• 1

    Jemal A, Siegel R, Xu J, Ward E. Cancer statistics, 2010. CA Cancer J Clin 2010;60:277300.

  • 2

    Hoppe RT, Mauch PT, Armitage JO. Hodgkin Lymphoma, 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins; 2007.

  • 3

    Swerdlow SH, Campo E, Harris NL., eds. WHO classification of tumours of haematopoietic and lymphoid tissues, 4th ed. Lyon, France: IARC; 2008.

  • 4

    Carbone PP, Kaplan HS, Musshoff K. Report of the committee on hodgkin’s disease staging classification. Cancer Res 1971;31:18601861.

  • 5

    Mauch P, Goodman R, Hellman S. The significance of mediastinal involvement in early stage Hodgkin’s disease. Cancer 1978;42:10391045.

  • 6

    Lister TA, Crowther D, Sutcliffe SB. Report of a committee convened to discuss the evaluation and staging of patients with Hodgkin’s disease: Cotswolds meeting. J Clin Oncol 1989;7:16301636.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7

    Henry-Amar M, Friedman S, Hayat M. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate predicts early relapse and survival in early-stage Hodgkin disease. The EORTC Lymphoma Cooperative Group. Ann Intern Med 1991;114:361365.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8

    Tubiana M, Henry-Amar M, Hayat M. Prognostic significance of the number of involved areas in the early stages of Hodgkin’s disease. Cancer 1984;54:885894.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9

    Hasenclever D, Diehl V. A prognostic score for advanced Hodgkin’s disease. International Prognostic Factors Project on Advanced Hodgkin’s Disease. N Engl J Med 1998;339:15061514.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10

    Cheson BD, Horning SJ, Coiffier B. Report of an international workshop to standardize response criteria for non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas. NCI Sponsored International Working Group. J Clin Oncol 1999;17:1244.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11

    Cheson BD, Pfistner B, Juweid ME. Revised response criteria for malignant lymphoma. J Clin Oncol 2007;25:579586.

  • 12

    Caraway NP. Strategies to diagnose lymphoproliferative disorders by fine-needle aspiration by using ancillary studies. Cancer 2005;105:432442.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 13

    Hehn ST, Grogan TM, Miller TP. Utility of fine-needle aspiration as a diagnostic technique in lymphoma. J Clin Oncol 2004;22:30463052.

  • 14

    Meda BA, Buss DH, Woodruff RD. Diagnosis and subclassification of primary and recurrent lymphoma. The usefulness and limitations of combined fine-needle aspiration cytomorphology and flow cytometry. Am J Clin Pathol 2000;113:688699.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 15

    Sieniawski M, Reineke T, Nogova L. Fertility in male patients with advanced Hodgkin lymphoma treated with BEACOPP: a report of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG). Blood 2008;111:7176.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 16

    van der Kaaij MA, van Echten-Arends J, Simons AH, Kluin-Nelemans HC. Fertility preservation after chemotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma. Hematol Oncol 2010;28:168179.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 17

    Seam P, Juweid ME, Cheson BD. The role of FDG-PET scans in patients with lymphoma. Blood 2007;110:35073516.

  • 18

    Isasi CR, Lu P, Blaufox MD. A metaanalysis of 18F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography in the staging and restaging of patients with lymphoma. Cancer 2005;104:10661074.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 19

    Juweid ME. Utility of positron emission tomography (PET) scanning in managing patients with Hodgkin lymphoma. Hematology 2006;2006:259265.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 20

    de Wit M, Bohuslavizki KH, Buchert R. 18FDG-PET following treatment as valid predictor for disease-free survival in Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Ann Oncol 2001;12:2937.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 21

    Guay C, Lepine M, Verreault J, Benard F. Prognostic value of PET using 18F-FDG in Hodgkin’s disease for posttreatment evaluation. J Nucl Med 2003;44:12251231.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 22

    Gallamini A, Rigacci L, Merli F. The predictive value of positron emission tomography scanning performed after two courses of standard therapy on treatment outcome in advanced stage Hodgkin’s disease. Haematologica 2006;91:475481.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 23

    Gallamini A, Hutchings M, Avigdor A, Polliack A. Early interim PET scan in Hodgkin lymphoma: where do we stand? Leuk Lymphoma 2008;49:659662.

