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CLO24-083: Efficacy of Selinexor in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Junaid Anwar, Muhammad Haseeb, Anusha Baddam, Salma Saidahmed, Binayak Singh, Roshan, Zahoor Ahmed, Ahmed Abdelhakeem, Kachhadia Meet, Raza Zarrar, and Tahir Naqvi

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QIM24-183: Novel Therapies in the Oncology Care Model: A Profile in Review.

Puneeth Indurlal and Lalan S. Wilfong

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Mesothelioma: Pleural, Version 1.2024

Featured Updates to the NCCN Guidelines

James Stevenson, David S. Ettinger, Douglas E. Wood, Dara L. Aisner, Wallace Akerley, Jessica R. Bauman, Ankit Bharat, Debora S. Bruno, Joe Y. Chang, Lucian R. Chirieac, Malcolm DeCamp, Aakash Desai, Thomas J. Dilling, Jonathan Dowell, Gregory A. Durm, Marina C. Garassino, Scott Gettinger, Travis E. Grotz, Matthew A. Gubens, Rudy P. Lackner, Michael Lanuti, Jules Lin, Billy W. Loo Jr, Christine M. Lovly, Fabien Maldonado, Erminia Massarelli, Daniel Morgensztern, Trey C. Mullikin, Thomas Ng, Gregory A. Otterson, Dawn Owen, Sandip P. Patel, Tejas Patil, Patricio M. Polanco, Gregory J. Riely, Jonathan Riess, Theresa A. Shapiro, Aditi P. Singh, Alda Tam, Tawee Tanvetyanon, Jane Yanagawa, Stephen C. Yang, Edwin Yau, Kristina Gregory, and Lisa Hang

. To participate in this journal CE activity: (1) review the educational content; (2) take the posttest with a 66% minimum passing score and complete the evaluation at https://education.nccn.org/node/94831 ; and (3) view/print certificate

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Depression and Pancreatic Cancer

Andrew D. Boyd and Michelle Riba

Dr. Boyd has no financial disclosures; Dr. Riba has served as a consultant for Pfizer, Eli Lilly, and GlaxoSmithKline. References 1. Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) . Search Cancer Statistics Review, 1975

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BPI22-011: Accreditation Systems Reduce Time to Treatment Delays; Three-Year Review of a South African Internationally Accredited Site

Carol-Ann Benn

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QIM21-095: Barriers to Timely Referral of Patients with Terminal Cancer to Hospice Care: A Retrospective Review

Hassaan Yasin, Kemnasom Nwanwene, Mahmoud Abdallah, Todd Gress, and Maria Tria Tirona

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HSR19-091: Incidence of Adverse Events Following Use of Different PARP Inhibitors: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Thanh Ho, Irbaz Bin Riaz, Maheen Akhter, Saad Ullah Malik, Anum Riaz, Muhammad Zain Farooq, Safi U. Khan, Zhen Wang, M. Hassan Murad, and Andrea Wahner Hendrickson

