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Shilpa Grover and Sapna Syngal

comparable sensitivities to the revised Bethesda criteria. They can also provide quantitative risk assessment and streamline genetic testing by identifying the family member with the highest probability of being a mutation carrier. But before prediction

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Jennifer M. Weiss, Samir Gupta, Carol A. Burke, Lisen Axell, Lee-May Chen, Daniel C. Chung, Katherine M. Clayback, Susan Dallas, Seth Felder, Olumide Gbolahan, Francis M. Giardiello, William Grady, Michael J. Hall, Heather Hampel, Rachel Hodan, Gregory Idos, Priyanka Kanth, Bryson Katona, Laura Lamps, Xavier Llor, Patrick M. Lynch, Arnold J. Markowitz, Sara Pirzadeh-Miller, Niloy Jewel Samadder, David Shibata, Benjamin J. Swanson, Brittany M. Szymaniak, Georgia L. Wiesner, Andrew Wolf, Matthew B. Yurgelun, Mae Zakhour, Susan D. Darlow, Mary A. Dwyer, and Mallory Campbell

this activity, participants will be able to: Integrate into professional practice the updates to the NCCN Guidelines for Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Colorectal Describe the rationale behind the decision-making process for developing the

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Samir Gupta, Dawn Provenzale, Xavier Llor, Amy L. Halverson, William Grady, Daniel C. Chung, Sigurdis Haraldsdottir, Arnold J. Markowitz, Thomas P. Slavin Jr, Heather Hampel, CGC, Reid M. Ness, Jennifer M. Weiss, Dennis J. Ahnen, Lee-may Chen, Gregory Cooper, Dayna S. Early, Francis M. Giardiello, Michael J. Hall, Stanley R. Hamilton, Priyanka Kanth, Jason B. Klapman, Audrey J. Lazenby, Patrick M. Lynch, Robert J. Mayer, June Mikkelson, CGC, Shajan Peter, Scott E. Regenbogen, Mary A. Dwyer, CGC, and Ndiya Ogba

will be able to: Integrate into professional practice the updates to the NCCN Guidelines for Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Colorectal Describe the rationale behind the decision-making process for developing the NCCN Guidelines for Genetic

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Mary B. Daly, Robert Pilarski, Matthew B. Yurgelun, Michael P. Berry, Saundra S. Buys, Patricia Dickson, Susan M. Domchek, Ahmed Elkhanany, Susan Friedman, Judy E. Garber, Michael Goggins, Mollie L. Hutton, Seema Khan, Catherine Klein, Wendy Kohlmann, Allison W. Kurian, Christine Laronga, Jennifer K. Litton, Julie S. Mak, Carolyn S. Menendez, Sofia D. Merajver, Barbara S. Norquist, Kenneth Offit, Tuya Pal, Holly J. Pederson, Gwen Reiser, Kristen Mahoney Shannon, Kala Visvanathan, Jeffrey N. Weitzel, Myra J. Wick, Kari B. Wisinski, Mary A. Dwyer, and Susan D. Darlow

able to: Integrate into professional practice the updates to the NCCN Guidelines for Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Breast, Ovarian, and Pancreatic Describe the rationale behind the decision-making process for developing the NCCN Guidelines for

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Sofia D. Merajver and Kara Milliron

Breast cancer, a complex and heterogeneous disease, is the most common malignancy diagnosed in women in the United States, with over 180,000 new cases and approximately 44,000 deaths per year. Breast cancer risk is influenced by a large number of factors, including age, family history, reproductive and hormonal history, proliferative breast conditions, physical activity, diet, and environmental exposures. These factors all interact in a complex manner to contribute to the risk of developing breast cancer. Because the interactions between risk factors are poorly understood at the molecular level, it is difficult to accurately evaluate the breast cancer risk of a given person presenting with an individual constellation of factors. To better define the population at increased risk that may warrant specific intervention, several models exist to estimate a woman's risk for developing breast cancer and for harboring a germline mutation in a cancer susceptibility gene. This article summarizes these models and gives brief guidelines about which model may be preferable given a specific family history.

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Mary B. Daly, Tuya Pal, Michael P. Berry, Saundra S. Buys, Patricia Dickson, Susan M. Domchek, Ahmed Elkhanany, Susan Friedman, Michael Goggins, Mollie L. Hutton, CGC, Beth Y. Karlan, Seema Khan, Catherine Klein, Wendy Kohlmann, CGC, Allison W. Kurian, Christine Laronga, Jennifer K. Litton, Julie S. Mak, LCGC, Carolyn S. Menendez, Sofia D. Merajver, Barbara S. Norquist, Kenneth Offit, Holly J. Pederson, Gwen Reiser, CGC, Leigha Senter-Jamieson, CGC, Kristen Mahoney Shannon, Rebecca Shatsky, Kala Visvanathan, Jeffrey N. Weitzel, Myra J. Wick, Kari B. Wisinski, Matthew B. Yurgelun, Susan D. Darlow, and Mary A. Dwyer

gender and age of the individual. Before 2020, the NCCN Guidelines for Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Breast and Ovarian (Breast, Ovarian, and Pancreatic as of 2020) focused largely on testing criteria for BRCA1/2 and appropriate risk management

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Jerome Kim and Arti Hurria

Adults With Cancer The Chemotherapy Risk Assessment Scale for High-Age Patients The Chemotherapy Risk Assessment Scale for High-Age Patients (CRASH) toxicity tool ( Table 3 , Figure 2 ) 7 was formulated in a study evaluating 518 patients

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Arvind Bambhroliya, Mariana Chavez-MacGregor, and Abenaa M. Brewster

-risk consultations (85%) were conducted by primary care providers (PCPs). The study that reported the highest uptake rate of 54.4% evaluated acceptance of risk reduction medications at a breast surveillance clinic that provided comprehensive risk assessment and

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Heather Hampel

MUTYH -associated polyposis. These conditions are much rarer than Lynch syndrome. Screening by Clinical Criteria In the 2014 NCCN Guidelines for Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Colorectal, testing for Lynch syndrome is separated into 2

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Doralina L. Anghelescu, Jennifer Harman Ehrentraut, and Lane G. Faughnan

, including abuse, misuse, and dependence; addiction; and pseudoaddiction. Risk Assessment at Initiation of Opioid Therapy The risk of opioid misuse and/or abuse increases with the introduction of opioid therapy; however, opioid therapy often is