Glaspy, Ivana Gojo, Ashley Hicks, Avyakta Kallam, Wajih Zaheer Kidwai, Dwight D. Kloth, Eric H. Kraut, Daniel Landsburg, Gary H. Lyman, Anjlee Mahajan, Ryan Miller, Victoria Nachar, Seema Patel, Shiven Patel, Lia E. Perez, Adam Poust, Fauzia Riaz, Rachel Rosovsky, Hope S. Rugo, Shayna Simon, Sumithira Vasu, Martha Wadleigh, Kelly Westbrook, Peter Westervelt, Ryan A. Berardi, and Lenora Pluchino

(MGFs), such as granulocyte CSFs (G-CSFs), are primarily used to reduce the incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN) in patients with nonmyeloid malignancies receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy and to enable safe delivery of planned dose

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BPI19-019: Avoidable Acute Care Use Associated With Nausea and Vomiting Among Patients Receiving Highly Emetogenic Chemotherapy or Oxaliplatin

Eric J Roeland, Thomas W. LeBlanc, Kathryn J. Ruddy, Ryan Nipp, Rebecca Clark-Snow, Rita Wickham, Gary Binder, William L. Bailey, Ravi Potluri, Luke M. Schmerold, Eros Papademetriou, and Rudolph M. Navari

identified rates of IP/ED ≤30 days post-chemotherapy, and OP-35 toxicities (NV, anemia, dehydration, diarrhea, fever, neutropenia, pain, pneumonia, or sepsis) by ICD-9, ICD-10, procedure codes, and CMS criteria. We evaluated cisplatin, anthracycline

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Myeloid Growth Factors Guidelines

Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah

Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia can cause complications that result in dose reductions or treatment delays that can, in turn, compromise clinical outcomes. Although the prophylactic use of colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) can reduce the risk, severity, and duration of severe and febrile neutropenia, they are not routinely administered to all patients undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy because of the costs. Selective use may, however, enhance their cost-effectiveness. These guidelines discuss the preventative or prophylactic use of recombinant human granulocyte-CSF to reduce the incidence, length, and severity of chemotherapy-related neutropenia and and prevent life-threatening complications.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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Dose Delays, Dose Reductions, and Relative Dose Intensity in Patients With Cancer Who Received Adjuvant or Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Community Oncology Practices

Neelima Denduluri, Debra A. Patt, Yunfei Wang, Menaka Bhor, Xiaoyan Li, Anne M. Favret, Phuong Khanh Morrow, Richard L. Barron, Lina Asmar, Shanmugapriya Saravanan, Yanli Li, Jacob Garcia, and Gary H. Lyman

Background The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) recommend a wide variety of myelosuppressive chemotherapy regimens for the treatment of cancer in adjuvant and neoadjuvant settings. 1 – 7 Neutropenia is one of

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Impact of Recombinant Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor During Neoadjuvant Therapy on Outcomes of Resected Pancreatic Cancer

Pranav Murthy, Mazen S. Zenati, Samer S. AlMasri, Annissa DeSilva, Aatur D. Singhi, Alessandro Paniccia, Kenneth K. Lee, Richard L. Simmons, Nathan Bahary, Michael T. Lotze, and Amer H. Zureikat

Background Neutropenia is a common adverse event associated with chemotherapy. Recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) boosts granulopoiesis and neutrophil maturation 1 , 2 and is approved by the FDA for patients with

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BPI19-015: Reduction of Inappropriate Prophylactic Pegylated Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (pGCSF) Use for Lung Cancer Patients: Five-Year Follow Up of a Quality Improvement (QI) Initiative at the Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute (TCI)

Anne K. Hubben, Nathan Pennell, Marc Shapiro, Craig Savage, and James P. Stevenson

Purpose: National guidelines do not include routine pGCSF as primary prophylaxis (PP) for patients receiving chemotherapy associated with a low risk for febrile neutropenia (FN). Inappropriate pGCSF can increase patient morbidity, financial burden

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CLO19-035: Safety Profile and Adverse Events of Sunitinib as a First-Line Treatment for Advanced/Metastatic Clear-Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma: Pooled Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

Tarek Haykal, Babikir Kheiri, Varun Samji, Yazan Zayed, Ragheed Al-Dulaimi, Inderdeep Gakhal, Areeg Bala, Jason Sotzen, Ahmed Abdalla, and Ghassan Bachuwa

lipase, 6%; neutropenia, 6%; thrombocytopenia, 6%; hypophosphatemia, 5%; lymphocytopenia, 5%; anemia, 4%; and leukopenia, 3%. Conclusion: Despite s unitinib being one of the current standard treatments for patients with metastatic/advanced clear