  • 24

    Terasawa T, Lau J, Bardet S. Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for interim response assessment of advanced-stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: a systematic review. J Clin Oncol 2009;27:19061914.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 25

    Gallamini A, Hutchings M, Rigacci L. Early interim 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography is prognostically superior to international prognostic score in advanced-stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma: a report from a joint Italian-Danish study. J Clin Oncol 2007;25:37463752.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 26

    Hutchings M, Loft A, Hansen M. FDG-PET after two cycles of chemotherapy predicts treatment failure and progression-free survival in Hodgkin lymphoma. Blood 2006;107:5259.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 27

    Advani R, Maeda L, Lavori P. Impact of positive positron emission tomography on prediction of freedom from progression after Stanford V chemotherapy in Hodgkin’s disease. J Clin Oncol 2007;25:39023907.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 28

    Markova J, Kobe C, Skopalova M. FDG-PET for assessment of early treatment response after four cycles of chemotherapy in patients with advanced-stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma has a high negative predictive value. Ann Oncol 2009;20:12701274.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 29

    Dann EJ, Bar-Shalom R, Tamir A. Risk-adapted BEACOPP regimen can reduce the cumulative dose of chemotherapy for standard and high-risk Hodgkin lymphoma with no impairment of outcome. Blood 2007;109:905909.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 30

    Sher DJ, Mauch PM, Van Den Abbeele A. Prognostic significance of mid- and post-ABVD PET imaging in Hodgkin’s lymphoma: the importance of involved-field radiotherapy. Ann Oncol 2009;20:18481853.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 31

    Podoloff DA, Advani RH, Allred C. NCCN Task Force report: positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scanning in cancer. J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2007;5(Suppl 1):S122; quiz S23–22.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 32

    Duhmke E, Franklin J, Pfreundschuh M. Low-dose radiation is sufficient for the noninvolved extended-field treatment in favorable early-stage Hodgkin’s disease: long-term results of a randomized trial of radiotherapy alone. J Clin Oncol 2001;19:29052914.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 33

    Gustavsson A, Osterman B, Cavallin-Stahl E. A systematic overview of radiation therapy effects in Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Acta Oncol 2003;42:589604.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 34

    Connors JM. State-of-the-art therapeutics: Hodgkin’s lymphoma. J Clin Oncol 2005;23:64006408.

  • 35

    Macdonald DA, Connors JM. New strategies for the treatment of early stages of Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2007;21:871880.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 36

    Santoro A, Bonadonna G, Valagussa P. Long-term results of combined chemotherapy-radiotherapy approach in Hodgkin’s disease: superiority of ABVD plus radiotherapy versus MOPP plus radiotherapy. J Clin Oncol 1987;5:2737.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 37

    Horning SJ, Hoppe RT, Breslin S. Stanford V and radiotherapy for locally extensive and advanced Hodgkin’s disease: mature results of a prospective clinical trial. J Clin Oncol 2002;20:630637.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 38

    Advani RH, Hoppe RT, Baer DM. Efficacy of abbreviated Stanford V chemotherapy and involved field radiotherapy in early stage Hodgkin’s disease: mature results of the G4 trial [abstract]. Blood 2009;114:Abstract 1670.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 39

    Abuzetun JY, Loberiza F, Vose J. The Stanford V regimen is effective in patients with good risk Hodgkin lymphoma but radiotherapy is a necessary component. Br J Haematol 2009;144:531537.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 40

    Bonadonna G, Bonfante V, Viviani S. ABVD plus subtotal nodal versus involved-field radiotherapy in early-stage Hodgkin’s disease: long-term results. J Clin Oncol 2004;22:28352841.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 41

    Engert A, Schiller P, Josting A. Involved-field radiotherapy is equally effective and less toxic compared with extended-field radiotherapy after four cycles of chemotherapy in patients with early-stage unfavorable Hodgkin’s lymphoma: results of the HD8 trial of the German Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Study Group. J Clin Oncol 2003;21:36013608.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 42

    Engert A, Plutschow A, Eich HT. Reduced treatment intensity in patients with early-stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma. N Engl J Med 2010;363:640652.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 43

    Horning SJ, Hoppe RT, Advani R. Efficacy and late effects of Stanford V chemotherapy and radiotherapy in untreated Hodgkin’s disease: mature data in early and advanced stage patients [asbtract]. Blood 2004;104:Abstract 308.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 44

