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HSR19-091: Incidence of Adverse Events Following Use of Different PARP Inhibitors: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Thanh Ho, Irbaz Bin Riaz, Maheen Akhter, Saad Ullah Malik, Anum Riaz, Muhammad Zain Farooq, Safi U. Khan, Zhen Wang, M. Hassan Murad, and Andrea Wahner Hendrickson

). Of 1,685 patients who received PARPi, incidence of any AE, regardless of grade, was 98.5% (95% CI, 97.2–99.2%). Common AEs were: nausea (incidence rate, 68.9% and 95% CI, 58.7%–77.5%), fatigue (56.3%, 45.3%–66.8%), anemia (46.3%, 37

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Phase I Clinical Trial of Bendamustine and Bevacizumab for Patients With Advanced Cancer

Apostolia M. Tsimberidou, Alexandra M. Adamopoulos, Yang Ye, Sarina Piha-Paul, Filip Janku, Siqing Fu, David Hong, Gerald S. Falchook, Aung Naing, Jennifer Wheler, Adoneca Fortier, Razelle Kurzrock, and Kenneth R. Hess

defined in the most current version of the NCI’s Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI CTCAE 4.0), 12 even if expected and believed to be related to the study medications (except nausea and vomiting, electrolyte imbalances responsive to

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Quality of Life Is Associated With Survival in Patients With Gastric Cancer: Results From the Randomized CRITICS Trial

Romy M. van Amelsfoort, Iris Walraven, Jacobien Kieffer, Edwin P.M. Jansen, Annemieke Cats, Nicole C.T. van Grieken, Elma Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, Hein Putter, Johanna W. van Sandick, Karolina Sikorska, Cornelis J.H. van de Velde, Neil K. Aaronson, Marcel Verheij, and on behalf of the CRITICS Investigators

functioning, role functioning, cognitive functioning, emotional functioning, and social functioning), 3 multi-item symptom scales (fatigue, nausea and vomiting, and pain), 6 single-item symptom scales (dyspnea, insomnia, appetite loss, constipation, diarrhea

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Antiemesis Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology

Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (emesis) can significantly affect a patient's quality of life, leading to poor adherence with further chemotherapy treatment. In addition, nausea and vomiting can result in metabolic imbalances, degeneration of self-care and functional ability, nutrient depletion, anorexia, decline of the patient's performance status and mental status, wound dehiscence, esophageal tears, and withdrawal from potentially useful or curative anticancer treatment. The incidence and severity of nausea and/or vomiting in patients receiving chemotherapy are affected by numerous factors, including (1) the specific chemotherapeutic agents used, (2) dosage, (3) the schedule and route of administration, and (4) individual patient variability. Approximately 70% to 80% of all cancer patients receiving chemotherapy experience emesis, and 10% to 44% experience anticipatory emesis.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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NCCN Task Force Report: Prevention and Management of Mucositis in Cancer Care

William Bensinger, Mark Schubert, Kie-Kian Ang, David Brizel, Elizabeth Brown, June G. Eilers, Linda Elting, Bharat B. Mittal, Mark A. Schattner, Ricardo Spielberger, Nathaniel S. Treister, and Andy M. Trotti III

Impact of Oral Mucositis Until recently, cancer therapy–related nausea, vomiting, and neutropenia were considered the most common complications of cancer therapy, and a variety of new treatment options have emerged over the past several decades

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Benefit of Cisplatin With Definitive Radiotherapy in Older Women With Cervical Cancer

Michael Xiang and Elizabeth A. Kidd

) (aHR, 1.04; P =.78) or genitourinary (cystitis/dysuria) toxicity (aHR, 1.13; P =.48). However, cisplatin was associated with increased hematologic (cytopenia) toxicity (aHR, 2.71; 95% CI, 1.81–4.08; P <.0001), nausea/vomiting (aHR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1

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A Population-Based Study of Morbidity After Pancreatic Cancer Diagnosis

Reith R. Sarkar, Katherine E. Fero, Daniel M. Seible, Neil Panjwani, Rayna K. Matsuno, and James D. Murphy

itself (eg, pancreatitis), and radiation toxicity. Hospitalizations for nonlocal/distant disease included those due to thromboembolic events, cytopenia, dehydration, nausea or vomiting, malnutrition and cachexia, ascites, pathologic fracture, and

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Cancer-Related Fatigue

Ann M. Berger, Amy Pickar Abernethy, Ashley Atkinson, Andrea M. Barsevick, William S. Breitbart, David Cella, Bernadine Cimprich, Charles Cleeland, Mario A. Eisenberger, Carmen P. Escalante, Paul B. Jacobsen, Phyllis Kaldor, Jennifer A. Ligibel, Barbara A. Murphy, Tracey O'Connor, William F. Pirl, Eve Rodler, Hope S. Rugo, Jay Thomas, and Lynne I. Wagner

distressing symptom associated with cancer and its treatment, more distressing even than pain or nausea and vomiting, which, for most patients, can generally be managed with medications. 24 , 25 Fatigue in patients with cancer has been underreported

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Cancer-Related Fatigue

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Fatigue is a common symptom in patients with cancer and is nearly universal in those undergoing cytotoxic chemotherapy, radiation therapy, bone marrow transplantation, or treatment with biologic response modifiers. The problem, which affects 70% to 100% of cancer patients, has been exacerbated by the increased use of fatigue-inducing multimodal treatments and dose-dense, dose-intense protocols. In patients with metastatic disease, the prevalence of cancer-related fatigue exceeds 75%, and cancer survivors report that fatigue is a disruptive symptom months or even years after treatment ends. Patients perceive fatigue to be the most distressing symptom associated with cancer and its treatment, more distressing even than pain or nausea and vomiting, which, for most patients, can generally be managed with medications.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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BPI20-016: Comparative Study Between the Clinical Effect of Palonosetron and Granisetron as Antiemetic Therapy for Patients Receiving Highly Emetogenic Chemotherapy Regimens

Mohamed Ahmed Mahrous, Gamal Abd El Khalek El- Azab, and Hisham Ahmed Tawfik

Background: Chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is considered the main fear for both oncologists and patients. It affects quality of life dramatically, especially the food intake and nutritional status. This can be clearly observed in