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Survivorship: Fatigue, Version 1.2014

Crystal S. Denlinger, Jennifer A. Ligibel, Madhuri Are, K. Scott Baker, Wendy Demark-Wahnefried, Debra L. Friedman, Mindy Goldman, Lee Jones, Allison King, Grace H. Ku, Elizabeth Kvale, Terry S. Langbaum, Kristin Leonardi-Warren, Mary S. McCabe, Michelle Melisko, Jose G. Montoya, Kathi Mooney, Mary Ann Morgan, Javid J. Moslehi, Tracey O’Connor, Linda Overholser, Electra D. Paskett, Muhammad Raza, Karen L. Syrjala, Susan G. Urba, Mark T. Wakabayashi, Phyllis Zee, Nicole McMillian, and Deborah Freedman-Cass

-related fatigue as “a distressing, persistent, subjective sense of physical, emotional, and/or cognitive tiredness or exhaustion related to cancer or cancer treatment that is not proportional to recent activity and interferes with usual functioning.” 1 Fatigue is

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Effect of Yoga and Mediational Influence of Fatigue on Walking, Physical Activity, and Quality of Life Among Cancer Survivors

Po-Ju Lin, Brian J. Altman, Nikesha J. Gilmore, Kah Poh Loh, Richard F. Dunne, Javier Bautista, Chunkit Fung, Michelle C. Janelsins, Luke J. Peppone, Marianne K. Melnik, Kim O. Gococo, Michael J. Messino, and Karen M. Mustian

(QoL) is often dramatically diminished due to cancer-related and treatment-related toxicities. 3 – 6 Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is one of the most pervasive toxicities experienced by survivors. 5 , 7 – 11 Although most patients experience CRF

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A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Panax Ginseng for Cancer-Related Fatigue in Patients With Advanced Cancer

Sriram Yennurajalingam, Nizar M. Tannir, Janet L. Williams, Zhanni Lu, Kenneth R. Hess, Susan Frisbee-Hume, Helen L. House, Zita Dubauskas Lim, Kyu-Hyoung Lim, Gabriel Lopez, Akhila Reddy, Ahsan Azhar, Angelique Wong, Sunil M. Patel, Deborah A. Kuban, Ahmed Omar Kaseb, Lorenzo Cohen, and Eduardo Bruera

Background Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is the most common symptom in patients with cancer. 1 , 2 Despite the high frequency, severity, and effects of CRF on quality of life (QoL), limited treatment options are available. 1 , 3 Prior

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Uptake of Recommendations for Posttreatment Cancer-Related Fatigue Among Breast Cancer Survivors

Antonio Di Meglio, Cecile Charles, Elise Martin, Julie Havas, Arnauld Gbenou, Jean-Daniel Flaysakier, Anne-Laure Martin, Sibille Everhard, Enora Laas, Nicolas Chopin, Laurence Vanlemmens, Christelle Jouannaud, Christelle Levy, Olivier Rigal, Marion Fournier, Patrick Soulie, Florian Scotte, Barbara Pistilli, Agnes Dumas, Gwenn Menvielle, Fabrice André, Stefan Michiels, Sarah Dauchy, and Ines Vaz-Luis

these, cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is extremely common and persistent. 5 – 8 Compared with fatigue experienced by individuals without cancer, CRF is described as more intense, distressing, and less responsive to rest. 9 – 11 Its manifestations can

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Uptake of Recommendations for Posttreatment Cancer-Related Fatigue Among Breast Cancer Survivors

Antonio Di Meglio, Cecile Charles, Elise Martin, Julie Havas, Arnauld Gbenou, Jean-Daniel Flaysakier, Anne-Laure Martin, Sibille Everhard, Enora Laas, Nicolas Chopin, Laurence Vanlemmens, Christelle Jouannaud, Christelle Levy, Olivier Rigal, Marion Fournier, Patrick Soulie, Florian Scotte, Barbara Pistilli, Agnes Dumas, Gwenn Menvielle, Fabrice André, Stefan Michiels, Sarah Dauchy, and Ines Vaz-Luis

these, cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is extremely common and persistent. 5 – 8 Compared with fatigue experienced by individuals without cancer, CRF is described as more intense, distressing, and less responsive to rest. 9 – 11 Its manifestations can

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Cancer-Related Fatigue: Definitions and Clinical Subtypes

Barbara F. Piper and David Cella

I ncreasing attention is being given to exploring whether fatigue in patients with cancer experiencing similar symptoms can be classified or grouped into specific clinically significant subtypes. Various methods have been used to classify these

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Implementing the Fatigue Guidelines at One NCCN Member Institution: Process and Outcomes

Tami Borneman, Barbara F. Piper, Virginia Chih-Yi Sun, Marianna Koczywas, Gwen Uman, and Betty Ferrell

-Related Fatigue Clinical Practice Guidelines, version 3 . 2007 . Available at : www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/PDF/fatigue.pdf . Accessed December 5, 2006 . 2. NIH State-of-the-Science Statement on symptom management in cancer: pain

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Computer/Online-Mediated Social Support for Cancer-Related Fatigue

Nina Wagner-Johnston

Treatment for Cancer-Related Fatigue Overview The NCCN Cancer-Related Fatigue Panel defines the condition as “a distressing, persistent, subjective sense of tiredness or exhaustion related to cancer or cancer treatment that is not

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Cancer-Related Fatigue

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Fatigue is a common symptom in patients with cancer and is nearly universal in those undergoing cytotoxic chemotherapy, radiation therapy, bone marrow transplantation, or treatment with biologic response modifiers. The problem, which affects 70% to 100% of cancer patients, has been exacerbated by the increased use of fatigue-inducing multimodal treatments and dose-dense, dose-intense protocols. In patients with metastatic disease, the prevalence of cancer-related fatigue exceeds 75%, and cancer survivors report that fatigue is a disruptive symptom months or even years after treatment ends. Patients perceive fatigue to be the most distressing symptom associated with cancer and its treatment, more distressing even than pain or nausea and vomiting, which, for most patients, can generally be managed with medications.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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QIM19-145: Overcoming a Barrier to Exercise With the James Exercise Program Quality Initiative With Surgical Oncology Nursing

Cari Utendorf, Tiffany Stump, Sara Wolfe, Lynne Brophy, Jennie Gerardi, and Karen Hock

for cancer survivors, only 20%–30% of them will be active after cancer treatment (Rock et al, CA Cancer J Clin 2012). The known barriers to exercise in oncology are lack of patient education, lack of knowledge, fatigue, decreased motivation, and