    Gobbi PG, Levis A, Chisesi T. ABVD versus modified stanford V versus MOPPEBVCAD with optional and limited radiotherapy in intermediate- and advanced-stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma: final results of a multicenter randomized trial by the Intergruppo Italiano Linfomi. J Clin Oncol 2005;23:91989207.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 45

    Aversa SM, Salvagno L, Soraru M. Stanford V regimen plus consolidative radiotherapy is an effective therapeutic program for bulky or advanced-stage Hodgkin’s disease. Acta Haematol 2004;112:141147.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 46

    Edwards-Bennett SM, Jacks LM, Moskowitz CH. Stanford V program for locally extensive and advanced Hodgkin lymphoma: the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center experience. Ann Oncol 2010;21:574581.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 47

    Hoskin PJ, Lowry L, Horwich A. Randomized comparison of the stanford V regimen and ABVD in the treatment of advanced Hodgkin’s lymphoma: United Kingdom National Cancer Research Institute Lymphoma Group Study ISRCTN 64141244. J Clin Oncol 2009;27:53905396.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 48

    Gordon LI, Hong F, Fisher RI. A randomized phase III trial of ABVD vs. Stanford V +/radiation therapy in locally extensive and advanced stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma: an Intergroup study coordinated by the Eastern Cooperatve Oncology Group (E2496) [abstract]. Blood 2010;116:Abstract 415.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 49

    Advani R, Hong F, Fisher RI. Randomized phase III trial comparing ABVD + radiotherapy and the Stanford V regimen in patients with stage I/II bulky mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma: a subset analysis of the US Intergroup Trial E2496. Blood 2010;116:Abstract 416.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 50

    Eich HT, Diehl V, Görgen H. Intensified chemotherapy and dose-reduced involved-field radiotherapy in patients with early unfavorable Hodgkin’s lymphoma: final analysis of the German Hodgkin Study Group HD11 trial. J Clin Oncol 2010;28:41994206.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 51

    Longo D, Glatstein E, Duffey P. Radiation therapy versus combination chemotherapy in the treatment of early-stage Hodgkin’s disease: seven-year results of a prospective randomized trial. J Clin Oncol 1991;9:906917.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 52

    Meyer RM, Gospodarowicz MK, Connors JM. Randomized comparison of ABVD chemotherapy with a strategy that includes radiation therapy in patients with limited-stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma: National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group and the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group. J Clin Oncol 2005;23:46344642.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 53

    Rueda Dominguez A, Marquez A, Guma J. Treatment of stage I and II Hodgkin’s lymphoma with ABVD chemotherapy: results after 7 years of a prospective study. Ann Oncol 2004;15:17981804.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 54

    Straus DJ, Portlock CS, Qin J. Results of a prospective randomized clinical trial of doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD) followed by radiation therapy (RT) versus ABVD alone for stages I, II, and IIIA nonbulky Hodgkin disease. Blood 2004;104:34833489.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 55

    Canellos GP, Abramson JS, Fisher DC, LaCasce AS. Treatment of favorable, limited-stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma with chemotherapy without consolidation by radiation therapy. J Clin Oncol 2010;28:16111615.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 56

    Behar RA, Horning SJ, Hoppe RT. Hodgkin’s disease with bulky mediastinal involvement: effective management with combined modality therapy. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 1993;25:771776.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 57

    Longo DL, Russo A, Duffey PL. Treatment of advanced-stage massive mediastinal Hodgkin’s disease: the case for combined modality treatment. J Clin Oncol 1991;9:227235.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 58

    DeVita VT Jr, Simon RM, Hubbard SM. Curability of advanced Hodgkin’s disease with chemotherapy. Long-term follow-up of MOPP-treated patients at the National Cancer Institute. Ann Intern Med 1980;92:587595.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 59

    Canellos GP, Anderson JR, Propert KJ. Chemotherapy of advanced Hodgkin’s disease with MOPP, ABVD, or MOPP alternating with ABVD. N Engl J Med 1992;327:14781484.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 60

    Duggan DB, Petroni GR, Johnson JL. Randomized comparison of ABVD and MOPP/ABV hybrid for the treatment of advanced Hodgkin’s disease: report of an intergroup trial. J Clin Oncol 2003;21:607614.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 61

