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Aaron T. Gerds, Jason Gotlib, Prithviraj Bose, Michael W. Deininger, Andrew Dunbar, Amro Elshoury, Tracy I. George, Ivana Gojo, Krishna Gundabolu, Elizabeth Hexner, Gabriela Hobbs, Tania Jain, Catriona Jamieson, Andrew T. Kuykendall, Brandon McMahon, Sanjay R. Mohan, Vivian Oehler, Stephen Oh, Animesh Pardanani, Nikolai Podoltsev, Erik Ranheim, Lindsay Rein, Rachel Salit, David S. Snyder, Brady L. Stein, Moshe Talpaz, Swapna Thota, Pankit Vachhani, Martha Wadleigh, Katherine Walsh, Dawn C. Ward, Mary Anne Bergman, and Hema Sundar

Eosinophilic disorders and related syndromes represent a heterogeneous group of neoplastic and nonneoplastic conditions, characterized by more eosinophils in the peripheral blood, and may involve eosinophil-induced organ damage. In the WHO classification of myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms, eosinophilic disorders characterized by dysregulated tyrosine kinase (TK) fusion genes are recognized as a new category termed, myeloid/lymphoid neoplasms with eosinophilia and rearrangement of PDGFRA, PDGFRB or FGFR1 or with PCM1-JAK2. In addition to these aforementioned TK fusion genes, rearrangements involving FLT3 and ABL1 genes have also been described. These new NCCN Guidelines include recommendations for the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of any one of the myeloid/lymphoid neoplasms with eosinophilia (MLN-Eo) and a TK fusion gene included in the 2017 WHO Classification, as well as MLN-Eo and a FLT3 or ABL1 rearrangement.

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Arnel Pallera, Jessica K. Altman, Ellin Berman, Camille N. Abboud, Bhavana Bhatnagar, Peter Curtin, Daniel J. DeAngelo, Jason Gotlib, R. Tanner Hagelstrom, Gabriela Hobbs, Madan Jagasia, Hagop M. Kantarjian, Patricia Kropf, Leland Metheny, Joseph O. Moore, Evelena Ontiveros, Enkhtsetseg Purev, Albert Quiery, Vishnu V.B. Reddy, Michal G. Rose, Neil P. Shah, B. Douglas Smith, David S. Snyder, Kendra L. Sweet, Raoul Tibes, David T. Yang, Kristina Gregory, Hema Sundar, Michael Deininger, and Jerald P. Radich

The NCCN Guidelines for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) provide recommendations for the management of chronic-phase and advanced-phase CML in adult patients. The median age of disease onset is 67 years. However, because CML occurs in all age groups, clinical care teams should be prepared to address issues relating to fertility and pregnancy with patients who are of reproductive age at the time of diagnosis. CML is relatively rare in children and there are no evidence-based recommendations for the management of CML in pediatric population. These NCCN Guidelines Insights discuss special considerations for the management of CML during pregnancy and for the management of CML in the pediatric population.

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Michael W. Deininger, Neil P. Shah, Jessica K. Altman, Ellin Berman, Ravi Bhatia, Bhavana Bhatnagar, Daniel J. DeAngelo, Jason Gotlib, Gabriela Hobbs, Lori Maness, Monica Mead, Leland Metheny, Sanjay Mohan, Joseph O. Moore, Kiran Naqvi, Vivian Oehler, Arnel M. Pallera, Mrinal Patnaik, Keith Pratz, Iskra Pusic, Michal G. Rose, B. Douglas Smith, David S. Snyder, Kendra L. Sweet, Moshe Talpaz, James Thompson, David T. Yang, Kristina M. Gregory, and Hema Sundar

Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is defined by the presence of Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) which results from a reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 [t(9;22] that gives rise to a BCR-ABL1 fusion gene. CML occurs in 3 different phases (chronic, accelerated, and blast phase) and is usually diagnosed in the chronic phase. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy is a highly effective first-line treatment option for all patients with newly diagnosed chronic phase CML. This manuscript discusses the recommendations outlined in the NCCN Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of patients with chronic phase CML.