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Margaret Tempero

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John A. Thompson, Bryan J. Schneider, Julie Brahmer, Amaka Achufusi, Philippe Armand, Meghan K. Berkenstock, Shailender Bhatia, Lihua E. Budde, Saurin Chokshi, Marianne Davies, Amro Elshoury, Yaron Gesthalter, Aparna Hegde, Michael Jain, Benjamin H. Kaffenberger, Melissa G. Lechner, Tianhong Li, Alissa Marr, Suzanne McGettigan, Jordan McPherson, Theresa Medina, Nisha A. Mohindra, Anthony J. Olszanski, Olalekan Oluwole, Sandip P. Patel, Pradnya Patil, Sunil Reddy, Mabel Ryder, Bianca Santomasso, Scott Shofer, Jeffrey A. Sosman, Yinghong Wang, Vlad G. Zaha, Megan Lyons, Mary Dwyer, and Lisa Hang

The aim of the NCCN Guidelines for Management of Immunotherapy-Related Toxicities is to provide guidance on the management of immune-related adverse events resulting from cancer immunotherapy. The NCCN Management of Immunotherapy-Related Toxicities Panel is an interdisciplinary group of representatives from NCCN Member Institutions, consisting of medical and hematologic oncologists with expertise across a wide range of disease sites, and experts from the areas of dermatology, gastroenterology, endocrinology, neurooncology, nephrology, cardio-oncology, ophthalmology, pulmonary medicine, and oncology nursing. The content featured in this issue is an excerpt of the recommendations for managing toxicities related to CAR T-cell therapies and a review of existing evidence. For the full version of the NCCN Guidelines, including recommendations for managing toxicities related to immune checkpoint inhibitors, visit NCCN.org.

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NCCN Guidelines® Insights: Hodgkin Lymphoma, Version 2.2022

Featured Updates to the NCCN Guidelines

Richard T. Hoppe, Ranjana H. Advani, Weiyun Z. Ai, Richard F. Ambinder, Philippe Armand, Celeste M. Bello, Cecil M. Benitez, Weina Chen, Bouthaina Dabaja, Megan E. Daly, Leo I. Gordon, Neil Hansen, Alex F. Herrera, Ephraim P. Hochberg, Patrick B. Johnston, Mark S. Kaminski, Christopher R. Kelsey, Vaishalee P. Kenkre, Nadia Khan, Ryan C. Lynch, Kami Maddocks, Jonathan McConathy, Monika Metzger, David Morgan, Carolyn Mulroney, Sheeja T. Pullarkat, Rachel Rabinovitch, Karen C. Rosenspire, Stuart Seropian, Randa Tao, Pallawi Torka, Jane N. Winter, Joachim Yahalom, Joanna C. Yang, Jennifer L. Burns, Mallory Campbell, and Hema Sundar

Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is an uncommon malignancy of B-cell origin. Classical HL (cHL) and nodular lymphocyte–predominant HL are the 2 main types of HL. The cure rates for HL have increased so markedly with the advent of modern treatment options that overriding treatment considerations often relate to long-term toxicity. These NCCN Guidelines Insights discuss the recent updates to the NCCN Guidelines for HL focusing on (1) radiation therapy dose constraints in the management of patients with HL, and (2) the management of advanced-stage and relapsed or refractory cHL.

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Leslie A. Fecher, Shrinivas Bishu, Robert J. Fontana, Salim S. Hayek, and Bryan J. Schneider

Immune checkpoint inhibitors have revolutionized the treatment of cancer and are now omnipresent. However, immune-related adverse events can present with varying phenotypes and timing, which can pose diagnostic and therapeutic challenges for the treating oncologist as well as subspecialty consultants. Biopsies of affected organs may provide insight into biologic mechanisms as well as potentially guide management in certain circumstances.

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Kathryn P. Lowry, Katherine A. Callaway, Janie M. Lee, Fang Zhang, Dennis Ross-Degnan, J. Frank Wharam, Karla Kerlikowske, Karen J. Wernli, Allison W. Kurian, Louise M. Henderson, and Natasha K. Stout

Background: Annual mammography is recommended for breast cancer survivors; however, population-level temporal trends in surveillance mammography participation have not been described. Our objective was to characterize trends in annual surveillance mammography participation among women with a personal history of breast cancer over a 13-year period. Methods: We examined annual surveillance mammography participation from 2004 to 2016 in a nationwide sample of commercially insured women with prior breast cancer. Rates were stratified by age group (40–49 vs 50–64 years), visit with a surgical/oncology specialist or primary care provider within the prior year, and sociodemographic characteristics. Joinpoint models were used to estimate annual percentage changes (APCs) in participation during the study period. Results: Among 141,672 women, mammography rates declined from 74.1% in 2004 to 67.1% in 2016. Rates were stable from 2004 to 2009 (APC, 0.1%; 95% CI, −0.5% to 0.8%) but declined 1.5% annually from 2009 to 2016 (95% CI, −1.9% to −1.1%). For women aged 40 to 49 years, rates declined 2.8% annually (95% CI, −3.4% to −2.1%) after 2009 versus 1.4% annually in women aged 50 to 64 years (95% CI, −1.9% to −1.0%). Similar trends were observed in women who had seen a surgeon/oncologist (APC, −1.7%; 95% CI, −2.1% to −1.4%) or a primary care provider (APC, −1.6%; 95% CI, −2.1% to −1.2%) in the prior year. Conclusions: Surveillance mammography participation among breast cancer survivors declined from 2009 to 2016, most notably among women aged 40 to 49 years. These findings highlight a need for focused efforts to improve adherence to surveillance and prevent delays in detection of breast cancer recurrence and second cancers.

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Leah Anton, Lauren Gallegos, and Chaitra Swain Simpson

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Hemant Kumar Joon,, Anamika Thalor,, and Dinesh Gupta