    Johnson PW, Radford JA, Cullen MH. Comparison of ABVD and alternating or hybrid multidrug regimens for the treatment of advanced Hodgkin’s lymphoma: results of the United Kingdom Lymphoma Group LY09 Trial (ISRCTN97144519). J Clin Oncol 2005;23:92089218.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 62

    Johnson PW, Sydes MR, Hancock BW. Consolidation radiotherapy in patients with advanced Hodgkin’s lymphoma: survival data from the UKLG LY09 randomized controlled trial (ISRCTN97144519). J Clin Oncol 2010:33523359.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 63

    Diehl V, Sieber M, Ruffer U. BEACOPP: an intensified chemotherapy regimen in advanced Hodgkin’s disease. The German Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Study Group. Ann Oncol 1997;8:143148.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 64

    Diehl V, Franklin J, Pfreundschuh M. Standard and increased-dose BEACOPP chemotherapy compared with COPP-ABVD for advanced Hodgkin’s disease. N Engl J Med 2003;348:23862395.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 65

    Engert A, Diehl V, Franklin J. Escalated-dose BEACOPP in the treatment of patients with advanced-stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma: 10 years of follow-up of the GHSG HD9 study. J Clin Oncol 2009;27:45484554.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 66

    Federico M, Luminari S, Iannitto E. ABVD compared with BEACOPP compared with CEC for the initial treatment of patients with advanced Hodgkin’s lymphoma: results from the HD2000 Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio dei Linfomi Trial. J Clin Oncol 2009;27:805811.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 67

    Carella AM, Bellei M, Brice P. High-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation versus conventional therapy for patients with advanced Hodgkin’s lymphoma responding to front-line therapy: long-term results. Haematologica 2009;94:146148.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 68

    Proctor SJ, Mackie M, Dawson A. A population-based study of intensive multi-agent chemotherapy with or without autotransplant for the highest risk Hodgkin’s disease patients identified by the Scotland and Newcastle Lymphoma Group (SNLG) prognostic index. A Scotland and Newcastle Lymphoma Group study (SNLG HD III). Eur J Cancer 2002;38:795806.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 69

    Aleman BM, Raemaekers JM, Tomisic R. Involved-field radiotherapy for patients in partial remission after chemotherapy for advanced Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2007;67:1930.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 70

    Aleman BM, Raemaekers JM, Tirelli U. Involved-field radiotherapy for advanced Hodgkin’s lymphoma. N Engl J Med 2003;348:23962406.

  • 71

    Fabian CJ, Mansfield CM, Dahlberg S. Low-dose involved field radiation after chemotherapy in advanced Hodgkin disease. A Southwest Oncology Group randomized study. Ann Intern Med 1994;120:903912.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 72

    Laskar S, Gupta T, Vimal S. Consolidation radiation after complete remission in Hodgkin’s disease following six cycles of doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine chemotherapy: is there a need? J Clin Oncol 2004;22:6268.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 73

    Kobe C, Dietlein M, Franklin J. Positron emission tomography has a high negative predictive value for progression or early relapse for patients with residual disease after first-line chemotherapy in advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma. Blood 2008;112:39893994.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 74

    Engert A, Kobe C, Markova J. Assessment of residual bulky tumor using FDG-PET in patients with advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma after completion of chemotherapy: final report of the GHSG HD15 trial [abstract]. Blood 2010;116:Abstract 764.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 75

    Lee AI, LaCasce AS. Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma. Oncologist 2009;14:739751.

  • 76

    Nogova L, Reineke T, Brillant C. Lymphocyte-predominant and classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma: a comprehensive analysis from the German Hodgkin Study Group. J Clin Oncol 2008;26:434439.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 77

    Diehl V, Sextro M, Franklin J. Clinical presentation, course, and prognostic factors in lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin’s disease and lymphocyte-rich classical Hodgkin’s disease: report from the European Task Force on Lymphoma Project on Lymphocyte-Predominant Hodgkin’s Disease. J Clin Oncol 1999;17:776783.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 78

    Nogova L, Reineke T, Eich HT. Extended field radiotherapy, combined modality treatment or involved field radiotherapy for patients with stage IA lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin’s lymphoma: a retrospective analysis from the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG). Ann Oncol 2005;16:16831687.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 79

    Schlembach PJ, Wilder RB, Jones D. Radiotherapy alone for lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin’s disease. Cancer J 2002;8:377383.

