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Jennifer A. Ligibel

diagnosis have lower rates of recurrence and death compared with sedentary individuals. A growing number of exercise intervention studies show that increased physical activity after diagnosis leads to improvements in quality of life, fatigue, and body image

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David D. Chism

-related AEs (TRAEs) included fatigue, pneumonitis, rash, and dyspnea. Among the 119 cisplatin-ineligible patients in cohort 1 who received atezolizumab in the first-line setting, there was an ORR of 23% (95% CI, 16–31) and a CR of 9%, with durable responses

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Jimmie C. Holland

-report was considered totally invalid,” explained Dr. Holland. To begin to measure subjective symptoms, validated, quantitative tools were developed in the 1970s and 1980s. Scales focused on items such as health-related quality of life, pain, fatigue

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Philip E. Lammers and Leora Horn

show superiority. The toxicities differed between arms; more grade 3/4 thrombocytopenia (23.3% vs 5.6%), anemia (14.5% vs 2.7%), and fatigue (10.9% vs 5.0%) were seen in the pemetrexed group, whereas more grade 3/4 neutropenia (40.6% vs 25.8%), febrile

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Neel K. Gupta and Charalambos Andreadis

performed. He was asymptomatic, without palpable adenopathy or organomegaly, and was monitored expectantly during the next 5 years, remaining free of symptoms or hematologic abnormalities. By August 2009 he developed mild fatigue, cervical lymphadenopathy

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Emily C. Harrold, Ahmad F. Idris, Niamh M. Keegan, Lynda Corrigan, Min Yuen Teo, Martin O’Donnell, Sean Tee Lim, Eimear Duff, Dearbhaile M. O’Donnell, M. John Kennedy, Sue Sukor, Cliona Grant, David G. Gallagher, Sonya Collier, Tara Kingston, Ann Marie O’Dwyer, and Sinead Cuffe

trajectory, with an impact on multiple functional domains and a deleterious effect on overall quality of life. 48 Improving sleep outcomes is significantly related to improvements in quality of life and reduced daytime fatigue. 49 Data also suggest an

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Kerry Schaffer, Narmadha Panneerselvam, Kah Poh Loh, Rachel Herrmann, Ian R. Kleckner, Richard Francis Dunne, Po-Ju Lin, Charles E. Heckler, Nicholas Gerbino, Lauren B. Bruckner, Eugene Storozynsky, Bonnie Ky, Andrea Baran, Supriya Gupta Mohile, Karen Michelle Mustian, and Chunkit Fung

intensity as part of routine cancer care. Poor adherence to exercise interventions is a major barrier to achieving the optimal benefits of exercise. 13 – 16 The presence of symptoms related to cancer and its treatments, including fatigue, depression

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1 or 2 toxicities included nausea, anorexia, dysphagia, dehydration, esophagitis, fatigue, constipation, and pain. Grade 3 toxicities included nausea, hyperglycemia, anemia, and leukopenia. One patient had grade 4 toxicity of hyponatremia. One

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Daniel C. McFarland, Heather Polizzi, John Mascarenhas, Marina Kremyanskaya, Jimmie Holland, and Ronald Hoffman

assessment of MPN-related symptom burden was captured using the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI) and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Anemia (FACT-An). The most common symptoms were significant fatigue (81%), pruritus (53%), night sweats (49%), bone

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Arti Hurria, Ilene S. Browner, Harvey Jay Cohen, Crystal S. Denlinger, Mollie deShazo, Martine Extermann, Apar Kishor P. Ganti, Jimmie C. Holland, Holly M. Holmes, Mohana B. Karlekar, Nancy L. Keating, June McKoy, Bruno C. Medeiros, Ewa Mrozek, Tracey O’Connor, Stephen H. Petersdorf, Hope S. Rugo, Rebecca A. Silliman, William P. Tew, Louise C. Walter, Alva B. Weir III, and Tanya Wildes

, depression, distress, osteoporosis, falls, fatigue, and frailty are some of the most common syndromes in elderly cancer patients. 97 Elderly patients with cancer experience a higher prevalence of geriatric syndromes compared with those without cancer. In