Search Results

You are looking at 111 - 120 of 782 items for :

  • "metastases" x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Full access

Fei Gao, Nan Li, YongMei Xu, and GuoWang Yang

-related mortality and can have a harmful effect on these patients, and was associated with a significant decrease in survival. For patients with <6 positive lymph node metastases who did not receive POCT, however, RT can improve survival time, and for patients with

Full access

Vinayak Muralidhar, Paul L. Nguyen, Brandon A. Mahal, David D. Yang, Kent W. Mouw, Brent S. Rose, Clair J. Beard, Jason A. Efstathiou, Neil E. Martin, Martin T. King, and Peter F. Orio III

), and presence of distant metastases (M0 vs M1). Presence of nodal or distant metastases is recorded in the NCDB before treatment based on coding from patient medical records. The PSA cutoff of ≥98.0 ng/mL was chosen due to limitations in the NCDB: all

Full access

Matthew D. Galsky, Harry W. Herr, and Dean F. Bajorin

Despite surgery with curative intent, approximately 50% of patients with muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder will develop distant metastases and succumb to their disease. Attempts to improve outcomes have focused on refining surgical techniques and integrating perioperative chemotherapy. This review summarizes the available literature addressing the role of pelvic lymphadenectomy, neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and adjuvant chemotherapy in the management of patients with muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of bladder.

Full access

Jason Hu, Armen G. Aprikian, Marie Vanhuyse, and Alice Dragomir

-month period before ADT initiation. 37 Metastatic status was also defined from the 18-month period before ADT initiation as the presence of an ICD code related to metastases or use of a metastatic castration-resistant PCa drug (ICD-9 was used for the

Full access

In the year 2005, an estimated 18,500 new cases of primary brain and nervous system neoplasms will be diagnosed in the United States. These tumors will be responsible for approximately 12,760 deaths. The incidence of primary malignant brain tumors has been increasing over the past 25 years, especially in elderly persons (rates are increasing at about 1.2% each year). Metastatic disease to the central nervous system (CNS) occurs much more frequently, with an incidence about 10 times that of primary brain tumors. It is estimated between 20% and 40% of patients with systemic cancer will develop brain metastases.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

Full access

Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounts for 15% to 25% of all lung cancers. About 98% of SCLC is attributed to cigarette smoking, whereas the remaining cases are presumably caused by environmental or genetic factors. In 2003, an estimated 34,000 new cases of SCLC will have been diagnosed in the United States. SCLC is distinguished from non-small cell lung cancer by its rapid doubling time, high growth fraction, and early development of widespread metastases.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

Full access

The UNMC Eppley Cancer Center at The Nebraska Medical Center

An estimated 38,890 Americans will be diagnosed with kidney cancer and 12,840 will die of this disease in the United States in 2006. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) constitutes approximately 2% of all malignancies, with a median age at diagnosis of 65 years. Smoking and obesity are among the risk factors for RCC development, and tumor grade, local extent of the tumor, presence of regional nodal metastases, and evidence of metastatic disease at presentation are the most important prognostic determinants of 5-year survival. These guidelines discuss evaluation, staging, treatment, and management after treatment.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

Full access

Grant A. McArthur

Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is a low-grade malignancy of the skin and subcutaneous tissues that only rarely forms distant metastases. More than 90% of cases are associated with a chromosomal translocation involving the COL1A1 gene on chromosome 17 and the platelet-derived growth factor B gene on chromosome 22. Management of this disease is primarily surgical with excellent rates of local control obtained using either wide local excision or Mohs micrographic surgery. Data have recently shown that inhibiting platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGFR) with imatinib can induce high rates of clinical response in patients with unresectable or metastatic DFSP. These data have led to approval of imatinib by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating uresectable DFSP. Although wide surgical excision remains standard care, patients with locally advanced disease not suitable for surgical excision can be treated with the PDGFR-inhibitor imatinib, which sometimes allows residual DFSP to be surgically excised.

Full access

In 2005, approximately 26,000 new cases of small cell lung cancer were diagnosed in the United States. When compared with non-small cell lung cancer, SCLC generally has a more rapid doubling time, a higher growth fraction, and earlier development of widespread metastases. SCLC is highly sensitive to initial chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Treatment with chemotherapy plus chest radiotherapy can be curative for some patients with limited-stage SCLC, whereas most patients with extensive-stage disease who undergo chemotherapy alone experience palliated symptoms and prolonged survival. The updated 2006 NCCN guidelines include new principles of surgical resection as well as chemotherapy and radiation dosage changes.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

Full access

UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounts for 15% of lung cancers. Nearly all cases of SCLC are attributable to cigarette smoking, and the remaining cases are presumably caused by environmental or genetic factors. Compared with non-small cell lung cancer, SCLC generally has a more rapid doubling time, a higher growth fraction, and earlier development of widespread metastases. SCLC is highly sensitive to initial chemotherapy and radiotherapy, but most patients eventually die from recurrent disease. These guidelines detail the management of SCLC from initial diagnosis and staging through treatment, and include information on supportive and palliative care. Important updates to the 2008 version include refined categories for performance status and the addition of topotecan as an option for patients who experience relapse.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org