  • 80

    Tsai HK, Mauch PM. Nodular lymphocyte-predominant hodgkin lymphoma. Semin Radiat Oncol 2007;17:184189.

  • 81

    Wilder RB, Schlembach PJ, Jones D. European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and Groupe d’Etude des Lymphomes de l’Adulte very favorable and favorable, lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin disease. Cancer 2002;94:17311738.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 82

    Wirth A, Yuen K, Barton M. Long-term outcome after radiotherapy alone for lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma: a retrospective multicenter study of the Australasian Radiation Oncology Lymphoma Group. Cancer 2005;104:12211229.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 83

    Chen RC, Chin MS, Ng AK. Early-stage, lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin’s lymphoma: patient outcomes from a large, single-institution series with long follow-up. J Clin Oncol 2010;28:136141.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 84

    Feugier P, Labouyrie E, Djeridane M. Comparison of initial characteristics and long-term outcome of patients with lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma at clinical stages IA and IIA prospectively treated by brief anthracycline-based chemotherapies plus extended high-dose irradiation. Blood 2004;104:26752681.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 85

    Jackson C, Sirohi B, Cunningham D. Lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma—clinical features and treatment outcomes from a 30-year experience. Ann Oncol 2010;21:20612068.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 86

    Maeda LS, Advani RH. The emerging role for rituximab in the treatment of nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma. Curr Opin Oncol 2009;21:397400.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 87

    Ekstrand BC, Lucas JB, Horwitz SM. Rituximab in lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin disease: results of a phase 2 trial. Blood 2003;101:42854289.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 88

    Horning SJ, Bartlett NL, Breslin S. Results of a prospective phase II Trial of limited and extended rituximab treatment in nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin’s disease (NLPHD) [abstract]. Blood 2007;110:Abstract 644.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 89

    Schulz H, Rehwald U, Morschhauser F. Rituximab in relapsed lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma: long-term results of a phase 2 trial by the German Hodgkin Lymphoma Study Group (GHSG). Blood 2008;111:109111.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 90

    Azim HA Jr, Pruneri G, Cocorocchio E. Rituximab in lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin disease. Oncology 2009;76:2629.

  • 91

    Savage KJ, Skinnider B, Al Mansour M. Incorporation of ABVD increases cure rates of patients with limited stage nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma (NLPHL) [abstract]. Blood 2010;116:Abstract 3887.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 92

    Canellos GP, Mauch P. What is the appropriate systemic chemotherapy for lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin’s Lymphoma? J Clin Oncol 2010;28:e8.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 93

    Unal A, Sari I, Deniz K. Familial nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma: successful treatment with CHOP plus rituximab Leuk Lymphoma 2005;46:16131617.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 94

    Shankar AG, Daw S, Hall G. Treatment of children & adolescents with early stage nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma with a low intensity short duration chemotherapy regimen [CVP]—on behalf of the EuroNet-PHL group [abstract]. Blood 2006;108:Abstract 2471.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 95

    Miettinen M, Franssila KO, Saxen E. Hodgkin’s disease, lymphocytic predominance nodular. Increased risk for subsequent non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas. Cancer 1983;51:22932300.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 96

    Huang JZ, Weisenburger DD, Vose JM. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma arising in nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma: a report of 21 cases from the Nebraska Lymphoma Study Group. Leuk Lymphoma 2004;45:15511557.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 97

    Al-Mansour M, Connors JM, Gascoyne RD. Transformation to aggressive lymphoma in nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin’s lymphoma. J Clin Oncol 2010;28:793799.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 98

    Mauch P, Ng A, Aleman B. Report from the Rockefellar Foundation sponsored international workshop on reducing mortality and improving quality of life in long-term survivors of Hodgkin’s disease. Eur J Haematol Suppl 2005:6876.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 99

    Franklin J, Pluetschow A, Paus M. Second malignancy risk associated with treatment of Hodgkin’s lymphoma: meta-analysis of the randomised trials. Ann Oncol 2006;17:17491760.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 100

    Mudie NY, Swerdlow AJ, Higgins CD. Risk of second malignancy after non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma: a British cohort study. J Clin Oncol 2006;24:15681574.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 101

    Adams MJ, Lipsitz SR, Colan SD. Cardiovascular status in long-term survivors of Hodgkin’s disease treated with chest radiotherapy. J Clin Oncol 2004;22:31393148.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 102

    Aleman BM, van den Belt-Dusebout AW, De Bruin ML. Late cardiotoxicity after treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma. Blood 2007;109:18781886.

  • 103

    Heidenreich PA, Hancock SL, Lee BK. Asymptomatic cardiac disease following mediastinal irradiation. J Am Coll Cardiol 2003;42:743749.

  • 104

    Martin WG, Ristow KM, Habermann TM. Bleomycin pulmonary toxicity has a negative impact on the outcome of patients with Hodgkin’s lymphoma. J Clin Oncol 2005;23:76147620.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 105

    Boleti E, Mead GM. ABVD for Hodgkin’s lymphoma: full-dose chemotherapy without dose reductions or growth factors. Ann Oncol 2007;18:376380.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 106

    Evens AM, Cilley J, Ortiz T. G-CSF is not necessary to maintain over 99% dose-intensity with ABVD in the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma: low toxicity and excellent outcomes in a 10-year analysis. Br J Haematol 2007;137:545552.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 107

    Linch DC, Winfield D, Goldstone AH. Dose intensification with autologous bone-marrow transplantation in relapsed and resistant Hodgkin’s disease: results of a BNLI randomised trial. Lancet 1993;341:10511054.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 108

    Schmitz N, Pfistner B, Sextro M. Aggressive conventional chemotherapy compared with high-dose chemotherapy with autologous haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation for relapsed chemosensitive Hodgkin’s disease: a randomised trial. Lancet 2002;359:20652071.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 109

    Brice P, Bouabdallah R, Moreau P. Prognostic factors for survival after high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation for patients with relapsing Hodgkin’s disease: analysis of 280 patients from the French registry. Societe Francaise de Greffe de Moelle. Bone Marrow Transplant 1997;20:2126.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 110

    Moskowitz CH, Nimer SD, Zelenetz AD. A 2-step comprehensive high-dose chemoradiotherapy second-line program for relapsed and refractory Hodgkin disease: analysis by intent to treat and development of a prognostic model. Blood 2001;97:616623.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 111

    Moskowitz CH, Yahalom J, Zelenetz AD. High-dose chemoradiotherapy for relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma and the significance of pre-transplant functional imaging. Br J Haematol 2010;148:890897.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 112

    Josting A, Franklin J, May M. New prognostic score based on treatment outcome of patients with relapsed Hodgkin’s lymphoma registered in the database of the German Hodgkin’s lymphoma study group. J Clin Oncol 2002;20:221230.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 113

    Sureda A, Constans M, Iriondo A. Prognostic factors affecting long-term outcome after stem cell transplantation in Hodgkin’s lymphoma autografted after a first relapse. Ann Oncol 2005;16:625633.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 114

    Stiff PJ, Unger JM, Forman SJ. The value of augmented preparative regimens combined with an autologous bone marrow transplant for the management of relapsed or refractory Hodgkin disease: a Southwest Oncology Group phase II trial. Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2003;9:529539.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 115

    Wheeler C, Eickhoff C, Elias A. High-dose cyclophosphamide, carmustine, and etoposide with autologous transplantation in Hodgkin’s disease: a prognostic model for treatment outcomes. Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 1997;3:98106.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 116

    Horning SJ, Chao NJ, Negrin RS. High-dose therapy and autologous hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation for recurrent or refractory Hodgkin’s disease: analysis of the Stanford University results and prognostic indices. Blood 1997;89:801813.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 117

    Jabbour E, Hosing C, Ayers G. Pretransplant positive positron emission tomography/gallium scans predict poor outcome in patients with recurrent/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma. Cancer 2007;109:24812489.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 118

    Moskowitz AJ, Yahalom J, Kewalramani T. Pre-transplant functional imaging predicts outcome following autologous stem cell transplant for relapsed and refractory Hodgkin lymphoma. Blood 2010;116:49344937.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 119

    ChlVPP therapy for Hodgkin’s disease: experience of 960 patients. The International ChlVPP Treatment Group. Ann Oncol 1995;6:167172.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 120

    Aparicio J, Segura A, Garcera S. ESHAP is an active regimen for relapsing Hodgkin’s disease. Ann Oncol 1999;10:593595.

