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Presenters: Lucy R. Langer, Amye J. Tevaarwerk, and Robin Zon

Moderator : Travis Osterman

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a massive surge in the use of telemedicine services in oncology. However, although telemedicine usage is not as high as it was early in the pandemic, it is not as low as it was before the pandemic, either, indicating that patients have a desire to receive care when, where, and how they want. Most oncology providers agree that telemedicine is beneficial and here to stay, but barriers hinder equitable delivery, such as racial/ethnic affiliations, older age, residing in a rural area, and lower socioeconomic status. The momentum created by the pandemic can serve to show the benefits of telemedicine and solidify its place in oncology care. However, addressing these disparities—and increasing widespread access to broadband and educating both patients and providers on how to use these technologies—is paramount.

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Presenters: Rajiv Agarwal and Lea K. Matsuoka

Moderator : Daniel B. Brown

Abstract

Liver transplant and resection are preferable for the management of hepatocellular carcinoma, but ultimately, tumor location, biology, and patient condition dictate treatment decisions. At the NCCN 2022 Annual Conference, a panel of experts used 3 case studies to develop an evidence-based approach to the treatment of similar patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Moderated by Daniel B. Brown, MD, FSIR, the session focused on current research regarding liver-directed and systemic therapy options.

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Presenters: Meena S. Moran and A. Marilyn Leitch

The latest version of NCCN Guidelines for Breast Cancer on locoregional management of early-stage breast cancer contains numerous updated recommendations, particularly focusing on management of the axilla, locoregional management after neoadjuvant therapy, and radiation delivery. Recommendations for axillary staging have been separated for patients who have undergone breast-conserving surgery and those who have had a mastectomy, creating 2 individual pathways. The section on locoregional treatment after neoadjuvant therapy has been reformatted; optimal management of this patient group continues to evolve. Lastly, specifics regarding the delivery and sequencing of radiotherapy have been updated.

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Presenter: Genevieve Boland

For treatment of melanoma, accumulated research has allowed the transition of the most effective treatments into earlier stages of disease management. To this end, immunotherapy has become approved for high-risk stage II and resected stage III melanoma, and is currently being evaluated in the neoadjuvant setting. BRAF/MEK-targeted therapy is also approved in the adjuvant setting and is being evaluated in neoadjuvant trials. In stage IV disease, the optimal sequencing of these 2 main approaches is with immunotherapy initiated first. Recently, the LAG-3 antibody relatlimab, in combination with nivolumab, has produced impressive responses with low toxicity and has become a new standard of care compared with anti–PD-1 monotherapy. As heterogeneity within disease stages has become better appreciated, staging and risk classification have been refined.

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Presenters: Valencia D. Thomas, Michael K. Wong, and Andrew J. Bishop

Nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs), which encompass a variety of cutaneous malignancies, are frequently managed with surgery, radiation therapy, cytotoxic chemotherapy, systemic immunotherapy, and active surveillance. In this tumor board–style forum, a panel of experts used several case studies as a basis to review these approaches and to describe existing clinical challenges. The current NCCN Guidelines for NMSC, which reflect the most up-to-date, evidence-based data relating to the evaluation and management of NMSCs, also provide key considerations and recommendations for the treatment of this patient population.

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Presenter: Julio M. Pow-Sang

Localized prostate cancer is a heterogeneous disease. However, some diagnostic features are helpful in categorizing patients into risk groups for adverse outcomes, such as pathology, imaging, and genetic profiling. Risk‐specific management options, including active surveillance, can be tailored to individual patients based on their risk profile. Clinicians should discuss the risks and benefits of each of these options with patients for informed decision-making.

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Presenters: Jane Yanagawa and Gregory J. Riely

For patients with resectable non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as well as those with metastatic disease, there have been significant recent advances in therapies. In patients with resectable disease, new evidence supports use of neoadjuvant nivolumab + chemotherapy for eligible patients with resectable stage II–IIIA NSCLC. Separate data lead to the recommendation for adjuvant atezolizumab (after adjuvant chemotherapy) for eligible patients with completely resected stage II–IIIA NSCLC and PD-L1 expression ≥1%. Adjuvant osimertinib (± adjuvant chemotherapy) is an alternative for eligible patients with completely resected stage IB–IIIA NSCLC and EGFR mutations (exon 19 del or L858R). For patients with metastatic NSCLC, molecular testing is recommended for EGFR and BRAF mutations; MET exon skipping 14 alterations; ALK, ROS1, RET, and NTRK1/2/3 gene arrangements; and KRAS G12C mutations. First-line targeted therapies are available for many of these targets and, in the second-line setting, there are new targeted agents for KRAS G12C mutations and EGFR exon 20 insertions.

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Presenter: William J. Gradishar

Treatment for metastatic HER2-negative breast cancer is becoming increasingly individualized as more of the tumor landscape is described and drugs are developed to target its pathways. Survival can be prolonged by CDK4/6 inhibitors in patients with hormone receptor–positive tumors and by immunotherapy in those with triple-negative disease. In patients with BRCA1/2 mutations, PARP inhibitors delay disease progression. Antibody–drug conjugates are expected to become critical components of the treatment landscape, and targeted drugs are proving to benefit small subsets of patients.

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Presenter: Thomas W. Flaig

Bladder cancer is not rare—in men, it is the fourth most common cancer and the eighth leading cause of cancer-related death. The emergence of new systemic therapies, approval of PD-1 and PD-L1 inhibitors, and progress in the development of biomarkers have revolutionized the treatment of this urologic malignancy. The current NCCN Guidelines, which reflect the most up-to-date, evidence-based data relating to the evaluation and management of bladder cancer, support the incorporation of some of these novel therapeutics into clinical practice.