The Abu Dhabi Declaration: Why the Hustle?

Restricted access
Over the past decade, the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) have emerged as a very useful tool for supporting and improving the quality of decision-making for oncologists worldwide. Considering that approximately 12 million cancer patients were registered by the WHO during 2008 and that the NCCN Web site (www.NCCN.org) attracts more than 150,000 visitors per month, one can conclude that the NCCN Guidelines program has potentially influenced the management of approximately 15% of all cancer patients worldwide. Although this example shows its far-reaching benefit, it also shows that there is plenty of room for expanding its application. A real need exists within the oncology community to have a reliable evidence-based tool to translate the rapidly accumulating scientific research into practical medical decisions that may offer a better and more consistent treatment outcome for patients.The NCCN recently launched the NCCN–Middle East and North Africa (NCCN–MENA) Guidelines Congress in an attempt to provide versions of the original NCCN Guidelines tailored for cancer management in this region. However, one may ask whether it is really important to have a revised set of Guidelines specifically dedicated to a certain geographical region, when the original NCCN guidelines are satisfactory and comprehensive. We believe the answer is “YES” for 3 main reasons: differences in race, genetic, and environmental factors; differences in presenting features and stage; and differences in access to technology and drugs.Differences in Racial, Genetic, and Environmental FactorsThe NCCN Guidelines have been generated based on high-level evidence provided by...

Dr. Azim is Professor of Clinical Oncology at Cairo University in Egypt. His interests lie in lymphoma, breast cancer, bone metastases, and translational research, and has published more than 50 papers and 100 abstracts. Dr. Azim is a member of numerous societies, including ASCO and ASH. He sits on several scientific committees and has been an invited speaker to more than 100 regional and international conferences in the Middle East, Europe, United States, and Asia, and has published more than 50 papers and 100 abstracts.

Dr. Abdul-Rahman Jazieh, MD, MPH, is Chairman of the Department of Oncology at the King Abdulaziz Medical City in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. He is also a Professor at the King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences and a volunteer professor at the University of Cincinnati in Ohio. He is board certified in internal medicine, hematology, and medical oncology.

Dr. Jahanzeb is an international lecturer on issues related to breast and lung cancers. He is currently National Director for Quality Improvement in the Aptium Oncology network and a Professor of Medicine at University of Tennessee. He has served as a member of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Board of Directors, the NCCN Guidelines Steering and Investigators Steering Committees, and the Breast Cancer and Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Panels. He is currently the Medical Advisor on Global Initiatives. Dr. Jahanzeb is board certified in Internal Medicine with subspecialties in Hematology and Medical Oncology.

  • 1.

    Wheless L, Ruczinski I, Alani RM. The association between skin characteristics and skin cancer prevention behaviors. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2009;18:26132619.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2.

    Shigematsu H, Lin L, Takahashi T. Clinical and biological features associated with epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutations in lung cancers. J Natl Cancer Inst 2005;97:339346.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3.

    Lynch TJ, Bell DW, Sordella R. Activating mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor underlying responsiveness of non-small-cell lung cancer to gefitinib. N Engl J Med 2004;350:21292139.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4.

    Mok TS, Wu YL, Thongprasert S. Gefitinib or carboplatin-paclitaxel in pulmonary adenocarcinoma. N Engl J Med 2009;361:947957.

  • 5.

    Salim EI, Moore MA, Al-Lawati JA. Cancer epidemiology and control in the Arab world—past, present and future. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2009;10:316.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6.

    El Saghir NS, Khalil MK, Eid T. Trends in epidemiology and management of breast cancer in developing Arab countries: a literature and registry analysis. Int J Surg 2007;5:225233.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7.

    Fasani P, Sangiovanni A, De Fazio C. High prevalence of multinodular hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with cirrhosis attributable to multiple risk factors. Hepatology 1999;29:17041707.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8.

    Lehman EM, Wilson ML. Epidemiology of hepatitis viruses among hepatocellular carcinoma cases and healthy people in Egypt: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Int J Cancer 2009;124:690697.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9.

    Zaghloul MS, Nouh A, Moneer M. Time-trend in epidemiological and pathological features of schistosoma-associated bladder cancer. J Egypt Natl Canc Inst 2008;20:168174.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10.

    Azim HA & Azim HA Jr. Review article optimizing the use of her-2/neu targeting agents in breast cancer: a developing nation perspective. J Egypt Natl Canc Inst 2007;19:225230.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 64 52 4
PDF Downloads 6 5 2
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0