  • 121

    Colwill R, Crump M, Couture F. Mini-BEAM as salvage therapy for relapsed or refractory Hodgkin’s disease before intensive therapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation. J Clin Oncol 1995;13:396402.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 122

    Josting A, Rudolph C, Reiser M. Time-intensified dexamethasone/cisplatin/cytarabine: an effective salvage therapy with low toxicity in patients with relapsed and refractory Hodgkin’s disease. Ann Oncol 2002;13:16281635.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 123

    Montoto S, Camos M, Lopez-Guillermo A. Hybrid chemotherapy consisting of cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone, doxorubicin, bleomycin, and vinblastine (C-MOPP/ABV) as first-line treatment for patients with advanced Hodgkin disease. Cancer 2000;88:21422148.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 124

    Phillips JK, Spearing RL, Davies JM. VIM-D salvage chemotherapy in Hodgkin’s disease. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol 1990;27:161163.

  • 125

    Ferme C, Bastion Y, Lepage E. The MINE regimen as intensive salvage chemotherapy for relapsed and refractory Hodgkin’s disease. Ann Oncol 1995;6:543549.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 126

    Bartlett NL, Niedzwiecki D, Johnson JL. Gemcitabine, vinorelbine, and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (GVD), a salvage regimen in relapsed Hodgkin’s lymphoma: CALGB 59804. Ann Oncol 2007;18:10711079.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 127

    Santoro A, Magagnoli M, Spina M. Ifosfamide, gemcitabine, and vinorelbine: a new induction regimen for refractory and relapsed Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Haematologica 2007;92:3541.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 128

    Gopal AK, Press OW, Shustov AR. Efficacy and safety of gemcitabine, carboplatin, dexamethasone, and rituximab in patients with relapsed/refractory lymphoma: a prospective multicenter phase II study by the Puget Sound Oncology Consortium. Leuk Lymphoma 2010;51:15231529.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 129

    Sirohi B, Cunningham D, Powles R. Long-term outcome of autologous stem-cell transplantation in relapsed or refractory Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Ann Oncol 2008;19:13121319.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 130

    Gopal AK, Metcalfe TL, Gooley TA. High-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation for chemoresistant Hodgkin lymphoma: the Seattle experience. Cancer 2008;113:13441350.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 131

    Moskowitz CH, Kewalramani T, Nimer SD. Effectiveness of high dose chemoradiotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation for patients with biopsy-proven primary refractory Hodgkin’s disease. Br J Haematol 2004;124:645652.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 132

    Sweetenham JW, Taghipour G, Milligan D. High-dose therapy and autologous stem cell rescue for patients with Hodgkin’s disease in first relapse after chemotherapy: results from the EBMT. Lymphoma Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Bone Marrow Transplant 1997;20:745752.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 133

    Bierman PJ, Anderson JR, Freeman MB. High-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous hematopoietic rescue for Hodgkin’s disease patients following first relapse after chemotherapy. Ann Oncol 1996;7:151156.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 134

    Josting A, Nogova L, Franklin J. Salvage radiotherapy in patients with relapsed and refractory Hodgkin’s lymphoma: a retrospective analysis from the German Hodgkin Lymphoma Study Group. J Clin Oncol 2005;23:15221529.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 135

    Roach M III, Brophy N, Cox R. Prognostic factors for patients relapsing after radiotherapy for early-stage Hodgkin’s disease. J Clin Oncol 1990;8:623629.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 136

    Alvarez I, Sureda A, Caballero MD. Nonmyeloablative stem cell transplantation is an effective therapy for refractory or relapsed hodgkin lymphoma: results of a spanish prospective cooperative protocol. Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2006;12:172183.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 137

    Sureda A, Robinson S, Canals C. Reduced-intensity conditioning compared with conventional allogeneic stem-cell transplantation in relapsed or refractory Hodgkin’s lymphoma: an analysis from the Lymphoma Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. J Clin Oncol 2008;26:455462.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 399 266 16
PDF Downloads 66 56 2
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0