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Jeffrey S. Dome, Elizabeth A. Mullen, David B. Dix, Eric J. Gratias, Peter F. Ehrlich, Najat C. Daw, James I. Geller, Murali Chintagumpala, Geetika Khanna, John A. Kalapurakal, Lindsay A. Renfro, Elizabeth J. Perlman, Paul E. Grundy, and Conrad V. Fernandez

Refinements in surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy since the mid-20th century have resulted in a survival rate exceeding 90% for patients with Wilms tumor (WT). Although this figure is remarkable, a significant proportion of patients continue to have event-free survival (EFS) estimates of <75%, and nearly 25% of survivors experience severe chronic medical conditions. The first-generation Children’s Oncology Group (COG) renal tumor trials (AREN ‘0’), which opened to enrollment in 2006, focused on augmenting treatment regimens for WT subgroups with predicted EFS <75% to 80%, including those with the adverse prognostic marker of combined loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at chromosomes 1p/16q, pulmonary metastasis with incomplete lung nodule response after 6 weeks of chemotherapy, bilateral disease, and anaplastic histology. Conversely, therapy was reduced for patient subgroups with good outcomes and potential for long-term toxicity, such as those with lung metastasis with complete lung nodule response after 6 weeks of chemotherapy. This article summarizes the key findings of the first-generation COG renal tumor studies and their implications for clinical practice.

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David Groheux, Elif Hindié, Marc Espié, and Gary A. Ulaner

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Reece J. Knippel and Cynthia L. Sears

The human gut microbiome has an ever-increasing role in the instigation and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). Recent investigations have focused on identifying the key causative bacterial species and the composition and structure of the microbiome as a whole that ultimately lead to tumorigenesis in the colon. Understanding the bacterial mechanisms that promote CRC provides a rich area for the development of new screening modalities and therapeutics that may improve patient outcomes. This article reviews the various mechanisms that bacteria in the gut use to induce and/or promote tumor formation, discusses the application of the microbiome in the prevention and therapy of CRC, and provides directions for future research endeavors aiming to develop a more complete understanding of this complex phenomenon.

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NCCN Guidelines® Insights: Uterine Neoplasms, Version 3.2021

Featured Updates to the NCCN Guidelines

Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum, Catheryn M. Yashar, Kristin Bradley, Susana M. Campos, Junzo Chino, Hye Sook Chon, Christina Chu, David Cohn, Marta Ann Crispens, Shari Damast, Elisabeth Diver, Christine M. Fisher, Peter Frederick, David K. Gaffney, Suzanne George, Robert Giuntoli II, Ernest Han, Brooke Howitt, Warner K. Huh, Jayanthi Lea, Andrea Mariani, David Mutch, Larissa Nekhlyudov, Mirna Podoll, Steven W. Remmenga, R. Kevin Reynolds, Ritu Salani, Rachel Sisodia, Pamela Soliman, Edward Tanner, Stefanie Ueda, Renata Urban, Stephanie L. Wethington, Emily Wyse, Kristine Zanotti, Nicole R. McMillian, and Angela D. Motter

The NCCN Guidelines for Uterine Neoplasms provide recommendations for diagnostic workup, clinical staging, and treatment options for patients with endometrial cancer or uterine sarcoma. These NCCN Guidelines Insights focus on the recent addition of molecular profiling information to aid in accurate diagnosis, classification, and treatment of uterine sarcomas.

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Yifan Wang, Adeline Cuggia, Alain Pacis, Jean-Christian Boileau, Victoria A. Marcus, Zu-Hua Gao, George Chong, William D. Foulkes, and George Zogopoulos

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) with DNA mismatch repair deficiency (MMRd) respond preferentially to immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs). However, a subset of MMRd PDACs does not respond to these agents. This report describes a patient with PDAC who experienced rapid disease progression suggestive of hyperprogressive disease. The case involved a 63-year-old man carrying a pathogenic germline PMS2 mutation who developed metastatic PDAC. His tumor showed isolated loss of PMS2 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). He was treated with pembrolizumab, but his disease rapidly progressed. Whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing of a liver metastasis biopsy, acquired at disease progression, showed a retained wild-type PMS2 allele and hallmarks of microsatellite stability, including low tumor mutational burden and low MSIsensor score. PCR-based microsatellite instability (MSI) testing of the treatment-naïve tumor showed microsatellite stability. The ICI-treated tumor had a lower density of CD8+ T-cell infiltration than the treatment-naïve tumor, which is contrary to the expected evolution with ICI responsiveness. Through this case and a review of the literature, we highlight the low penetrance of PMS2 germline mutations in PDAC and discuss pitfalls in ascertaining MMRd and MSI based on IHC testing alone. An orthogonal confirmatory assay is warranted in the presence of uncommon immunophenotypes, such as isolated PMS2 loss, to optimize selection of patients with PDAC for immunotherapy.

