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18% were referred to genetic counseling. Results are presented in Table 1 . Conclusions: The Athena model effectively identifies women previously unaware of their elevated breast cancer risk status. The findings support the value and efficiency of

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William J. Gradishar, Benjamin O. Anderson, Ron Balassanian, Sarah L. Blair, Harold J. Burstein, Amy Cyr, Anthony D. Elias, William B. Farrar, Andres Forero, Sharon Hermes Giordano, Matthew Goetz, Lori J. Goldstein, Clifford A. Hudis, Steven J. Isakoff, P. Kelly Marcom, Ingrid A. Mayer, Beryl McCormick, Meena Moran, Sameer A. Patel, Lori J. Pierce, Elizabeth C. Reed, Kilian E. Salerno, Lee S. Schwartzberg, Karen Lisa Smith, Mary Lou Smith, Hatem Soliman, George Somlo, Melinda Telli, John H. Ward, Dorothy A. Shead, and Rashmi Kumar

reporting the pathologic analysis of all breast cancer specimens. Genetic Counseling: Genetic counselling is recommended for patients considered to be at high risk for hereditary breast cancer as defined by the NCCN Guidelines for Genetic/Familial High

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William J. Gradishar, Benjamin O. Anderson, Ron Balassanian, Sarah L. Blair, Harold J. Burstein, Amy Cyr, Anthony D. Elias, William B. Farrar, Andres Forero, Sharon Hermes Giordano, Matthew Goetz, Lori J. Goldstein, Clifford A. Hudis, Steven J. Isakoff, P. Kelly Marcom, Ingrid A. Mayer, Beryl McCormick, Meena Moran, Sameer A. Patel, Lori J. Pierce, Elizabeth C. Reed, Kilian E. Salerno, Lee S. Schwartzberg, Karen Lisa Smith, Mary Lou Smith, Hatem Soliman, George Somlo, Melinda Telli, John H. Ward, Dorothy A. Shead, and Rashmi Kumar

.cap.org ). The NCCN Breast Cancer Panel endorses the use of the CAP protocols for reporting the pathologic analysis of all breast cancer specimens. Genetic Counseling For patients considered to be at high risk for hereditary breast cancer as defined by

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Therese B. Bevers, Benjamin O. Anderson, Ermelinda Bonaccio, Sandra Buys, Mary B. Daly, Peter J. Dempsey, William B. Farrar, Irving Fleming, Judy E. Garber, Randall E. Harris, Alexandra S. Heerdt, Mark Helvie, John G. Huff, Nazanin Khakpour, Seema A. Khan, Helen Krontiras, Gary Lyman, Elizabeth Rafferty, Sara Shaw, Mary Lou Smith, Theodore N. Tsangaris, Cheryl Williams, and Thomas Yankeelov

In the statement on Genetic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility updated in 2003, ASCO recommended women undergo genetic counseling/testing when 1) a personal or family history suggests genetic cancer susceptibility, 2) the test can be adequately

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Wui-Jin Koh, Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum, Sarah Bean, Kristin Bradley, Susana M. Campos, Kathleen R. Cho, Hye Sook Chon, Christina Chu, David Cohn, Marta Ann Crispens, Shari Damast, Oliver Dorigo, Patricia J. Eifel, Christine M. Fisher, Peter Frederick, David K. Gaffney, Suzanne George, Ernest Han, Susan Higgins, Warner K. Huh, John R. Lurain III, Andrea Mariani, David Mutch, Christa Nagel, Larissa Nekhlyudov, Amanda Nickles Fader, Steven W. Remmenga, R. Kevin Reynolds, Todd Tillmanns, Stefanie Ueda, Emily Wyse, Catheryn M. Yashar, Nicole R. McMillian, and Jillian L. Scavone

promoter methylation to assess for an epigenetic process rather than a germline mutation. 16 Genetic counseling and testing is recommended for patients with all other MMR abnormalities and for patients without MMR defects but who have a significant family