Background: Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are a highly conserved family of enzymes whose main function is to preserve genomic integrity following DNA damage. PARP inhibitors (PARPi) are increasingly used in cancers with deficiencies in homologous recombination. Clinical trials in breast and ovarian cancers have led to several FDA approvals in recent years, and their use in clinical practice is continuing to rise. It is thus necessary to assess their adverse event (AE) profile. Method: Literature search was performed using Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and Scopus (inception through October 26, 2018). Eligible studies were phase 3, randomized, controlled trials that compared single agent PARPi to placebo or standard treatment. Number of patients treated and AEs reported were recorded. Observed incidence of AE was reported with 95% CI. Heterogeneity was evaluated using Cochran Q statistic and I2 statistics quantified the proportion of heterogeneity not due to chance. Results: Databases revealed 869 references. Of these, 6 were eligible: 2 in breast cancer (OlympiAD, EMBRACA) and 4 in ovarian cancer (NOVA, ARIEL3, SOLO1, SOLO2). PARPi included niraparib (NOVA), olaparib (OlympiAD, SOLO1, SOLO2), rucaparib (ARIEL3), and talazoparib (EMBRACA). Of 1,685 patients who received PARPi, incidence of any AE, regardless of grade, was 98.5% (95% CI, 97.2–99.2%). Common AEs were: nausea (incidence rate, 68.9% and 95% CI, 58.7%–77.5%), fatigue (56.3%, 45.3%–66.8%), anemia (46.3%, 37.2%–55.8%), vomiting (33.7%, 29.5%–38.3%), neutropenia (24.7%, 15.3%–37.4%), headache (23.9%, 19.9%–28.4%), and reduced appetite (21.7%, 19.3%–24.3%). Myeloid neoplasms were rare (1.2%, 0.7%–1.9%). Incidence of grade 3 or higher AE was 44.3% (30.2%–59.5%) and often related to myelosuppression, specifically anemia (24.7%, 15.3%–37.4%), neutropenia (10.7%, 6.6%–16.9%), and thrombocytopenia (5.0%, 1.7%–14.0%). Incidence of serious AE was 24.3% (19.4%–29.9%); dose interruption occurred in 53.3% (41.2%–65.0%) and dose reduction occurred in 39.2% (23.6%–57.4%). 10% (7.4%–13.6%) of patients discontinued therapy due to AE. Death due to AE was rare; less than 1% (0.4%, 0.2%–0.8%) in all trials. Conclusion: Myelosuppression and gastrointestinal toxicities were the most commonly reported AE in 6 randomized phase 3 trials of PARPi for breast and ovarian cancers. Therapy was rarely discontinued due to AE. It remains to be seen whether these results will be reflected in clinical practice.

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Surgery for Early-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

Bryan J. Schneider, Ashish Saxena, and Robert J. Downey

small single-arm phase II studies to evaluate the potential clinical benefit of induction chemotherapy followed by surgical resection. In addition, several retrospective reviews of institutional data, and analyses of national cancer databases, together

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NCCN Biosimilars White Paper: Regulatory, Scientific, and Patient Safety Perspectives

Andrew D. Zelenetz, Islah Ahmed, Edward Louis Braud, James D. Cross, Nancy Davenport-Ennis, Barry D. Dickinson, Steven E. Goldberg, Scott Gottlieb, Philip E. Johnson, Gary H. Lyman, Richard Markus, Ursula A. Matulonis, Denise Reinke, Edward C. Li, Jessica DeMartino, Jonathan K. Larsen, and James M. Hoffman

recommended list of USAN stems is updated regularly to accommodate drugs with new chemical and pharmacologic properties. After initial review by USANC staff, the USANC recommends and the sponsor accepts a name after the balloting process is complete. When

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The Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection (PRECEDE) Study is a Global Effort to Drive Early Detection: Baseline Imaging Findings in High-Risk Individuals

George Zogopoulos, Ido Haimi, Shenin A. Sanoba, Jessica N. Everett, Yifan Wang, Bryson W. Katona, James J. Farrell, Aaron J. Grossberg, Salvatore Paiella, Kelsey A. Klute, Yan Bi, Michael B. Wallace, Richard S. Kwon, Elena M. Stoffel, Raymond C. Wadlow, Daniel A. Sussman, Nipun B. Merchant, Jennifer B. Permuth, Talia Golan, Maria Raitses-Gurevich, Andrew M. Lowy, Joy Liau, Joanne M. Jeter, James M. Lindberg, Daniel C. Chung, Julie Earl, Teresa A. Brentnall, Kasmintan A. Schrader, Vivek Kaul, Chenchan Huang, Hersh Chandarana, Caroline Smerdon, John J. Graff, Fay Kastrinos, Sonia S. Kupfer, Aimee L. Lucas, Rosalie C. Sears, Randall E. Brand, Giovanni Parmigiani, Diane M. Simeone, and on behalf of the PRECEDE Consortium

in the Supplemental Methods . Figure 1. Timeline of PRECEDE Consortium milestones. Abbreviations: DCC, data coordinating center; EUS, endoscopic ultrasound; IRB, Institutional Review Board; PRECEDE, Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection