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Ruben Mesa, Catriona Jamieson, Ravi Bhatia, Michael W. Deininger, Aaron T. Gerds, Ivana Gojo, Jason Gotlib, Krishna Gundabolu, Gabriela Hobbs, Rebecca B. Klisovic, Patricia Kropf, Sanjay R. Mohan, Stephen Oh, Eric Padron, Nikolai Podoltsev, Daniel A. Pollyea, Raajit Rampal, Lindsay A. M. Rein, Bart Scott, David S. Snyder, Brady L. Stein, Srdan Verstovsek, Martha Wadleigh, Eunice S. Wang, Mary Anne Bergman, Kristina M. Gregory, and Hema Sundar

daily living. 2 , 3 Constitutional symptoms (fever, night sweats, and weight loss) are more frequently reported in patients with MF compared with those with PV or ET. 2 , 42 In a recent landmark survey that evaluated the symptom burden experienced by

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Daniel C. McFarland, Heather Polizzi, John Mascarenhas, Marina Kremyanskaya, Jimmie Holland, and Ronald Hoffman

pain (43%), fevers (13%), weight loss (10%), and splenic pain (4%). MPN-associated symptom burden and inability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs) were associated with worsening cytopenias and splenomegaly. 5 However, distress, anxiety, and

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who’ve been through the process already. The patient and family experience has been improved due to Moffitt’s nursing team’s efforts to provide dedicated education on the common side effects for CAR T-cell therapy, such as high fevers, neurotoxicity

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Andrew D. Zelenetz, William G. Wierda, Jeremy S. Abramson, Ranjana H. Advani, C. Babis Andreadis, Nancy Bartlett, Naresh Bellam, John C. Byrd, Myron S. Czuczman, Luis E. Fayad, Martha J. Glenn, Jon P. Gockerman, Leo I. Gordon, Nancy Lee Harris, Richard T. Hoppe, Steven M. Horwitz, Christopher R. Kelsey, Youn H. Kim, Susan Krivacic, Ann S. LaCasce, Auayporn Nademanee, Pierluigi Porcu, Oliver Press, Barbara Pro, Nishitha Reddy, Lubomir Sokol, Lode Swinnen, Christina Tsien, Julie M. Vose, Joachim Yahalom, Nadeem Zafar, Mary A. Dwyer, and Maoko Naganuma

65 years. Tumor flare reactions occurred in 71% of patients, but were grade 1 or 2 in nearly all cases. The most common grade 3 or 4 toxicity was neutropenia, which was reported in 49% of patients. Neutropenic fever occurred in 4 patients (6%). 24

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Jennifer M. Hinkel, Edward C. Li, and Stephen L. Sherman

less than 20,000/μL for fever, sepsis, uncontrolled infections, a blood urea nitrogen of greater than 70, or veno-occlusive disease. One institution with a usual threshold of less than 10,000/μL increases this threshold to less than 20,000/μL for

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Jeffrey Crawford, James Armitage, Lodovico Balducci, Pamela Sue Becker, Douglas W. Blayney, Spero R. Cataland, Mark L. Heaney, Susan Hudock, Dwight D. Kloth, David J. Kuter, Gary H. Lyman, Brandon McMahon, Hope S. Rugo, Ayman A. Saad, Lee S. Schwartzberg, Sepideh Shayani, David P. Steensma, Mahsa Talbott, Saroj Vadhan-Raj, Peter Westervelt, Michael Westmoreland, Mary Dwyer, and Maria Ho

severe chronic neutropenia) based on a randomized controlled trial involving 123 patients. 109 In this study, daily treatment with subcutaneously administered G-CSF normalized neutrophils in most patients and prevented fever, mouth ulcers, and infections

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Jeffrey Crawford, Pamela Sue Becker, James O. Armitage, Douglas W. Blayney, Julio Chavez, Peter Curtin, Shira Dinner, Thomas Fynan, Ivana Gojo, Elizabeth A. Griffiths, Shannon Hough, Dwight D. Kloth, David J. Kuter, Gary H. Lyman, Mary Mably, Sudipto Mukherjee, Shiven Patel, Lia E. Perez, Adam Poust, Raajit Rampal, Vivek Roy, Hope S. Rugo, Ayman A. Saad, Lee S. Schwartzberg, Sepideh Shayani, Mahsa Talbott, Saroj Vadhan-Raj, Sumithira Vasu, Martha Wadleigh, Peter Westervelt, Jennifer L. Burns, and Lenora Pluchino

, although they were not severe and were reversible. These reactions included mild myalgias, facial flushing, low-grade fever, headache, bone discomfort, nausea, and dyspnea. 106 A side-effect profile of GM-CSF, completed several years later, reported a

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Nathan J. Moore, Megan Othus, Anna B. Halpern, Nicholas P. Howard, Linyi Tang, Kyle E. Bastys, Mary-Elizabeth M. Percival, Paul C. Hendrie, Garrett A. Hartley, Verna L. Welch, Elihu H. Estey, and Roland B. Walter

for 1 weekly visit and when new problems arose. The physician typically saw them 1 to 2 times per cycle. All patients with neutropenic fever were admitted for intravenous antibiotics and evaluation. However, some patients were discharged to complete a

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Saurabh Rajguru and Brad S. Kahl

). Toxicity was not insignificant, with 17% and 12% of patients hospitalized for grade 3 and 4 adverse events (AEs), respectively—mostly neutropenic fever. The 4-year PFS and OS rates were 73% and 81%, respectively. 10 An update after 6 years of follow

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Van K. Morris and Cathy Eng

disease. Most patients (56%) who received all planned doses per protocol remained alive after 12 months on study. All patients experienced treatment-related AEs, most of which were infusion-related reactions, including fevers, chills, and fatigue. Given