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Margaret Tempero

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Frank Balis, Daniel M. Green, Clarke Anderson, Shelly Cook, Jasreman Dhillon, Kenneth Gow, Susan Hiniker, Rama Jasty-Rao, Chi Lin, Harold Lovvorn III, Iain MacEwan, Julian Martinez-Agosto, Elizabeth Mullen, Erin S. Murphy, Mark Ranalli, Daniel Rhee, Denise Rokitka, Elisabeth (Lisa) Tracy, Tamara Vern-Gross, Michael F. Walsh, Amy Walz, Jonathan Wickiser, Matthew Zapala, Ryan A. Berardi, and Miranda Hughes

The NCCN Guidelines for Wilms Tumor focus on the screening, diagnosis, staging, treatment, and management of Wilms tumor (WT, also known as nephroblastoma). WT is the most common primary renal tumor in children. Five-year survival is more than 90% for children with all stages of favorable histology WT who receive appropriate treatment. All patients with WT should be managed by a multidisciplinary team with experience in managing renal tumors; consulting a pediatric oncologist is strongly encouraged. Treatment of WT includes surgery, neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiation therapy (RT) if needed. Careful use of available therapies is necessary to maximize cure and minimize long-term toxicities. This article discusses the NCCN Guidelines recommendations for favorable histology WT.

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Marissa B. Lawson, Christoph I. Lee, Daniel S. Hippe, Shasank Chennupati, Catherine R. Fedorenko, Kathleen E. Malone, Scott D. Ramsey, and Janie M. Lee

Background: The purpose of this study was to determine factors associated with receipt of screening mammography by insured women before breast cancer diagnosis, and subsequent outcomes. Patients and Methods: Using claims data from commercial and federal payers linked to a regional SEER registry, we identified women diagnosed with breast cancer from 2007 to 2017 and determined receipt of screening mammography within 1 year before diagnosis. We obtained patient and tumor characteristics from the SEER registry and assigned each woman a socioeconomic deprivation score based on residential address. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations of patient and tumor characteristics with late-stage disease and nonreceipt of mammography. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to identify predictors of subsequent mortality. Results: Among 7,047 women, 69% (n=4,853) received screening mammography before breast cancer diagnosis. Compared with women who received mammography, those with no mammography had a higher proportion of late-stage disease (34% vs 10%) and higher 5-year mortality (18% vs 6%). In multivariable modeling, late-stage disease was most associated with nonreceipt of mammography (odds ratio [OR], 4.35; 95% CI, 3.80–4.98). The Cox model indicated that nonreceipt of mammography predicted increased risk of mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 2.00; 95% CI, 1.64–2.43), independent of late-stage disease at diagnosis (HR, 5.00; 95% CI, 4.10–6.10), Charlson comorbidity index score ≥1 (HR, 2.75; 95% CI, 2.26–3.34), and negative estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor status (HR, 2.09; 95% CI, 1.67–2.61). Nonreceipt of mammography was associated with younger age (40–49 vs 50–59 years; OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.45–1.96) and increased socioeconomic deprivation (OR, 1.05 per decile increase; 95% CI, 1.03–1.07). Conclusions: In a cohort of insured women diagnosed with breast cancer, nonreceipt of screening mammography was significantly associated with late-stage disease and mortality, suggesting that interventions to further increase uptake of screening mammography may improve breast cancer outcomes.

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Shubham Sharma, Christopher M. Booth, Elizabeth A. Eisenhauer, and Bishal Gyawali

Background: Editorials accompanying the publication of trials in major oncology journals can have a substantial influence on clinical practice. We describe the prevalence of financial conflicts of interest (FCOIs) of authors writing such editorials and the extent to which FCOIs may shape the interpretation of clinical trials. Methods: We examined editorials published in 2018 alongside trial reports in the top 5 journals that publish cancer drug trials (New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, Lancet Oncology, JAMA Oncology, and Journal of Clinical Oncology). An editorial was considered to have an FCOI if at least one of the editorialists had any disclosed FCOI. An FCOI with the same company whose drug was being discussed in the editorial was classified as a direct FCOI. Editorials were reviewed for their content and classified as being unduly favorable (defined as the presence of a positive spin without discussion of limitations) or not. Association of an FCOI and a direct FCOI with writing an unduly favorable editorial was assessed. Results: Of the 90 editorials assessed, 74% (n=67) were classified as having an FCOI with the pharmaceutical industry, and 39% (n=35) had an FCOI with the same company whose product was being discussed in the editorial (direct FCOI). Editorials were classified as being unduly favorable toward the study drug in 12% (8 of 67) and 13% (3 of 23) (P=1.0) of those with and without FCOIs, respectively; corresponding rates with and without direct FCOI were 23% (8 of 35) and 5% (3 of 55), respectively (P=.009). Conclusions: Editorials in top oncology journals were frequently authored by experts with FCOIs, including direct FCOIs. Authoring an unduly favorable editorial for a new cancer drug was significantly associated with the author having a direct FCOI with the same company. These findings support the call for journals to ensure that authors of editorials have no direct FCOIs.