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Thomas L. Sutton, Marina Affi Koprowski, Jeffrey A. Gold, Benjamin Liu, Alison Grossblatt-Wait, Caroline Macuiba, Andrea Lehman, Susan Hedlund, Flavio G. Rocha, Jonathan R. Brody, and Brett C. Sheppard

Background: Screening for cancer-related psychosocial distress is an integral yet laborious component of quality oncologic care. Automated preappointment screening through online patient portals (Portal, MyChart) is efficient compared with paper-based screening, but unstudied. We hypothesized that patient access to and engagement with EHR-based screening would positively correlate with factors associated with digital literacy (eg, age, socioeconomic status). Methods: Screening-eligible oncology patients seen at our Comprehensive Cancer Center from 2014 through 2019 were identified. Patients with active Portals were offered distress screening. Portal and screening participation were analyzed via multivariable logistic regression. Household income in US dollars and educational attainment were estimated utilizing zip code and census data. Results: Of 17,982 patients, 10,279 (57%) had active Portals and were offered distress screening. On multivariable analysis, older age (odds ratio [OR], 0.97/year; P<.001); male gender (OR, 0.89; P<.001); Black (OR, 0.47; P<.001), Hawaiian/Pacific Islander (OR, 1.54; P=.007), and Native American/Alaskan Native race (OR, 0.67; P=.04); Hispanic ethnicity (OR, 0.76; P<.001); and Medicare (OR, 0.59; P<.001), Veteran’s Affairs/military (OR, 0.09; P<.01), Medicaid (OR, 0.34; P<.001), or no insurance coverage (OR, 0.57; P<.001) were independently associated with lower odds of being offered distress screening; increasing income (OR, 1.05/$10,000; P<.001) and educational attainment (OR, 1.03/percent likelihood of bachelor’s degree or higher; P<.001) were independently associated with higher odds. In patients offered electronic screening, participation rate was 36.6% (n=3,758). Higher educational attainment (OR, 1.01; P=.03) was independently associated with participation, whereas Black race (OR, 0.58; P=.004), Hispanic ethnicity (OR, 0.68; P=.01), non-English primary language (OR, 0.67; P=.03), and Medicaid insurance (OR, 0.78; P<.001) were independently associated with nonparticipation. Conclusions: Electronic portal–based screening for cancer-related psychosocial distress leads to underscreening of vulnerable populations. At institutions using electronic distress screening workflows, supplemental screening for patients unable or unwilling to engage with electronic screening is recommended to ensure efficient yet equal-opportunity distress screening.

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Margaret Tempero

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Cesar A. Santa-Maria, Maureen O’Donnell, Raquel Nunes, Jean L. Wright, and Vered Stearns

The KEYNOTE-522 study is a practice-changing phase III randomized study that demonstrated that the addition of pembrolizumab to polychemotherapy improves outcomes in patients with high-risk early-stage triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). This regimen is highly efficacious with unprecedented pathologic complete response (pCR) rates, and clinically meaningful improvements in event-free survival (EFS). However, the combination is also associated with significant high-grade treatment-related toxicity. The backbone regimen deviated from common practice, including the addition of carboplatin, lack of dose dense anthracyclines, and adjuvant capecitabine for residual disease, thus brining important questions regarding real-world translation of these results. This brief report practically addresses some of the most relevant questions physicians and patients face in optimizing care using the best available evidence.

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Douglas E. Wood, Ella A. Kazerooni, Denise Aberle, Abigail Berman, Lisa M. Brown, Georgie A. Eapen, David S. Ettinger, J. Scott Ferguson, Lifang Hou, Dipen Kadaria, Donald Klippenstein, Rohit Kumar, Rudy P. Lackner, Lorriana E. Leard, Inga T. Lennes, Ann N.C. Leung, Peter Mazzone, Robert E. Merritt, David E. Midthun, Mark Onaitis, Sudhakar Pipavath, Christie Pratt, Varun Puri, Dan Raz, Chakravarthy Reddy, Mary E. Reid, Kim L. Sandler, Jacob Sands, Matthew B. Schabath, Jamie L. Studts, Lynn Tanoue, Betty C. Tong, William D. Travis, Benjamin Wei, Kenneth Westover, Stephen C. Yang, Beth McCullough, and Miranda Hughes

The NCCN Guidelines for Lung Cancer Screening recommend criteria for selecting individuals for screening and provide recommendations for evaluation and follow-up of lung nodules found during initial and subsequent screening. These NCCN Guidelines Insights focus on recent updates to the NCCN Guidelines for Lung Cancer Screening.

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Quisette P. Janssen, Jacob L. van Dam, Laura R. Prakash, Deesje Doppenberg, Christopher H. Crane, Casper H.J. van Eijck, Susannah G. Ellsworth, William R. Jarnagin, Eileen M. O’Reilly, Alessandro Paniccia, Marsha Reyngold, Marc G. Besselink, Matthew H.G. Katz, Ching-Wei D. Tzeng, Amer H. Zureikat, Bas Groot Koerkamp, Alice C. Wei, and for the Trans-Atlantic Pancreatic Surgery (TAPS) Consortium

Background: The value of neoadjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after 5-fluorouracil with leucovorin, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan, with or without dose modifications [(m)FOLFIRINOX], for patients with borderline resectable (BR) pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is uncertain. Methods: We conducted an international retrospective cohort study including consecutive patients with BR PDAC who received (m)FOLFIRINOX as initial treatment (2012–2019) from the Trans-Atlantic Pancreatic Surgery Consortium. Because the decision to administer RT is made after chemotherapy, patients with metastases or deterioration after (m)FOLFIRINOX or a performance score ≥2 were excluded. Patients who received RT after (m)FOLFIRINOX were matched 1:1 by nearest neighbor propensity scores with patients who did not receive RT. Propensity scores were calculated using sex, age (≤70 vs >70 years), WHO performance score (0 vs 1), tumor size (0–20 vs 21–40 vs >40 mm), tumor location (head/uncinate vs body/tail), number of cycles (1–4 vs 5–8 vs >8), and baseline CA 19-9 level (≤500 vs >500 U/mL). Primary outcome was overall survival (OS) from diagnosis. Results: Of 531 patients who received neoadjuvant (m)FOLFIRINOX for BR PDAC, 424 met inclusion criteria and 300 (70.8%) were propensity score–matched. After matching, median OS was 26.2 months (95% CI, 24.0–38.4) with RT versus 32.8 months (95% CI, 25.3–42.0) without RT (P=.71). RT was associated with a lower resection rate (55.3% vs 72.7%; P=.002). In patients who underwent a resection, RT was associated with a comparable margin-negative resection rate (>1 mm) (70.6% vs 64.8%; P=.51), more node-negative disease (57.3% vs 37.6%; P=.01), and more major pathologic response with <5% tumor viability (24.7% vs 8.3%; P=.006). The OS associated with conventional and stereotactic body RT approaches was similar (median OS, 25.7 vs 26.0 months; P=.92). Conclusions: In patients with BR PDAC, neoadjuvant RT following (m)FOLFIRINOX was associated with more node-negative disease and better pathologic response in patients who underwent resection, yet no difference in OS was found. Routine use of RT cannot be recommended based on these data.