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Unusual Adverse Events in a Patient With BRAF-Mutated Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With BRAF/MEK Inhibition

Rohan Maniar, Stephanie M. Gallitano, Sameera Husain, Golnaz Moazami, Michael J. Weiss, and Catherine A. Shu

study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01336634 ). 5 , 6 Common adverse events (AEs) affecting >30% of patients receiving this combination treatment include pyrexia, chills, fatigue, peripheral edema, nausea/vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain

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Opioid and Benzodiazepine Use in Women With Breast Cancer: More Work on the Horizon

Juan P. Cata and Daniel D. Kim

nausea, which is usually related to the administration of chemotherapy agents. Opioids and benzodiazepines are also prescribed simultaneously in patients with cancer. However, studies demonstrate that the concomitant prescription of opioids and

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The Changing Paradigm of Treating Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

Renuka Iyer and Kaunteya Reddy

frequent adverse events were diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, asthenia, and fatigue. Median treatment duration was 4.6 months in the sunitinib group compared with 3.7 months in the placebo group. Median time from diagnosis was more than 2 years in both trials

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The Changing Treatment Landscape for Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma

Thomas W. Flaig

with chemotherapy (21% vs 11%). Most of the responses were in the first 6 months. The most common adverse reactions reported for at least 20% of pembrolizumab-treated patients included fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, pruritus, decreased appetite, nausea

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NCCN News

includes >55 books for patients and caregivers covering most major types of cancer, along with topics like managing cancer-related distress, nausea and vomiting, and survivorship (both healthy living and cancer-related late and long-term effects), plus

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NCCN News

part of the growing library that include 55 books for patients and caregivers from NCCN covering most major types of cancer, along with topics like managing cancer-related distress, nausea and vomiting, survivorship, and special considerations for

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Updates on the Management of Immunotherapy-Related Toxicities

Presented by: Marianne Davies, Jordan McPherson, and John A. Thompson

. Common toxicities include fatigue, pruritus, rash, nausea, and vomiting, but continuous monitoring for side effects is necessary throughout treatment, because specific irAEs may affect any organ system, are highly unpredictable, and vary in their timing

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NCCN News

resources in parts of Africa. So far, the NCCN Harmonized Guidelines for Sub-Saharan Africa include: Adult Cancer Pain Antiemesis (nausea and vomiting prevention) B-Cell Lymphomas (Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphomas) Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Cervical Cancer Chronic

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NCCN News

; Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Distress; Hodgkin Lymphoma; Lung Cancer Screening; Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma; Melanoma; Multiple Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Nausea and Vomiting

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Additional Abstracts from the NCCN 21st Annual Conference: Advancing the Standard of Cancer Care™

cisplatin's high emetogenic potential, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) can be prevented in most patients with appropriate antiemetic regimens. Antiemetic guidelines recommend that patients treated with cisplatin should receive a combination