Screening for Lung Cancer: An Expert Review

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Ella A. Kazerooni
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Jacob Sands
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Douglas E. Wood
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The NCCN Guidelines for Lung Cancer Screening have evolved over time to reflect the latest evidence and expert consensus. These NCCN Guidelines have played a significant role in shaping clinical practice and policy, leading to increased payer coverage for lung cancer screening and decreasing lung cancer mortality. Continued research and advancements in early detection methods, along with the implementation of effective screening programs, will be crucial in the ongoing effort to reduce lung cancer mortality and improve the overall quality of life for patients affected by this disease.

Disclosures: Dr. Sands has disclosed serving as a scientific advisor for AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Blueprint Medicines, Boehringer Ingelheim, Curadev Pharma, Daiichi-Sankyo Co., Jazz Pharmaceuticals Inc., Medtronic, Inc., PharmaMar, Sanofi, and Takeda Pharmaceuticals North America, Inc. The remaining presenters have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Correspondence: Ella A. Kazerooni, MD, MS, University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, CVC #5482, Ann Arbor, MI 48109. Email: ellakaz@umich.edu;

Jacob Sands, MD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215. Email: jacob_sands@dfci.harvard.edu; and

Douglas E. Wood, MD, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific, BB-487, Box 356410, Seattle, WA 98195-6410. Email: dewood@u.washington.edu
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