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William J. Gradishar, Meena S. Moran, Jame Abraham, Rebecca Aft, Doreen Agnese, Kimberly H. Allison, Bethany Anderson, Harold J. Burstein, Helen Chew, Chau Dang, Anthony D. Elias, Sharon H. Giordano, Matthew P. Goetz, Lori J. Goldstein, Sara A. Hurvitz, Steven J. Isakoff, Rachel C. Jankowitz, Sara H. Javid, Jairam Krishnamurthy, Marilyn Leitch, Janice Lyons, Joanne Mortimer, Sameer A. Patel, Lori J. Pierce, Laura H. Rosenberger, Hope S. Rugo, Amy Sitapati, Karen Lisa Smith, Mary Lou Smith, Hatem Soliman, Erica M. Stringer-Reasor, Melinda L. Telli, John H. Ward, Kari B. Wisinski, Jessica S. Young, Jennifer Burns, and Rashmi Kumar

concluded that HER2 status for DCIS does not alter the management strategy and therefore is not recommended for DCIS. Genetic counseling is recommended if the patient is considered to be at high risk for hereditary breast cancer as defined by the NCCN

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Robert W. Carlson, D. Craig Allred, Benjamin O. Anderson, Harold J. Burstein, W. Bradford Carter, Stephen B. Edge, John K. Erban, William B. Farrar, Andres Forero, Sharon Hermes Giordano, Lori J. Goldstein, William J. Gradishar, Daniel F. Hayes, Clifford A. Hudis, Britt-Marie Ljung, David A. Mankoff, P. Kelly Marcom, Ingrid A. Mayer, Beryl McCormick, Lori J. Pierce, Elizabeth C. Reed, Jasgit Sachdev, Mary Lou Smith, George Somlo, John H. Ward, Antonio C. Wolff, and Richard Zellars

count, liver function tests, bilateral diagnostic mammography, breast ultrasonography if necessary, tumor ER and PR determinations, HER2 tumor status determination, and pathology review (see page 138). Genetic counseling is recommended if the patient is

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R. Michael Tuttle, Douglas W. Ball, David Byrd, Gilbert H. Daniels, Raza A. Dilawari, Gerard M. Doherty, Quan-Yang Duh, Hormoz Ehya, William B. Farrar, Robert I. Haddad, Fouad Kandeel, Richard T. Kloos, Peter Kopp, Dominick M. Lamonica, Thom R. Loree, William M. Lydiatt, Judith McCaffrey, John A. Olson Jr., Lee Parks, John A. Ridge, Jatin P. Shah, Steven I. Sherman, Cord Sturgeon, Steven G. Waguespack, Thomas N. Wang, and Lori J. Wirth

-oncogene mutations should be encouraged for all patients with newly diagnosed clinically apparent sporadic MTC, and for screening children and adults in known kindreds with inherited forms of MTC. Genetic counseling should be considered. Generally accepted

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Dawn Provenzale, Samir Gupta, Dennis J. Ahnen, Travis Bray, Jamie A. Cannon, Gregory Cooper, Donald S. David, Dayna S. Early, Deborah Erwin, James M. Ford, Francis M. Giardiello, William Grady, Amy L. Halverson, Stanley R. Hamilton, Heather Hampel, Mohammad K. Ismail, Jason B. Klapman, David W. Larson, Audrey J. Lazenby, Patrick M. Lynch, Robert J. Mayer, Reid M. Ness, Scott E. Regenbogen, Niloy Jewel Samadder, Moshe Shike, Gideon Steinbach, David Weinberg, Mary Dwyer, and Susan Darlow

unwilling to be tested, more distant relatives should be offered testing for the known family mutation. There are many other issues involved in the process of genetic counseling for individuals for pre-symptomatic testing for cancer susceptibility. Some

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Uterine Neoplasms, available at NCCN.org ) are focused on Lynch syndrome and recommend that genetic counseling/testing be considered in those diagnosed at <50 years of age. We found that 39.3% of identified pathogenic variants were in genes not